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Search Results: MediaCollectionId equal to 'NasaNAS~16~16' and When equal to '2002'

1-50 of 1,799
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STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5485 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, remove the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of the duo's crewmates on the aft flight deck.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5481 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of the duo's crewmates on the aft flight deck.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5688 (7 March 2002) --- Astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, assists astronaut Michael J. Massimino, mission specialist, with suit-donning tasks prior to the STS-109 mission's fourth space walk (EVA-4). Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman went on to install the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-093 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, temporarily hosted in the Space Shuttle Columbia?s cargo bay, is backdropped by a blue and white Earth.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-00B (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-064 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-035 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, illuminated by the sunrise, provides stark contrast to the blackness of space in this scene. Arching between the telescope and one of the solar panels is the thin line of Earth?s atmosphere.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-11430 (March 2002) --- This artist's concept depicts the International Space Station at the conclusion of Space Shuttle Atlantis' mission STS-110 set for launch in early April. Atlantis will carry a 44-foot long segment of an external truss to the station, a girder-like cross beam seen in this image installed as planned atop the U.S. Destiny Laboratory (the module which has the V-shaped Canadarm2 at the bottom, truss segment on top). Designated the S0 truss, the first and central truss segment carried by Atlantis also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first "space railroad," allowing the station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for assembly and maintenance. Atlantis' truss section will be joined by eight additional segments to be launched aboard shuttles in the next two years to build the complete, 356-foot truss. The giant truss structure, the longest structure ever built in space, will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the station.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5840 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin, STS-110 mission specialist, works in tandem with astronaut Jerry L. Ross (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5816 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5823 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5824 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5822 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored to the mobile foot restraint at the end of the International Space Station?s (ISS) Canadarm2, works in tandem with astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-E-5837 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin, STS-110 mission specialist, works in tandem with astronaut Jerry L. Ross (out of frame), mission specialist, during the fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-110 mission. The major task was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0 (S-zero) Truss. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss. Ross and Morin also installed handrails onto the S0, partially assembled a platform, installed two floodlights and performed several other tasks preparing for upcoming assembly missions.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-703-066 (16 April 2002) --- Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, STS-110 mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Canadarm2, moves near the S0 (S-zero) truss, newly installed on the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut Lee M. E. Morin (out of frame), mission specialist, worked in tandem with Ross during this fourth and final scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The final major task of the spacewalk was the installation of a beam, which is called the Airlock Spur, between the Quest Airlock and the S0. The spur will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS004-E-8174 (1 March 2002) --- This image of Columbia's STS-109 launch plume was taken by the Expedition Four crew using a digital still camera on board the International Space Station. The space station crew shot this photograph as the station flew high over the Atlantic Ocean moments before Columbia's liftoff. The shuttle's plume is visible in the right side of this image, and the plume's shadow is reflected off the clouds to the left.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08144 (1 March 2002) --- Good news concerning the anticipated launch of STS-109 reaches the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. From left, astronauts William A. Oefelein, Charles O. Hobaugh and Mark L. Polansky, obviously are pleased with the news, possibly connected to improving weather at the launch site for the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut Polansky is ascent CAPCOM and Hobaugh closely monitors the Florida weather for the CAPCOM position.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08143 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Charles O. Hobaugh, seated at the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, gives a thumbs up signal, obviously connected to improving weather at the launch site for the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut William A. Oefelein is partially obscured in the background.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08148 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Mark L. Polansky, seated at the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, talks on the communications "loop" with launch controllers in Florida about the pre-launch situation for the Space Shuttle Columbia and NASA's STS-109 mission at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Astronaut Polansky is ascent CAPCOM for the STS-109 mission.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08157 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Kent V. Rominger (seated), and LeRoy Cain are photographed at the Mission Operation Directorate (MOD) console in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston's Mission Control Center (MCC). Several hundred miles away in Florida, the STS-109 crewmembers were awaiting countdown in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). As soon as the vehicle cleared the tower in Florida, the Houston-based team of flight controllers took over the ground control of the mission. Rominger is the Deputy Director of the Flight Crew Operations Directorate (FCOD) and was the STS-109 FCOD management representative in the MCC. Cain was the Weather Flight Director for the mission?s ascent phase, coordinating weather issues for lead Ascent Flight Director John Shannon (out of frame).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08147 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Kent V. Rominger (left), Wayne Hale, and Lawrence Bourgeois (background), monitor pre-flight data at the Mission Operation Directorate (MOD) console in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston's Mission Control Center (MCC). Several hundred miles away in Florida, the STS-109 crewmembers were awaiting countdown in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). As soon as the vehicle cleared the tower in Florida, the Houston-based team of flight controllers took over the ground control of the mission. Rominger is the Deputy Director of the Flight Crew Operations Directorate (FCOD) and was the FCOD management representative in the MCC. Hale, the Deputy Chief for Space Shuttle of the Flight Director?s Office, served as the MOD management representative. Bourgeois is the Mission Operations Director in the Flight Operations Department at United Space Alliance (USA), and was the USA management representative for STS-109.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08142 (1 March 2002) --- Ascent flight director John Shannon, seated at the Flight Director console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, awaits launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut Mark L. Polansky, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), is in the background.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-31953 (23 April 2002) --- Michael Kostelnik, Deputy Associate Administrator for the Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs, addresses an announcement by Ronald D. Dittemore (out of frame) that he intends to step aside as the Space Shuttle Program Manager at the Johnson Space Center in Houston to pursue other opportunities. Dittemore, who has served as the Shuttle program manager for more than four years, will remain in his current position until the Columbia Accident Investigation Board finishes its investigation and a complete "Return to Flight" path has been established. Photo Credit: NASA/Renee Bouchard
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PD-0217 (03/01/2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Columbia emblazons the pre-dawn clouds as it soars into the sky on its 27th flight into space on STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 5:22:02:08 a.m. CST(11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five spacewalks.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PD-0263 (March 12, 2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Columbia, with its crew of seven, approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-109 to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST with mission elapsed time of 10 days, 22 hours, 11 minutes. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown an 4:32:02. It was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PD-0219 (03/01/2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Flames and smoke stream from behind Space Shuttle Columbia as it leaps off the launch pad on its 27th flight into space on STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 5:22:02:08 a.m. CST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five spacewalks.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PP-0225 (03/01/2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The smoke plume identifies the direction of Space Shuttle Columbia as it climbs into the clouds, illuminated by the Shuttle's exhaust, after launch on mission STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 5:22:02:08 a.m. CST (11:22:02:08 GMT). This was the 27th flight of the vehicle and 108th in the history of the Shuttle program. The goal of mission STS-109 is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five spacewalks.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PD-0264 (March 12, 2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Powerful xenon lights on the Shuttle Landing Facility outline the dark image of orbiter Columbia as it approaches touchdown on Runway 33. The landing completes mission STS-109 to service the Hubble Space Telescope, returning the crew of seven to Earth after a mission elapsed time of 10 days, 22 hours, 11 minutes. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown an 4:32:02. It was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PP-0224 (03/01/2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Billows of smoke and steam flow over the launch pad as Space Shuttle Columbia leaps into space on mission STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 5:22:02:08 a.m. CST (11:22:02:08 GMT). This was the 27th flight of the vehicle and 108th in the history of the Shuttle program. The goal of mission STS-109 is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five spacewalks.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-02PD-0220 (03/01/2002) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Billowing clouds of smoke are backlit by the flames streaming from behind Space Shuttle Columbia as it leaps off the launch pad on its 27th flight into space on mission STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 5:22:02:08 a.m. CST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five spacewalks.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS107-E-5103 (18 January 2002) --- The tunnel linking the SPACEHAB Research Double Module to the Space Shuttle Columbia's crew cabin provides an interesting point of view in this scene of astronaut Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist, performing work in SPACEHAB.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5002 (3 March 2002) --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, mission specialist, uses a laser ranging device designed to measure the range between two spacecraft. Linnehan positioned himself on the cabin's aft flight deck as the Space Shuttle Columbia approached the Hubble Space Telescope. A short time later, the STS-109 crew captured and latched down the giant telescope in the vehicle's cargo bay for several days of work on the Hubble. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5221 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, signals readiness for the first the first of his assigned STS-109 space walks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan later donned their helmets and the remainder pieces of their extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) space suits and egressed the Space Shuttle Columbia, eventually replacing the giant telescope?s starboard solar array during a space walk that ended at 7:38 a.m. (CST) or 13:38 GMT March 4, 2002.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5104 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is seen in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Each present set of solar array panels will be replaced during one of the space walks planned for the coming week. The crew aimed various cameras, including the digital still camera used for this frame, out the shuttle's aft flight deck windows to take a series of survey type photos, the first close-up images of the telescope since December of 1999.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5063 (3 March 2002) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino, STS-109 mission specialist, is pictured near the aft flight deck controls for the Space Shuttle Columbia shortly after the crew latched the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) into the shuttle's cargo bay. The telescope is partially visible through the cabin's rear windows. The image was taken with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5018 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5097 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is now securely latched down on a special support structure (out of frame) in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The crew aimed various cameras, including the digital still camera used for this frame, out the shuttle's aft flight deck windows to take a series of survey type photos, the first closeup images of the telescope since December of 1999.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5072 (3 March 2002) --- The top portion of the Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against dark space, just after the Space Shuttle Columbia used its 50-foot-long robotic arm to lower the telescope into its cargo bay. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera during and just after capture activities.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5014 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5053 (3 March 2002) --- The base of the Hubble Space Telescope is latched down on a special support structure in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The bay's Flight Support System, as the structure (partially visible at bottom frame)is called, will hold the telescope for the next week, turning and tilting it as needed for the spacewalking work. Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, was in control of the Shuttle's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, was at the controls of the shuttle. The crew used a digital still camera to record a series of images documenting the fourth docking of a shuttle to the giant telescope during its tenure in space.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5005 (3 March 2002) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (foreground), payload commander; and James H. Newman, mission specialist, perform tasks on the mid deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Although other tasks are being accomplished, the STS-109 crew is in a general posture of preparation for several days' space walk duty to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5035 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is visible against black space, primarily because its bright metallic disk-shaped base and the frame of its solar panels, as the Space Shuttle Columbia eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the seven-member crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5008 (3 March 2002) --- On the mid deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia, astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (foreground), payload commander, and Michael J. Massimino, mission specialist, go over a checklist concerning the next few days' scheduled space walks. Massimino's extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) space suit, which will be called into duty for the second day of extravehicular activity (EVA), is in the background. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5011 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5003 (3 March 2002) --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, mission specialist, uses a laser ranging device designed to measure the range between two spacecraft. Linnehan positioned himself on the cabin's aft flight deck as the Space Shuttle Columbia approached the Hubble Space Telescope. A short time later, the STS-109 crew captured and latched down the giant telescope in the vehicle's cargo bay for several days of work on the Hubble. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5031 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5048 (3 March 2002) --- The top portion of the Hubble Space Telescope is photographed some 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, as the Space Shuttle Columbia is about to use its 50-foot-long robotic arm to lower the telescope into its cargo bay. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5119 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is now securely latched down on a special support structure in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The bay's Flight Support System, as the structure (partially visible at bottom frame) is called, will hold the telescope for the next week, turning and tilting it as needed for the spacewalking work. The crew used a digital still camera to record a series of images documenting the fourth docking of a shuttle to the giant telescope during its tenure in space.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5225 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, signals readiness for the first the first of his assigned STS-109 space walks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan moments later egressed the Space Shuttle Columbia's airlock, eventually replacing the giant telescope?s starboard solar array during a space walk that ended at 7:38 a.m. (CST) or 13:38 GMT March 4, 2002.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5234 (4 March 2002) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (left), payload commander, and Richard M. (Rick) Linnehan, mission specialist, are just moments away from going from a crowded situation into a more spacious venue as they prepare to egress the airlock of the Space Shuttle Columbia for the first of their assigned STS-109 space walks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).The two went on to replace the giant telescope?s starboard solar array during a space walk that ended at 7:38 a.m. (CST) or 13:38 GMT March 4, 2002.
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