REFINE 

Search Results: All Fields similar to 'Aircraft and Flight and Vehicles' and When equal to '1996'

1-50 of 108
1 2 3  
A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is viewed by personnel on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its arrival in June of 1996. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
NASA T-34C arrival at D...
June 1996
 
Description A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is viewed by personnel on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its arrival in June of 1996. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
Dryden Flight Research ...
07.02.1996
Image
 
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
28-percent scale repres...
07.02.1996
Image
 
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
March 1996
 
Description NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Dryden Flight Rese...
03.01.1996
Image
 
X-36 arrival at Dryden
X-36 arrival at Dryden
Flight Research Center ...
07.02.1996
Image
 
Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF)
Walter C. Williams Rese...
The NASA-Dryden Integra...
01.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka a...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka a...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot, Jim Smolka ...
03.01.1996
Image
 
Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft
Eclipse program QF-106 ...
This photo shows two QF...
09.23.1996
Image
 
NASA T-34C arrival at Dryden
NASA T-34C arrival at D...
A NASA T-34C aircraft, ...
06.01.1996
Image
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A side-view of an early...
August 1996
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
Sleek lines are apparen...
August 1996
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
This aft-quarter model ...
August 1996
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A front view of an earl...
August 1996
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A top front view of an ...
August 1996
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model - Front View
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A front view of an earl...
08.01.1996
Image
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model - Top Front View
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A top front view of an ...
08.01.1996
Image
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model - Side View
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
A side-view of an early...
08.01.1996
Image
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model - Side View
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
Sleek lines are apparen...
08.01.1996
Image
 
Hyper-X Vehicle Model - Top Rear View
Hyper-X Vehicle Model -...
This aft-quarter model ...
08.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE in flight from above over desert
F-15B ACTIVE in flight ...
NASA's F-15B ACTIVE res...
10.01.1996
Image
 
On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P&W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P&W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P&W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
F-15B ACTIVE - First su...
March 1996
 
Description On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P&W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P&W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P&W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P & W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P & W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P & W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
F-15B ACTIVE - First su...
March 1996
 
Description On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P & W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P & W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P & W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P&W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P&W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P&W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
F-15B ACTIVE - First su...
March 1996
 
Description On Wednesday, April 24, 1996, the F-15 Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) aircraft achieved its first supersonic yaw vectoring flight at Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. ACTIVE is a joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and Pratt & Whitney (P&W) program. The team will assess performance and technology benefits during flight test operations. Current plans call for approximately 60 flights totaling 100 hours. "Reaching this milestone is very rewarding. We hope to set some more records before we're through," stated Roger W. Bursey, P&W's pitch-yaw balance beam nozzle (PYBBN) program manager. A pair of P&W PYBBNs vectored (horizontally side-to-side, pitch is up and down) the thrust for the MDA manufactured F-15 research aircraft. Power to reach supersonic speeds was provided by two high-performance F100-PW-229 engines that were modified with the multi-directional thrust vectoring nozzles. The new concept should lead to significant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
F-15B ACTIVE with Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 engines - First supersonic yaw vectoring flight
F-15B ACTIVE with Pratt...
On Wednesday, April 24,...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE in flight from above
F-15B ACTIVE in flight ...
Sporting brilliant red,...
10.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE - First supersonic yaw vectoring flight
F-15B ACTIVE - First su...
On Wednesday, April 24,...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE - First supersonic yaw vectoring flight
F-15B ACTIVE - First su...
On Wednesday, April 24,...
03.01.1996
Image
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
Technicians unload NASA...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
June 1997
 
X-38 Drop Model: Glides...
A 4-foot-long model of ...
1995
 
X-38 Drop Model: Used t...
A 4-foot-long model of ...
1995
 
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dryden on June 4, 1997
X-38 Arrival at NASA Dr...
NASA's first X-38 Advan...
06.01.1997
Image
 
X-38 - On Ground after ...
Crew members surround t...
March 12, 1998
 
X-38 - First Free Fligh...
The X-38 Crew Return Ve...
March 12, 1998
 
X-38 - First Free Fligh...
The X-38 Crew Return Ve...
March 12, 1998
 
X-38 - First Free Fligh...
The X-38 Crew Return Ve...
March 12, 1998
 
X-38 Vehicle #132 in Fl...
The X-38, a research ve...
March 5, 1999
 
X-38 Vehicle #132 in Fl...
The X-38, a research ve...
March 5, 1999
 
X-38 Vehicle #132 in Fl...
The X-38, a research ve...
March 5, 1999
 
The X-38 Second Prototy...
The X-38, a research ve...
March 2000
 
X-38: Plywood Mockup of...
This photo shows a plyw...
December 1996
 
X-38: Parachute Caniste...
The canister containing...
December 1996
 
1-50 of 108
1 2 3