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Inside the Vertical Processing Facility, the Chandra X-ray Observatory sits inside the payload canister, ready to be moved to Launch Pad 39B. Liftoff will take place no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe, map the location of dark matter and help to identify it, and probe the faintest of active galaxies, allowing scientists to study not only how their energy output changes with time, but also how these objects produce their intense energy emissions in the first place. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe
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Inside the Vertical Processing Facility, doors on the payload canister begin to close on the Chandra X-ray Observatory inside before being moved to Launch Pad 39B. Liftoff will take place no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe, map the location of dark matter and help to identify it, and probe the faintest of active galaxies, allowing scientists to study not only how their energy output changes with time, but also how these objects produce their intense energy emissions in the first place. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Yvonne Cagle (left); Jennifer Harris (center); the Mars 2001 Operations System Development Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and Astronaut Ellen Ochoa (right) participate in a panel about "Past, Present and Future of Space," held at a women's forum in the Apollo/Saturn V Center. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges and remarks by Donna Shalala, secretary of Department of Health and Human Services. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing site. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The fiery launch of Space Shuttle Columbia is reflected in the water near the Launch Complex . After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Reflected in the waters near Launch Pad 39-B, Space Shuttle Columbia rockets into the night sky on mission STS-93. After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT.. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-100 crew gives thumbs up on launch as they gather near Launch Pad 39A to greet family and friends. Starting at left, they are Mission Specialists Chris A. Hadfield, John L. Phillips and Umberto Guidoni; Commander Kent V. Rominger; Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski and Yuri V. Lonchakov. Hadfield is with the Canadian Space Agency; Guidoni is with the European Space Agency; and Lonchakov is with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. In the background on the pad can be seen the tips of Space Shuttle Endeavour?s orange external tank and white solid rocket boosters. The 80-foot lightning rod towers above the Shuttle and service structures. The crew is at KSC to complete final flight plan reviews in anticipation of launch. The 11-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator system and the UHF Antenna, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS. The mission is also the inaugural flight of the MPLM Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen from behind the mobile launcher platform, the orange external tank and solid rocket boosters all but hide Atlantis. The crawlerway stretches in a curve on the other side. The shuttle is being rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be examined for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., participates in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in front of the Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device (RRMD) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nineday flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its sevenmember crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members and technicians participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in front of the back cap of the SPACEHAB module at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working onorbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A
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Attendees of a women's forum held at the Apollo/Saturn V Center, get a guided tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges, remarks by NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, and a panel discussion, "Past, Present and Future of Space." The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing sight. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After her performance at the Apollo/Saturn V Center, country western recording artist Teresa gets a congratulatory hug from NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin. Teresa performed a song, "Brave New Girls," written for astronaut Catherine "Cady" Coleman, mission specialist on STS-93. She entertained participants and attendees of a women's forum held in the center earlier in the day. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing sight. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, country music recording artist Teresa performs a song, "Brave New Girls," written for astronaut Catherine "Cady" Coleman, mission specialist on STS-93. She entertains participants and attendees of a women's forum held in the center. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing sight. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT
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Attendees of a women's forum held at the Apollo/Saturn V Center, get a guided tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility and a closeup look at an orbiter overhead. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges, remarks by NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, and a panel discussion, "Past, Present and Future of Space." The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing sight. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers them into the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (second from left) and James H. Newman (second from right) do a sharp-edge inspection. At their right is Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Below them is the Orbiter Docking System, the remote manipulator system arm and a tunnel into the payload bay. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bucket inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (far right) and James H. Newman (second from right) get a close look at the Orbiter Docking System. At left is the bucket operator and Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. The STS-88 crew members are in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to participate in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. While on orbit during STS-88, Unity will be latched atop the Orbiter Docking System in the forward section of Endeavour's payload bay for the mating of the two modules. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A on NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Discovery is fully revealed after rollback of the rotating service structure, at far left. Next to it is the fixed service structure, or FSS, with the 80-foot-tall lightning mast on top. Extending from the FSS to the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the structure, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room. Rollback of the RSS started at 3:34 p.m. EDT and was complete at 4:20 p.m. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Rollback of the pad's RSS is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-120. Discovery is scheduled for liftoff at 11:38 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23. The mission will be the 23rd assembly flight to the International Space Station and the 34th flight for Discovery. Payload on the mission is the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The 14-day mission will install Harmony and move the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position and deploy them. Discovery is expected to complete its mission and return home at 4:47 a.m. EST on Nov. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A on NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Discovery is fully revealed after rollback of the rotating service structure. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the fixed service structure. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the structure, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room. Rollback of the RSS started at 3:34 p.m. EDT and was complete at 4:20 p.m. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Rollback of the pad's RSS is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-120. Discovery is scheduled for liftoff at 11:38 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23. The mission will be the 23rd assembly flight to the International Space Station and the 34th flight for Discovery. Payload on the mission is the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The 14-day mission will install Harmony and move the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position and deploy them. Discovery is expected to complete its mission and return home at 4:47 a.m. EST on Nov. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A on NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Discovery is fully revealed after rollback of the rotating service structure. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the fixed service structure. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the structure, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room. Rollback of the RSS started at 3:34 p.m. EDT and was complete at 4:20 p.m. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. Rollback of the pad's RSS is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-120. Discovery is scheduled for liftoff at 11:38 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23. The mission will be the 23rd assembly flight to the International Space Station and the 34th flight for Discovery. Payload on the mission is the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The 14-day mission will install Harmony and move the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position and deploy them. Discovery is expected to complete its mission and return home at 4:47 a.m. EST on Nov. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last meeting before launch of mission STS-93 on July 20. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (left) and James H. Newman (right foreground) get a close look at the Orbiter Docking System. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. While on orbit during STS-88, Unity will be latched atop the Orbiter Docking System in the forward section of Endeavour's payload bay for the mating of the two modules. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The tugboat towing the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, passes through a drawbridge on its voyage to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tugboat tows the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tugboat maneuvers the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, toward the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, moves slowly toward its destination, the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin, propelled by two tugboats. At left in the background is Launch Pad 39A. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, is finally docked at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, moves slowly toward its destination, the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin, propelled by two tugboats. At left in the background is Launch Pad 39A. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
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The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
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The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
The Space Shuttle Discovery cuts a bright swath through the early-morning darkness as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on a scheduled 10-day flight to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Liftoff of Mission STS-82 occurred on-time at 3:55:17 a.m. EST, Feb. 11, 1997. Leading the veteran crew is Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox. Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz is the pilot. Mark C. Lee is the payload commander. Rounding out the seven-member crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Gregory J. Harbaugh, Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven A. Hawley. Four of the astronauts will be divided into two teams to perform the scheduled four back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks. Lee and Smith will team up for EVAs 1 and 3 on flight days 4 and 6; Harbaugh and Tanner will perform EVAs 2 and 4 on flight days 5 and 7. Among the tasks will be to replace two outdated scientific instruments with two new instruments the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). This is the second servicing mission for HST, which was originally deployed in 1990 and designed to be serviced on-orbit about every three years. Hubble was first serviced in 1993. STS-82 is the second of eight planned flights in 1997. It is the 22nd flight of Discovery and the 82nd Shuttle mission
The Space Shuttle Disco...
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