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Search Results: All Fields similar to 'Aircraft and Flight and Vehicles'

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A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is viewed by personnel on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its arrival in June of 1996. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
NASA T-34C arrival at D...
June 1996
 
Description A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is viewed by personnel on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after its arrival in June of 1996. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
PA-30 Twin Comanche - NASA 808 in flight
PA-30 Twin Comanche - N...
Dryden Flight Research ...
01.01.1979
Image
 
The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
Integrated Test Facilit...
March 27, 1992
 
Description The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
Integrated Test Facilit...
November 10, 1991
 
Description The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
The F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles) in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, Sept. 18, 1995. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of the thrust vectoring nozzles seen here, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
F-15B ACTIVE showing th...
September 18, 1995
 
Description The F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles) in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, Sept. 18, 1995. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of the thrust vectoring nozzles seen here, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
X-38 Ship #2 Release from B-52
X-38 Ship #2 Release fr...
Lifting Bodies
07/01/1999
NASA Carla Thomas
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Super Guppy at the Redstone Airstrip
Super Guppy at the Reds...
1965-01-01
 
Helios Prototype on Lakebed
Helios Prototype on Lak...
Unique Aircraft
11/01/1999
NASA Tom Tschida
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Perseus B Heads for Lan...
The Perseus B remotely ...
April 30, 1997
 
Range safety and phased...
Range safety and phased...
February 26, 2007
 
New range safety and ra...
New range safety and ra...
February 26, 2007
 
Two small Range Safety ...
Two small Range Safety ...
February 26, 2007
 
NASA's highly modified ...
NASA's highly modified ...
February 26, 2007
 
NASA's highly modified ...
NASA's highly modified ...
February 2, 2007
 
This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
F-15B ACTIVE test stand
13 Nov 1995
 
Description This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
X-36 Being Prepared on Lakebed for First Flight
X-36 Being Prepared on ...
28-percent scale repres...
05.17.1997
Image
 
X-36 Taking off During First Flight
X-36 Taking off During ...
28-percent scale repres...
05.17.1997
Image
 
X-36 during First Flight
X-36 during First Fligh...
Research Center in 1997...
05.17.1997
Image
 
X-36 arrival at Dryden
X-36 arrival at Dryden
Flight Research Center ...
07.02.1996
Image
 
X-36 in Flight over Mojave Desert
X-36 in Flight over Moj...
28-percent scale repres...
10.30.1997
Image
 
Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF)
Walter C. Williams Rese...
The NASA-Dryden Integra...
01.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka a...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles on test stand at sunrise
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
This November 13, 1995,...
11.13.1995
Image
 
Perseus A, Part of the ...
The Perseus A remotely-...
December 21, 1993
 
Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft in flight, view from tanker
Eclipse program QF-106 ...
View of QF-106 airplane...
01.01.1997
Image
 
Hyper-X Research Vehicl...
This artist?s concept d...
1997
 
Helios Prototype and Pa...
Helios Prototype and Pa...
October 14, 1999
 
Computational Fluid Dyn...
This computational flui...
1997
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka a...
03.01.1996
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Pilot, Jim Smolka ...
03.01.1996
Image
 
The jagged ridges of So...
The jagged ridges of So...
February 26, 2007
 
NASA's F-15B (upper right), later used for aerodynamic flight research, is seen here with the F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft, on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Currently being flown by Dryden in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the F/A-18B has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, air data sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 reusable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on the Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
F-15B and F-18 SRA in f...
July 10, 1993
 
Description NASA's F-15B (upper right), later used for aerodynamic flight research, is seen here with the F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft, on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Currently being flown by Dryden in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the F/A-18B has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, air data sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 reusable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on the Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
Integrated Test Facility (ITF)
Integrated Test Facilit...
The NASA-Dryden Integra...
01.01.1992
Image
 
Integrated Test Facility (ITF)
Integrated Test Facilit...
The NASA-Dryden Integra...
01.01.1991
Image
 
Eclipse program F-106 aircraft in flight, front view
Eclipse program F-106 a...
Shot of the QF-106 airc...
08.01.1997
Image
 
X-38 Ship #2 in Free Fl...
The X-38 research vehic...
July 1999
 
A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden
A NASA F/A-18, particip...
A NASA F/A-18 is partic...
12.11.2002
Image
 
A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden
A NASA F/A-18, particip...
A NASA F/A-18 is partic...
12.11.2002
Image
 
Employees atop NASA Dry...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
Attached to the same B-...
September 27, 2004
 
Attached to the same B-...
September 27, 2004
 
NASA's Dryden Flight Re...
July 20, 2007
 
X-36 on Ramp
X-36 on Ramp
Flight Research at ARC
07/16/1997
NASA
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Spin Research Vehicle (...
This in-flight photo of...
1981
 
F-15B ACTIVE test stand
F-15B ACTIVE test stand
This November 13, 1995,...
11.13.1995
Image
 
Pegasus Rocket Booster ...
A close-up view of the ...
August 25, 1999
 
Hyper-X Research Vehicl...
An artist?s conception ...
1997
 
Hyper-X Research Vehicl...
This is an artist's dep...
1997
 
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