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Search Results: MediaCollectionId equal to 'NasaNAS~16~16' and What equal to 'International Space Station (ISS)'

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International Space Sta...
2005-08-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-24596 (14 April 2005) --- Dallas, Texas is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 10 crewmember on the International Space Station. The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is the largest in Texas with an approximate population of 6 million people in 2005. Founded by John Neely Bryan in 1841, the city became the center for the United States oil economy with the discovery of oilfields to the east of the city in 1930. The Dallas-Forth Worth region today is a major corporate, banking, and technological center. This image captures the northwestern portion of the metropolitan area. Standing water bodies such as Lake Lewisville and Grapevine Lake are highlighted by sunglint, where the surface of the water acts as a mirror reflecting sunlight back towards the astronauts on the Station. Using the sunglint to define edges of water helps when mapping water bodies and stream courses on a landscape ? note the region of small ponds to the north of Grapevine Lake highlighted by sunglint.
International Space Sta...
2005-06-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-07471 (28 May 2005) --- Sept-?les, Gulf of St Lawrence, Quebec, Canada is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Seven Island Bay (left side of the image) is one of the largest (8?10 kilometers across) and best protected bays on Quebec?s north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Because this is both a deep water port and ice-free year round, Sept-?les is one of Quebec?s busiest ports. Locally produced materials (iron ore, alumina) comprise the bulk of port traffic, but Sept-?les also acts as a trans-shipment point for goods moving to Europe, the Far East and South America. The small city of Sept-?les (~30,000 people) appears in the center of the view; Pointe Noir is opposite the city in the lower left corner. The industrial park lies top left and the angled runways of the airport appear east of the city. Five (of the bay?s seven) islands appear at the bottom of the view. Wind and swells produce patterns on the water. Ships can be seen in the bay and a ship wake appears between the two left islands at the bottom of the view.
International Space Sta...
2006-11-13 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-63766 (2 Aug. 2006) --- Berkeley Pit and Butte, Montana are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city of Butte, Montana has long been a center of mining activity. Underground mining of copper began in Butte in the 1870s, and by 1901 underground workings had extended to the groundwater table. Thus began the creation of an intricate complex of underground drains and pumps to lower the groundwater level and continue the extraction of copper. Water extracted from the mines was so rich in dissolved copper sulfate that it was also "mined" (by chemical precipitation) for the copper it contained. In 1955, the Anaconda Copper Mining Company began open-pit mining for copper in what is now know as the Berkeley Pit (dark oblong area in center). The mine took advantage of the existing subterranean drainage and pump network to lower groundwater until 1982, when the new owner ARCO suspended operations at the mine. The groundwater level swiftly rose, and today water in the Pit is more than 900 feet deep. Many features of the mine workings are visible in this image such as the many terraced levels and access roadways of the open mine pits (gray and tan sculptured surfaces). A large gray tailings pile of waste rock and an adjacent tailings pond are visible to the north of the Berkeley Pit. Color changes in the tailings pond are due primarily to changing water depth. The Berkeley Pit is listed as a federal Superfund site due to its highly acidic water, which contains high concentrations of metals such as copper and zinc. The Berkeley Pit receives groundwater flowing through the surrounding bedrock and acts as a "terminal pit" or sink for these heavy metal-laden waters. Ongoing efforts include regulation of water flow into the pit to reduce filling of the Pit and potential release of contaminated water into local aquifers or surface streams.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-76262 (4 Sept. 2006) --- Lake Morari, Tibet is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. Melt-water from glaciers to the east and west drains into Lake Morari, a large lake on the Tibetan Plateau which lies at an altitude of 4,521 meters (14,830 feet). The main inflow to the lake is via a west-side stream. Mud from this river gives the light blue hues to the lake water. The well-formed alluvial fan (center), built by sediment from the main inflow river, is the reason the lake has formed at this point in the valley. The fan has dammed up the depression now occupied by Lake Morari (approximately 7 kilometers wide in this view) and forms the curved southern shore of the lake. The apex of the fan lies fully 40 meters above the level of the lake. The change of color and texture on the fan seems to result from a new influx of gray sediment on top of an older fan which had several channels cut into it. Interestingly, the alluvial fan also acts as the only outlet of the lake, although no obvious outlet channel can be seen in this detailed view. South of the fan an outlet river appears as a green surface, possibly due to aquatic vegetation or algae. Altitude measurements show that the outlet river lies many meters below the lake surface.
International Space Sta...
2006-09-25 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-81687 (17 Sept. 2006) --- A forest fire in southern California is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The day fire started in Los Padres National Forest north of Los Angeles on Sept. 4, 2006. Easterly winds on Sept. 17 blew the smoke west out to sea, and this wind shift was observed by station crewmembers. The forested mountains north of Los Angeles appear dark green, the smoke a dusky gray. Dense farmland at the south end of California's central valley is framed by the forested Sierra Nevada mountain range. White patches near the center of the view are dry lakes of the Mojave Desert, one of which acts as a landing site for the space shuttle. The dark irregular shape at image right is part of the space station. Death Valley and Las Vegas are visible at image right. The extent of the day fire smoke plume can be gauged from the gray urban region of greater Los Angeles (center) which stretches along 50 miles of coastline. The plume obscures the northern Channel Islands, but the southern Channel Islands are silhouetted against the ocean.
STS-117 Shuttle Mission...
2007-08-15 0:0:0
 
Description S117-E-06998 (10 June 2007) --- Polar Mesospheric Clouds are featured in this image photographed by a STS-117 crewmember onboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sometimes in the summertime in the far northern (or southern) latitudes, high in the Earth's atmosphere at the edge of space, thin silvery clouds form and are observed just after sunset. These high clouds, occurring at altitudes of about 80 kilometers (50 miles), are called Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) or noctilucent clouds, and are the subject of new studies to determine whether their occurrence is related to global climate change. Observations over the past few years suggest that PMC are now observed more frequently and at lower latitudes than historical observations. Several studies related to the International Polar Year (IPY), and the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) spacecraft are underway to collect relevant data on the chemistry and physics of the mesosphere that might explain the occurrence of PMC. Astronauts in orbiting spacecraft frequently observe PMC over Canada, northern Europe and Asia during June, July and August. While PMC also occur over the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere in December, January and February, astronaut observations of southern PMC are less frequent. Earlier in June 2007, the shuttle crew visiting the International Space Station observed spectacular PMC over north-central Asia. This image was taken looking north while the shuttle and station were docking and flying over the border between western China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan. The red-to-dark region at the bottom of the image is the dense part of the Earth's atmosphere. Because this image was taken with a long lens (180mm), the entire profile of the Earth's limb is not captured. To support IPY research over the next 2 years, station crewmembers will be looking for and documenting PMC in both hemispheres.
International Space Sta...
2005-02-28 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-15488 (7 July 2004) --- Solimoes-Negro River confluence at Manaus, Amazonia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). The largest river on the planet, the Amazon, forms from the confluence of the Solimoes (the upper Amazon River) and the Negro at the Brazilian city of Manaus in central Amazonas. At the river conjunction, the muddy, tan colored waters of the Solimoes meet the ?black? water of the Negro River. The unique mixing zone where the waters meet extends downstream through the rainforest for hundreds of kilometers, and is a famous attraction for tourists all over the world. It is the vast quantity of sediment eroded from the Andes Mountains that gives the Solimoes its tan color. By comparison, water in the Negro derives from the low jungles where reduced physical erosion of rock precludes mud entering the river. In place of sediment, organic matter from the forest floor stains the river the color of black tea.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43863 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. This view is toward the rear of the "new" room. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43842 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43985 (11 Oct. 2006) From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43860 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43851 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43986 (11 Oct. 2006) --- From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-28737 (July 2004) --- Four NASA crewmembers will look to the deep seas this month to help prepare for journeys into deep space. They'll use an undersea laboratory to study what it may be like to live and work in other extreme environments, such as the Moon and Mars. Astronaut John Herrington (left) will lead the crew in an undersea mission July 12-21 that will field-test equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. Astronauts Doug Wheelock (right) and Nick Patrick (second right) will join Herrington, a veteran space flier and spacewalker; and biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley in the Aquarius Underwater Laboratory off the coast of Key Largo, Fla., for the mission. University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) systems engineers Craig Cooper (not pictured) and Joe March (not pictured) will work side by side with the NASA crew in Aquarius.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29676 (12 July 2004) --- Biomedical Engineer Tara Ruttley participates in a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) along with her NEEMO-6 crewmates. The crew?s first objective was a two-hour underwater EVA to a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys to survey the area for future coral science operations. The crew is spending 10 days, July 12-21, 2004, field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29677 (12 July 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear in waters off the Florida Keys, astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, NEEMO-6 commander, participates in a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). The crew?s first objective was an underwater EVA to a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat to survey the area for future coral science operations. Herrington is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29678 (12 July 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear, the NEEMO-6 crewmembers leave the Aquarius habitat to begin a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). Their destination was a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat to survey the area for future coral science operations. Astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, commander, is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. From the left are astronauts Herrington and Doug Wheelock, biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley and astronaut Nick Patrick.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-28739 (July 2004) --- Four NASA crewmembers will look to the deep seas this month to help prepare for journeys into deep space. They'll use an undersea laboratory to study what it may be like to live and work in other extreme environments, such as the Moon and Mars. Astronaut John Herrington (second right) will lead the crew in an undersea mission July 12-21 that will field-test equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. Astronauts Doug Wheelock (second left) and Nick Patrick (right) will join Herrington, a veteran space flier and spacewalker; and biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley in the Aquarius Underwater Laboratory off the coast of Key Largo, Fla., for the mission. University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) systems engineers Craig Cooper (not pictured) and Joe March (not pictured) will work side by side with the NASA crew in Aquarius.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29915 (13 July 2004) --- Biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley sets up a wireless tracking system in the underwater Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys. On orbit, such technology may be useful to the crew surgeon when a transmitter is worn by a crewmember during an emergency medical contingency. Additionally, transmitters can be tagged to portable crew health equipment on the International Space Station (ISS) as a means of inventory tracking, or quickly identifying the location of certain hardware when needed. The objective of this hardware evaluation is to determine the efficacy of the tracking signal in the metal-walled Aquarius environment. The crew is spending 10 days, July 12-21, 2004, field-testing equipment and technology for the ISS as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-08-06 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-33586 (12-21 July 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear, the NEEMO-6 crewmembers arrive at the Aquarius habitat following a session of underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, commander, is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. From the left (back row) are Herrington and astronaut Doug Wheelock. From the left (front row) are biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley and astronaut Nick Patrick.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29914 (13 July 2004) --- Astronaut/aquanaut Nick Patrick performs line pullover using a Constant Force Resistive Exercise Unit (CFREU) with biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley spotting in the underwater Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys. The CFREU is designed to exercise muscle groups at a constant force concentrically and eccentrically throughout an entire range of motion during exercise. The crew is spending 10 days, July 12-21, 2004, field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-30174 (14 July 2004) --- Astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, NEEMO-6 commander, types a journal entry while in his living quarters in the Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys. Herrington is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-30173 (14 July 2004) --- Astronaut/aquanauts John Herrington (back to camera), NEEMO-6 commander, and Doug Wheelock, discuss timeline of events in the underwater Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys. Herrington is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2007-05-22 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2007-E-25266 (17 May 2007) --- A monitor inside the undersea habitat for the 12th NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission displays a "ship-to-ship" call between NEEMO 12 and Expedition 15 crewmembers on the International Space Station. The NEEMO 12 crew is spending 12 days, May 7-18, on an undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, which is operated by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS002-E-6475 (29 May 2001) --- James S. Voss, Expedition Two flight engineer, looks over an atlas in the Zvezda Service Module. The image was taken with a digital still camera.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS002-E-6472 (29 May 2001) --- Yury V. Usachev of Rosaviakosmos, Expedition Two mission commander, looks over an atlas in the Zvezda Service Module. The image was taken with a digital still camera.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-11144 (11 Dec. 2005) --- Sierra Nevada, Spain is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Sierra Nevada, part of the Betic Cordillera of southern Spain, was formed during the Alpine Orogeny (or mountain-building event) that also formed the European Alps to the east and the Atlas Mountains of northern Africa across the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The Sierra as observed today formed during the Tertiary Period (65 to 1.8 million years ago) during collision of the African and Eurasian continental plates. The former Tethys Sea also closed during this time period, the scientists say, and the Mediterranean Sea is the largest surviving remnant basin of the ancient Tethys. The Sierra Nevada in the Granada province of Spain is perhaps the southernmost skiing location in all of Europe. Veleta Peak, at an elevation of 3,398 meters above sea level, is a popular destination for skiers and snowboarders. The rapid transition from lofty ski runs to Mediterranean beaches within a few hours? drive has made the Sierra Nevada region popular for both outdoor and urban tourism. This photograph depicts the Veleta Peak region of the range and illustrates the sharp contrast between the snow capped mountains, adjacent dry lowlands to the west and north, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-19138 (24 March 2004) --- Astronaut C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA ISS science officer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-19135 (24 March 2004) --- Astronaut C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA ISS science officer, holds the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-19136 (24 March 2004) --- Astronaut C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA ISS science officer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2007-03-22 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-17232 (17 March 2007) --- Astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-65815 (12 Aug. 2006) --- Astronaut Jeffrey N. Williams, Expedition 13 NASA space station science officer and flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-65795 (12 Aug. 2006) --- Astronaut Jeffrey N. Williams, Expedition 13 NASA space station science officer and flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-23 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-68304 (19 Aug. 2006) --- Astronaut Jeffrey N. Williams, Expedition 13 NASA space station science officer and flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-23 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-68303 (19 Aug. 2006) --- Astronaut Jeffrey N. Williams, Expedition 13 NASA space station science officer and flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2007-12-06 0:0:0
 
Description ISS016-E-014207 (2 Dec. 2007) --- Astronaut Daniel Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-19132 (24 March 2004) --- The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester floats in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-11430 (March 2002) --- This artist's concept depicts the International Space Station at the conclusion of Space Shuttle Atlantis' mission STS-110 set for launch in early April. Atlantis will carry a 44-foot long segment of an external truss to the station, a girder-like cross beam seen in this image installed as planned atop the U.S. Destiny Laboratory (the module which has the V-shaped Canadarm2 at the bottom, truss segment on top). Designated the S0 truss, the first and central truss segment carried by Atlantis also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first "space railroad," allowing the station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for assembly and maintenance. Atlantis' truss section will be joined by eight additional segments to be launched aboard shuttles in the next two years to build the complete, 356-foot truss. The giant truss structure, the longest structure ever built in space, will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the station.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5816 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5823 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5824 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5822 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-703-066 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Canadarm2, moves near the S0 (S-zero) truss, newly installed on the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Ross during this fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The final major task of the spacewalk was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-59148 (16 October 2003) --- With a mockup of the defunct Russian "Buran" Space Shuttle sitting passively nearby, the Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft and its booster rocket crawl on a rail car to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan October 16, 2003, in preparation for its liftoff October 18 to carry C. Michael Foale, Expedition 8 commander and NASA science officer; Alexander Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer; and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain to the International Space Station (ISS). Photo Credit: "NASA/Bill Ingalls
International Space Sta...
2006-01-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-12415 (31 August 2005) --- Aurora Borealis and lights in Finland, Russia, Estonia and Latvia are featured in this digital still picture taken by the Expedition 11 crew aboard the International Space Station. If it were daylight parts of the Eastern Baltic Sea would be visible. The station was over a point on Earth located at 50.6 degrees north latitude and 15.1 degees east longitude at the time. The cluster of stars to the lower right of the thin crescent Moon is the Praesepe or Beehive Cluster in Cancer. Just to the right of that is the planet Saturn.
STS-69 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS069-S-001 (May 1995) --- Designed by the crewmembers, the patch for STS-69 symbolizes the multifaceted nature of the flight's mission. The primary payload, Wake Shield Facility (WSF), is represented in the center by the astronaut emblem against a flat disk. The astronaut emblem also signifies the importance of human beings in space exploration, reflected by the planned space walk to practice for International Space Station activities and to evaluate space suit design modifications. The two stylized Space Shuttles highlight the ascent and entry phases of the mission. Along with the two spiral plumes, the stylized Space Shuttles symbolize a NASA first - the deployment and recovery on the same mission of two spacecraft (both the Wake Shield Facility and the Spartan). The constellations Canis Major and Canis Minor represent the astronomy objectives of the Spartan and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH) payload. The two constellations also symbolize the talents and dedication of the support personnel who make Space Shuttle missions possible. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-28068 (February 2003) --- Canopus, the second-brightest star in the sky, is visible in this view photographed by astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, on board the International Space Station (ISS). Canopus is about 300 light years from Earth in the southern hemisphere constellation Carina and is a rare class ?F? yellow-white (7800 Kelvin) super giant. It is 65 times wider and 15,000 times more luminous than the Sun and is large enough to stretch three-fourths of the way across Mercury?s orbit.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-28028 (February 2003) --- The Southern Cross (left center), the Coal Sack Nebula (bottom left), and the Carina Nebula (upper right) are visible in this view photographed by astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, on board the International Space Station (ISS). The Carina Nebula is a molecular cloud about 9000 light years from Earth where young stars are forming. The Coal Sack Nebula is an inky-black dust cloud about 2000 light years from Earth. Stars are probably condensing deep inside the Coal Sack, but their light has not yet broken through the cloud?s dense exterior. The Southern Cross, also known as The Crux, is a constellation familiar to southern hemisphere stargazers.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-28016 (February 2003) --- The Coal Sack Nebula (bottom center), the Southern Cross (lower right), and the two prominent stars in the upper left, which are the two prominent stars of the southern constellation Centaurus, are visible in this view photographed by astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, on board the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS090-(S)-001 (December 1997) --- The STS-90 crew patch reflects the dedication of the mission to the neurosciences in celebration of the Decade of the brain. Earth is revealed through a neuron-shaped window, which symbolizes new perspectives in the understanding of nervous system development, structure and function, both here on Earth and in the microgravity environment of space. The Space Shuttle Columbia is depicted with its open payload bay doors revealing the Spacelab within. An integral component of the mission, the laboratory/science module provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), signifies the strong international involvement in the mission. The seven crew members and two alternate payload specialists, Chiaki Naito-Mukai and Alexander W. Dunlap, are represented by the nine major stars of the constellation Cetus (the whale) in recognition of the International Year of the Ocean. The distant stars illustrate the far reaching implications of the mission science to the many sponsoring agencies, helping prepare for long-duration space flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The moon and Mars are depicted to reflect the crew's recognition that those two celestial bodies will be the next great challenges in human exploration of space and represent the key role that life science research will play in supporting such missions. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.
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