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101-150 of 15,490
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2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-134-20380 (13 December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, salutes the deployed United States flag on the lunar surface during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) of NASA's final lunar landing mission in the Apollo series. The Lunar Module (LM) is at left background and the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) also in background, is partially obscured. The photo was made by astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While astronaut's Cernan and Schmitt descended in the LM "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-134-20425 (11 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, collects lunar rake samples at Station 1 during the first Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-1) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene Cernan, commander. The lunar rake, an Apollo lunar geology hand tool, is used to collect discrete samples of rocks and rock chips ranging in size from one-half inch (1.3 centimeter) to one inch (2.5 centimeter).
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-134-20476 (13 December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, approaches the parked Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the lunar surface during the flight's third period of Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3). South Massif can be seen in the background. The photograph was taken with a hand-held Hasselblad camera by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While the two explored the surface of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-152-23393 (17 December 1972)--- Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The cylindrical object at Evans' left side is the Mapping Camera cassette. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 18 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at ground elapsed timed of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-152-23311 (December 1972) --- This full disc of the Moon was photographed by the Apollo 17 crewmen during their transearth coast homeward following a successful lunar landing mission in December 1972. Mare seen on this photo include Serentatis, Tranquillitatis, Nectaris, Foecunditatis and Crisium.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-140-21493 (13 December 1972) --- The Apollo 17 Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is photographed near a large lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. About half of the boulder is captured in this scene, photographed by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander. While astronauts Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the lunar surface, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command And Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-145-22157 (12 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot, uses an adjustable sampling scoop to retrieve lunar samples during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-2), at Station 5 at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. A gnomon is atop the large rock in the foreground. The gnomon is a stadia rod mounted on a tripod, and serves as an indicator of the gravitational vector and provides accurate vertical reference and calibrated length for determining size and position of objects in near-field photographs. The color scale of blue, orange and green is used to accurately determine color for photography. The rod of it is 18 inches long. The scoop Dr. Schmitt is using is 11 3/4 inches long and is attached to a tool extension which adds a potential 30 inches of length to the scoop. The pan portion, obscured in this view, has a flat bottom, flanged on both sides with a partial cover on the top. It is used to retrieve sand, dust and lunar samples too small for the tongs, another geological tool used by the astronauts. The pan and the adjusting mechanism are made of stainless steel and the handle is made of aluminum. Within the foreground of this scene, three lunar samples were taken--numbers 75060, 75075 and 75080. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, crew commander, was using a 60mm lens on the 70mm Hasselblad camera and type SO-368 film to take this photograph.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-146-22294 (13 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed working beside a huge boulder at Station 6 (base of North Massif) during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The front portion of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is visible on the left. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander. Schmitt is the lunar module pilot. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-145-22224 (12 December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, is photographed inside the lunar module on the lunar surface following the second extravehicular activity (EVA-2) of his mission. Note lunar dust on his suit. The photograph was taken by astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, using a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera and S0-368 film.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-145-22183 (7 - 19 December 1972) --- One of the Apollo 17 crew took this picture of a large boulder field during lunar surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view is looking northeast. Apollo 17 was the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo Program. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-140-21497 (13 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. Schmitt is the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander. While Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-146-22296 (13 December 1972) --- Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, works near the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow site on the lunar surface. The front part of the LRV is out of frame at left, but the seats and several geological tools can be seen. The photo was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-152-23391 (17 December 1972) --- Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity during the Apollo 17 spacecraft's trans-earth coast. During his EVA, Evans, command module pilot, retrieved film cassettes from the lunar sounder, mapping camera and panoramic camera. The cylindrical object at Evans' left side is the mapping camera cassette. The total time for the trans-earth EVA was one hour, seven minutes, 18 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at G.E.T. of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-152-23272 (December 1972) --- The crescent Earth rises above the lunar horizon in this photograph taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar-orbit during National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-147-22526 (11 December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander, makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the early part of the first Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-1) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view of the "stripped down" LRV is prior to loading up. Equipment later loaded onto the LRV included the ground-controlled television assembly, the lunar communications relay unit, hi-gain antenna, low-gain antenna, aft tool pallet, lunar tools and scientific gear. This photograph was taken by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. The mountain in the right background is the east end of South Massif. While astronaut's Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-163-24148 (December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (left) and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. "Jack" Schmitt are photographed by the third crew man aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft during the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, took this picture. Cernan was the mission commander. Schmitt served as the lunar module pilot.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-162-24049 (December 1972) --- A fellow crewman took this picture of astronaut Eugene A. Cernan dozing aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft during the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. Also, aboard Apollo 17 were astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. "Jack" Schmitt, lunar module pilot. Cernan was the mission commander.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description the three white stars symbolize the three astronaut crew men. The background is deep blue space and within it are the Moon, the planet Saturn and a spiral galaxy or nebula. The Moon is partially overlaid by the eagle's wing suggesting that this is a celestial body that man has visited and in that sense conquered. The thrust of the eagle and the gaze of Apollo to the right and toward Saturn and the galaxy is meant to imply that man's goals in space will someday include the planets and perhaps the stars. The colors of the emblem are red, white and blue, the colors of our flag; with the addition of gold, to symbolize the golden age of space flight that will begin with this Apollo 17 lunar landing. The Apollo image used in this emblem was the famous Apollo of Belvedere sculpture now in the Vatican Gallery in Rome. This emblem was designed by artist Robert T. McCall in collaboration with the astronauts. This is the official Apollo 17 emblem, a property of the government of the United States. It has been authorized only for use by the astronauts. Its reproduction in any form other than in news, information and education media is not authorized without approval. Unauthorized use is subject to the provisions of Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 701.
astronaut Ronald E. Eva...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. Flame from the five F-1 engines of the Apollo/Saturn first (S-1C) stage illuminates the nighttime scene. A two-hour and forty-minute hold delayed the Apollo 17 launching.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S72-48888 (September 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene a Cernan (left), commander, and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, simulate collecting lunar samples during extravehicular activity training at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Astronauts Cernan, Schmitt, and Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, are the prime crewmen of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S72-55834 (19 December 1972) --- The Apollo 17 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully concludes the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. (CST) December 19, 1972, at coordinates of 166 degrees 8 minutes west longitude and 27 degrees 53 minutes south latitude, about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands. The splashdown was only .8 miles from the target point. Later, the three crewmen were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Ticonderoga.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S72-55937 (19 December 1972) --- The three Apollo 17 crew members arrive aboard the prime recovery ship, the U.S.S. Ticonderoga, to successfully conclude the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. They are astronauts Eugene A. Cernan (waving), Harrison H. Schmitt (on Cernan's left), and Ronald E. Evans (standing in back). VIP's, dignitaries, officials and Navy personnel gave the three crew men a red-carpet welcome. Apollo 17 splashed down at 1:24:59 p.m. (CST), December 19, 1972, about 350 nautical miles southeast of Samoa.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S72-48891 (September 1972) --- Two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission participate in lunar surface extravehicular activity simulation training at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt (foreground), lunar module pilot, simulates scooping up lunar sample material. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (background), commander, holds a sample bag.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S73-22871 (13 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), which transported Schmitt and Eugene A. Cernan to this extravehicular station from their Lunar Module (LM), is seen in the background. The mosaic is made from two frames from Apollo 17 Hasselblad magazine 140. The two frames were photographed by Cernan.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description Ronald E. Evans (standing on right), command module pilot; and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. They are photographed with a Lunar Roving Vehicle trainer. Cernan and Schmitt will use an LRV during their exploration of the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Apollo 17 Saturn V space vehicle is in the background. This picture was taken at Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S72-44420 (8 June 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission, prepares to remove a traverse gravimeter training mock-up from a Lunar Roving Vehicle for deployment during lunar surface extravehicular activity simulations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida.
S73-34103 (1973) --- We...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S99-04195 (1995) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) Just a few kilometers from the Apollo 17 Taurus Littrow landing site, a lunar mining facility harvests oxygen from the resource-rich volcanic soil of the eastern Mare Serenitatis. Here a marketing executive describes the high iron, aluminum, magnesium, and titanium content in the processed tailings, which could be used as raw material for a lunar metals production plant. This image produced for NASA by Pat Rawlings, (SAIC). Technical concepts for NASA's Exploration Office, Johnson Space Center (JSC).
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS17-134-20384 (December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, is photographed next to the deployed United States flag during lunar surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The highest part of the flag appears to point toward our planet Earth in the distant background. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
S69-42255 (28 October 1...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-42255 (28 October 1968) --- Dr. Robert R. Gilruth talks about the Apollo 6 unmanned mission's returned spacecraft during a visit to Houston by vice-presidential nominee Spiro T. Agnew.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43863 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. This view is toward the rear of the "new" room. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43842 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43985 (11 Oct. 2006) From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43860 (6 Oct. 2006)--- International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43851 (6 Oct. 2006)--- Astronaut Julie Payette, spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), and John McCullough, flight director, support the Expedition 14 mission. International Space Station flight controllers have this area as their new home with increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-11 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-43986 (11 Oct. 2006) --- From left, Daniel C. Brandenstein, Mission Support Operations Contract program manager, Lockheed Martin; Christopher C. Kraft Jr., former JSC director and NASA's first flight director; Milt Heflin, deputy director of Mission Operations; Michael Coats, JSC director; John McCullough (at lectern, background), lead International Space Station flight director; and Allen Flynt, director of Mission Operations, cut a ribbon, formally opening a new work area for space station flight controllers. The new home offers increased technical capabilities, more workspace and a long, distinguished history. The newly updated facility is just down the hall from its predecessor at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston. Known as Flight Control Room 1, it was first used to control a space flight 38 years ago today, the mission of Apollo 7 launched Oct. 11, 1968. It was one of two control rooms for NASA's manned missions. The room it replaces in its new ISS role, designated the Blue Flight Control Room, had been in operation since the first station component was launched in 1998.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45587 (28 June 2003) --- Inside the Aquarius research habitat, a curious astronaut Clayton C. Anderson smiles as he is greeted by an equally curious school of marine fish on the other side of the habitat viewing port in waters off the Florida Keys. The NEEMO 5 mission was headed toward the final 24 hours of underwater research and evaluation. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-13 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-43950 (16-29 June 2003) --- Astronaut/aquanaut Peggy A. Whitson searches near ocean floor while performing an extravehicular activity near the Aquarius research habitat off the Florida Keys.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45592 (27 June 2003) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear in waters off the Florida Keys, two NEEMO 5 crew members look toward the viewing port of the Aquarius research habitat, from which one of their crewmates recorded this photograph. Seen are astronaut Peggy A. Whitson (foreground), mission commander, and Clayton C.Anderson. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45588 (28 June 2003) --- NASA scientist Emma Hwang, an aquanaut on the NEEMO 5 team aboard the Aquarius research habitat beneath waters off the Florida Keys, watches a school of marine fish on the other side of the habitat's viewing port. The NEEMO 5 mission was headed toward the final 24 hours of underwater research and evaluation. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45591 (27 June 2003) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear in waters off the Florida Keys, the NEEMO 5 crew members congregate near the viewing port of the Aquarius research habitat. Astronaut Garrett E. Reisman, is at center foreground. Others, left to right, are NASA scientist Emma Hwang and astronauts Clayton C. Anderson and Peggy A. Whitson, mission commander. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45590 (27 June 2003) --- The NEEMO 5 crew members are pictured in the bunkroom aboard the Aquarius research habitat, as their mission winds down. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight. They are (top, left to right) astronaut Garrett E. Reisman and NASA scientist Emma Hwang; (middle) astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, commander; and Clayton C. Anderson; and (bottom) habitat technicians James Talacek and Ryan Snow, employees of the National Undersea Research Center (NURC).
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45589 (28 June 2003) --- Inside the Aquarius research habitat astronaut Garrett E Reisman surveys a school of marine fish on the other side of the habitat viewing port in waters off the Florida Keys. The NEEMO 5 mission was headed toward the final 24 hours of underwater research and evaluation. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-45593 (27 June 2003) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear in waters off the Florida Keys, astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, the NEEMO 5 crew commander, joins a school of marine fish near the viewing port of the Aquarius research habitat. The crew spent 14 days June 16-29, 2003, in the undersea habitat owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, testing its fidelity as an analog for long-duration space flight.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-44672 (June 2003) --- Aquanaut Emma Hwang monitors medical data on a laptop in the Aquarius research Habitat for NEEMO 5. This fifth mission of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation is the longest and most challenging mission to date. The NEEMO 5 mission began at the Florida Keys site with splashdown on June 16 and will end with decompression and splash-up on Sunday, June 29.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-44670 (22 June 2003) --- Astronaut Clayton C. Anderson, serving as an aquanaut on the NEEM0 5 mission, checks a bacterial swab sample in the Aquarius research habitat. This fifth mission of NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation is the longest and most challenging mission to date. The NEEMO 5 mission began at the Florida Keys site with splashdown on June 16 and will end with decompression and splash-up on Sunday, June 29.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-28737 (July 2004) --- Four NASA crewmembers will look to the deep seas this month to help prepare for journeys into deep space. They'll use an undersea laboratory to study what it may be like to live and work in other extreme environments, such as the Moon and Mars. Astronaut John Herrington (left) will lead the crew in an undersea mission July 12-21 that will field-test equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. Astronauts Doug Wheelock (right) and Nick Patrick (second right) will join Herrington, a veteran space flier and spacewalker; and biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley in the Aquarius Underwater Laboratory off the coast of Key Largo, Fla., for the mission. University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) systems engineers Craig Cooper (not pictured) and Joe March (not pictured) will work side by side with the NASA crew in Aquarius.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29676 (12 July 2004) --- Biomedical Engineer Tara Ruttley participates in a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA) along with her NEEMO-6 crewmates. The crew?s first objective was a two-hour underwater EVA to a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat off the Florida Keys to survey the area for future coral science operations. The crew is spending 10 days, July 12-21, 2004, field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29677 (12 July 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear in waters off the Florida Keys, astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, NEEMO-6 commander, participates in a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). The crew?s first objective was an underwater EVA to a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat to survey the area for future coral science operations. Herrington is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2004-07-15 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-29678 (12 July 2004) --- Equipped with SCUBA gear, the NEEMO-6 crewmembers leave the Aquarius habitat to begin a two-hour underwater extravehicular activity (EVA). Their destination was a site about 900 feet from the Aquarius habitat to survey the area for future coral science operations. Astronaut/aquanaut John Herrington, commander, is leading the crew in the undersea mission July 12-21 that is field-testing equipment and technology for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. From the left are astronauts Herrington and Doug Wheelock, biomedical engineer Tara Ruttley and astronaut Nick Patrick.
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