REFINE 

Search Results: MediaCollectionId equal to 'NasaNAS~16~16' and Where equal to 'Johnson Space Center (JSC)'

1-50 of 3,405
1 2 3  
STS-123 Shuttle Mission...
2007-06-26 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2007-E-29376 (14 June 2007) --- Crew trainer Bob Behrendsen (left) briefs astronauts Dominic L. Gorie (center) and Gregory H. Johnson, STS-123 commander and pilot, respectively, during a water survival training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near Johnson Space Center.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S75-23543 (1972) --- This Apollo 16 lunar sample (Moon rock) was collected by astronaut John W. Young, commander of the mission, about 15 meters southwest of the landing site. The rock is Apollo 16 sample no. 60016,123. It weighed 128 grams when returned to Earth. The sample is a polymict breccia. This rock, like all lunar highland breccias, is very old, about 3,900,000,000 years older than 99.99% of all Earth surface rocks. Scientific research is being conducted on the balance of this sample at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and at other research centers in the United States and certain foreign nations under a continuing program of investigation involving lunar samples collected during the Apollo Program
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S99-04195 (1995) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) Just a few kilometers from the Apollo 17 Taurus Littrow landing site, a lunar mining facility harvests oxygen from the resource-rich volcanic soil of the eastern Mare Serenitatis. Here a marketing executive describes the high iron, aluminum, magnesium, and titanium content in the processed tailings, which could be used as raw material for a lunar metals production plant. This image produced for NASA by Pat Rawlings, (SAIC). Technical concepts for NASA's Exploration Office, Johnson Space Center (JSC).
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43863 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. This view is toward the rear of the "new" room. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43842 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43985 (11 Oct. 2006) From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43860 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43851 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43986 (11 Oct. 2006) --- From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-10-21 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-46155 (16 October 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear, NEEMO-7 Topside Team member Monika Schultz from Johnson Space Center, participates in an experiment near the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration?s (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida, for the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-10-21 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-46261 (18 October 2004) --- Renowned medical pioneer Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, who visited the Johnson Space Center on October 18, pays a virtual visit to the crew of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 7. From JSC's Experimental Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC), the chancellor emeritus of Baylor College of Medicine talked with the crew and saw a demonstration of the remote telesurgery experiments of the NEEMO 7 mission in the Aquarius underwater lab off the coast of Florida. NASA aquanauts performed mock surgical procedures while linked with Canadian doctors from the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery in Hamilton, Ontario. A communication system allows aquanauts in the water to routinely converse with a ?mission control? team in the ExPOC. DeBakey also talked with an aquanauts wearing a wireless underwater communication units attached to a special full face mask while in scuba gear outside the habitat.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-10-21 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-46258 (18 October 2004) --- Renowned medical pioneer Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, who visited the Johnson Space Center on October 18, pays a virtual visit to the crew of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 7. Astronaut/aquanaut Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams accompanied the chancellor emeritus of Baylor College of Medicine. From JSC's Experimental Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC),DeBakey talked with the crew and saw a demonstration of the remote telesurgery experiments of the NEEMO 7 mission in the Aquarius underwater lab off the coast of Florida. NASA aquanauts performed mock surgical procedures while linked with Canadian doctors from the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery in Hamilton, Ontario. A communication system allows aquanauts in the water to routinely converse with a ?mission control? team in the ExPOC. DeBakey also talked with an aquanauts wearing a wireless underwater communication units attached to a special full face mask while in scuba gear outside the habitat.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-10-25 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-46539 (15 October 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear, NEEMO-7 Topside Team member Monika Schultz from Johnson Space Center, communicates with a crewmember (out of frame) during an experiment near the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration?s (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida, for the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-04-26 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-13997 (12 April 2006) --- From inside the habitat, a NEEMO-9 crewmember photographed this close-up view of simulated lunar samples (Earth rocks that geologically resemble those we know exist on the Moon) being manipulated remotely using the telerobot operated from the Center for Minimal Access Surgery (CMAS) in Ontario, Canada per instructions from the science investigators back at Johnson Space Center in Houston for the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. The crew is spending 18 days, April 3-20, on an undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration?s (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-07-27 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-30796 (22 July 2006) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut/aquanaut Koichi Wakata (right) gives a "thumbs-up" signal prior to splashdown to begin the seven-day, July 22-28, NEEMO 10 undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, which is operated by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida. Wakata leads the crew for the tenth NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. Thor Dunmire (left) of the National Undersea Research Center assisted Wakata, while Dan Sedej, Chief of Johnson Space Center's Systems Training Branch photographs the event.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2007-05-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2007-E-23436 (9 May 2007) --- Mary Sue Bell of NASA Johnson Space Center's Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Division manipulates simulated lunar samples with a two-armed remotely controlled surgical robot from the University of Washington known as Raven which is located inside the undersea habitat for the 12th NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission. In addition to hands-on telesurgery demonstrations, robotic telesurgery technology developed and refined within this mission may also double as geological sample collection and manipulation tools. The NEEMO 12 crew is spending 12 days, May 7-18, on an undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, which is operated by the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S91-52338 (1991) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) An "Artemis" - class lander, capable of delivering up to 200 kilograms to the lunar surface, has delivered a teleoperated rover to the lunar surface. The rover has surveyed the landing site for an eventual human landing. The piloted vehicle is shown in the background during the final stage of its descent. The "Artemis" robotic lunar lander is designed for cost-effective delivery of payloads to the Moon to study lunar geology, astronomy, and as a precursor to human lunar expeditions. This image was produced for NASA by Pat Rawlings. Technical concepts from NASA's Planetary Projects Office (PPO), Johnson Space Center (JSC).
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S92-49394 (1992) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) A one-meter transit telescope is shown mounted to a robotic lunar lander on the surface of the Moon. The Moon is a uniquely suitable platform for astronomy, which could include extreme ultraviolet images of Earth's magnetosphere (permitting study of solar wind interaction), the first far ultraviolet sky survey, and first-generation optical interferometers and very long wavelength radio telescopes. The instrument illustrated is a Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE), which takes advantage of the stable and atmosphere-free lunar surface, and uses the Moon's rotation to survey the ultraviolet sky. The lander is an "Artemis" - class lander capable of delivering up to 200 kilograms to the lunar surface. The "Artemis" robotic lunar lander is designed for cost-effective delivery of payloads to the Moon to study lunar geology, astronomy, and as a precursor to human lunar expeditions. This image was produced for NASA by John Frassanito and Associates. Technical concepts from NASA's Planetary Projects Office (PPO), Johnson Space Center (JSC).
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39968 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- NASA's Centaur, the half-humanoid, half-vehicle robot pictured in the foreground, is ready for a day's work in the high desert of Arizona. Centaur participated in the NASA's testing of the next generation of space equipment during the Desert RATS field test. Pictured with Centaur is NASA Ames Research Center's K-10 robot, far left, and Johnson Space Center's SCOUT rover. SCOUT -- NASA's Science Crew Operations and Utility Testbed -- is a multi-use rover able to transport both astronauts and equipment, follow verbal commands and hand signals, take direction by wireless remote control, act as communication and video relay stations and carry extra supplies.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39969 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS), a team of scientists and engineers who test futuristic equipment that may one day be used for explorations of the moon and Mars, is in the Arizona desert. In one scenario, the crew (see test subject on platform) will return to a mock way station, called a Pressurized Rover Compartment (PRC), which has been delivered to the site by Athlete, an All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer vehicle capable of "walking" over extremely rough or steep terrain. Once the crew dismounts the rover and enters the way station, a half humanoid, half vehicle robot known as Centaur will unload the day's sample collection and equipment. Another robot (K-10) will then "visually" inspect the rover. The robotic maneuvers will be controlled through a satellite link to NASA's Exploration Planning and Operations Center at JSC.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S97-08541 (30 June 1997) --- Payload specialist James A. (Jim) Pawelczyk adjusts the sensors on fellow STS-90 crew member Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams while the mission specialist is in the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device during Neurolab simulations at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The two will join four NASA astronauts and a second payload sector for 16 days aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in support of the Neurolab mission early next year.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S97-14883 (16 June 1997) --- These four payload specialists are in training for the STS-90 Neurolab mission scheduled for launch early next year. Left to right are Alexander W. Dunlap, Jay C. Buckey, Jr., James A. (Jim) Pawelczyk and Chiaki Mukai. Buckey and Pawelczyk will fly aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, while Mukai and Dunlap will provide ground support. The four were about to participate in emergency egress training in the systems integration facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC).
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S97-14912 (16 June 1997) --- These two payload specialists are in training for the STS-90 Neurolab mission. They are Jay C. Buckey Jr., left, and James A. (Jim) Pawelczyk. Alternates Chiaki Mukai and Alexander W. Dunlap are just out of view on each side of the two prime crew members. Buckey and Pawelczyk will fly aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, while Mukai and Dunlap will provide ground support. The four were about to participate in emergency egress training in the systems integration facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC).
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-04149 (3 April 1998) --- Astronaut Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams, STS-90 mission specialist, simulates a contingency space walk in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory of the Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Center. Williams, making his first flight in space in April aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, represents the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). There are no scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) duties scheduled for the Neurolab mission. However, each crew has assigned members trained for contingencies requiring work in the environment outside the shirt sleeve conditions of the crew cabin. Since the European Space Agency's (ESA) Spacelab science module is in the cargo bay, fully suited crew members would have to egresss the Space Shuttle Columbia through the tunnel connecting the module to the orbiter.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-04151 (3 April 1998) --- Two SCUBA-equipped divers assist astronaut Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams as the STS-90 mission specialist simulates a contingency space walk in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory of the Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Center. Williams, making his first flight in space in April aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, represents the Canadian Space Agency (ESA). There are no scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) duties scheduled for the Neurolab mission. However, each crew has assigned members trained for contingencies requiring work in the environment outside the shirt sleeve conditions of the crew cabin. Since the the European Space Agency's (ESA) Spacelab science module is in the cargo bay, fully suited crew members would have to egresss the Space Shuttle Columbia through the tunnel connecting the module to the orbiter.
STS-93 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-08195 (March 1998) --- Standing on a mobile platform, astronaut Catherine G. Coleman is assisted with final touches for suiting up for a training exercise in the deep pool of JSC's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). Coleman was participating in a simulation of a contingency space walk in preparation for the STS-93 mission next year. The mission specialist will join four other NASA astronauts for the Space Shuttle Columbia flight, scheduled for spring. The training version of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) that Coleman is wearing is weighted and otherwise accommodated to afford neutral buoyancy in the deep pool.
STS-93 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-09507 (6-24-98) --- Attired in a training version of the shuttle partial pressure launch and entry suit, astronaut Steven A. Hawley participates in a water survival/emergency egress training exercise in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Center. The mission specialist will join four other astronauts for a springtime 1999 mission in Earth orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-93 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-09844 (6-29-98) --- Working near the full fuselage trainer, astronaut Catherine G. Coleman simulates an emergency egress from the shuttle during a training exercise in the Johnson Space Center's Systems Integration Facility. She is assisted here by technician Rick Ortega of Johnson Engineering. The full fuselage trainer is a full-scale shuttle mockup used by crew members to prepare for their assigned missions in space. Coleman was joined by her four STS-93 crewmembers for the training session. The five are scheduled for launch aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in the spring of 1999.
STS-93 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-09838 (6-29-98) --- Astronaut Michel Tognini lowers himself from a simulated shuttle in trouble during an emergency egress training session in the Systems Integration Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Tognini, a mission specialist representing France's Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), will join four other astronauts for a scheduled five-day mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in the spring of next year.
STS-93 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-09839 (6-29-98) --- Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman lowers herself from a simulated shuttle in trouble during an emergency egress training session in the Systems Integration Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Coleman will be joined by four other astronauts for a scheduled five-day mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in the spring of next year.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2001-E-24452 (8 August 2001) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (left), STS-109 payload commander, and Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, use the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to train for some of their duties aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. This type of computer interface paired with virtual reality training hardware and software helps to prepare the entire team to perform its duties during the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2001-E-24459 (8 August 2001) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, STS-109 mission specialist, uses the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to train for some of her duties aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. This type of computer interface paired with virtual reality training hardware and software helps to prepare the entire team to perform their duties during the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08144 (1 March 2002) --- Good news concerning the anticipated launch of STS-109 reaches the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center. From left, astronauts William A. Oefelein, Charles O. Hobaugh and Mark L. Polansky, obviously are pleased with the news, possibly connected to improving weather at the launch site for the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut Polansky is ascent CAPCOM and Hobaugh closely monitors the Florida weather for the CAPCOM position.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08143 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Charles O. Hobaugh, seated at the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, gives a thumbs up signal, obviously connected to improving weather at the launch site for the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut William A. Oefelein is partially obscured in the background.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08148 (1 March 2002) --- Astronaut Mark L. Polansky, seated at the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, talks on the communications "loop" with launch controllers in Florida about the pre-launch situation for the Space Shuttle Columbia and NASA's STS-109 mission at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Astronaut Polansky is ascent CAPCOM for the STS-109 mission.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2002-E-08142 (1 March 2002) --- Ascent flight director John Shannon, seated at the Flight Director console in the Shuttle Flight Control Room of the Johnson Space Center's Mission Control Center, awaits launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia several hundred miles away in Florida. Astronaut Mark L. Polansky, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), is in the background.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-03531 (1 February 2003) --- In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a massive collection of flowers, balloons, flags, signs, and other arrangements were placed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) sign at the main entrance to the center.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-03507 (1 February 2003) --- The United States, Texas, and NASA flags, in front of the Johnson Space Center?s (JSC) Project Management Facility (Bldg. 1), fly at half-mast in memory of the seven Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-04031 (1 February 2003) --- In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a number of signs, U.S. flags, and flowers were placed on the fences near the main entrance at the Johnson Space Center (JSC).
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-02604 (16 January 2003) --- Robert E. (Bob) Castle (right), Deputy Chief for ISS, Flight Director Office; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Deputy Chief of JSC's Astronaut Office; and Scott Hartwig, USA's Deputy Associate Program Manager for Flight Operations are pictured in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston's Mission Control Center (MCC). At the time this photo was taken the Space Shuttle Columbia was about to launch at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Columbia launched at 9:39 a.m. (CST) on January 16, 2003. Once the vehicle cleared the tower in Florida, the Houston-based team of flight controllers took over the ground control of the STS-107 flight.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-03368 (1 February 2003) --- An overall view of the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston?s Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). At the time this photo was taken, flight controllers had just lost contact with the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-02611 (16 January 2003) --- Flight Director Phil Engelauf (right); Robert E. (Bob) Castle, Deputy Chief for ISS, Flight Director Office; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Deputy Chief of JSC's Astronaut Office; and Scott Hartwig, USA's Deputy Associate Program Manager for Flight Operations are pictured in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) in Houston's Mission Control Center (MCC). At the time this photo was taken the Space Shuttle Columbia was about to launch at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Columbia launched at 9:39 a.m. (CST) on January 16, 2003. Once the vehicle cleared the tower in Florida, the Houston-based team of flight controllers took over the ground control of the STS-107 flight.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05910 (4 February 2003) --- Holly Leonard is pictured among the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05920 (4 February 2003) --- Kent V. Rominger, who had served as the mission commander on the initial mission of the late astronaut Rick D. Husband of the STS-107 Columbia crew, remembers Husband and other crew members during a memorial service at the Johnson Space Center.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05899 (4 February 2003) --- Captain Gene Theriot (left), Chaplain Corps (USN) and Rabbi Harold Robinson, Captain, Chaplain Corps (USNR), recite the 23rd Psalm in English and Hebrew to the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts. NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe is at right.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05917 (4 February 2003) --- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe at the lectern during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts at the Johnson Space Center.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05903 (4 February 2003) --- T-38's from nearby Ellington Field overfly JSC during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts in the mall of the Johnson Space Center. The aircraft later assumed the missing man formation.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05938 (4 February 2003) --- President George W. Bush addresses the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts. Seated from the left are Captain Gene Theriot, Chaplain Corps (USN); NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe; and astronaut Kent V. Rominger, Chief of the Astronaut Office. A portrait of the STS-107 Columbia crew is visible at left.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-05924 (4 February 2003) --- A partial view of the crowd on the mall of the Johnson Space Center during the memorial for the Columbia astronauts.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-04037 (1 February 2003) --- In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a massive collection of flowers, balloons, flags, signs, and other arrangements were placed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) sign at the main entrance to the center.
1-50 of 3,405
1 2 3