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Search Results: MediaCollectionId equal to 'NasaNAS~16~16'

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Description Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
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Description S72-55417 (1972) --- A close-up view of the plaque which the Apollo 17 astronauts will leave behind on the Moon during their lunar landing mission. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit. The seven by nine inch stainless steel plaque will be attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the LM's descent stage. Commerative plaques were also left on the Moon from Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 astronauts.
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Description AS12-47-6921 (November 19, 1969) - Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, aligns the antenna on the Central Station for the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity. The ALSEP's Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) is in the foreground. In the center background near Conrad are other ALSEP components.
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Description AS12-47-6988 (11/19/69) - Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, stands at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assemble (MESA) on the Lunar Module during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) on the lunar surface. The erectable S-band antenna is already deployed at right. The carrier for the Apollo Lunar Hand Tools (ALHT) is near Conrad.
AS12-47-6897 (19 Novemb...
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Description AS12-48-7149 (11/20/69) - A close-up view of Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, photographed during the extravehicular activity (EVA) on the surface of the Moon. An EVA checklist is on Conrad's left wrist. A set of tongs, an Apollo Lunar Hand Tool (ALHT), is held in his right hand. Several footprints can be seen. Note lunar soil on the suit of Conrad, especially around the knees and below.
Apollo 12 (Ocean of Sto...
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Description S69-55662 (10/10/69) - Astronauts Alan L. Bean (left) and Charles Conrad Jr., two crewmen of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, are pictured during a geological field trip and training at a simulated lunar surface area near Flagstaff, Arizona. Bean and Conrad are scheduled to participate in extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. Here, Conrad gets a close look through hand lens at the stratography of a man-dug hole while Bean looks on.
S69-38866 (09/22/69) - ...
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Description S69-38866 (09/22/69) - Portrait of Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Prime Crew Commander of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Mission, in his space suit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.
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Description S69-60424 (29 November 1969) Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, holds two lunar rocks which were among the samples brought back from the Moon by the Apollo 12 astronauts. The samples are under scientific examination in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory.
S69-38852 (22 September...
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Description S69-38852 (22 September 1969) - These three astronauts were named as the prime crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. Left to right, are Charles Conrad Jr., Richard F. Gordon Jr., and Alan L. Bean.
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Description S69-39600 (20 July 1969) --- Four members of the prime and backup crews for Apollo 12 monitor activity the first moon landing mission from consoles in the Mission Control Center in Houston. Left to right are astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., Alan L. Bean, David R. Scott and James B. Irwin. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin had already landed on the Moon when the photo was taken.
S69-52992 (20 September...
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Description S69-52992 (20 September 1969) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander for Apollo 12, relaxes aboard the NASA motor vessel retriever prior to participating in water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Description S69-62884 (12/10/69) - Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, makes several remarks publicly in response to the welcome given him and other members of the Apollo 12 crew upon their release from post-mission isolation in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). Pictured with Conrad outside bldg 37, which houses the LRL, are his fellow crewmen Astronauts Alan L. Bean (left) and Richard F. Gordon Jr.
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Description AS16-110-17961 (22 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young replaces tools in the Apollo Lunar Hand Tool (ALHT) carrier at the aft end of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) on the high side of Stone Mountain at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. took this photograph near the conclusion of Station 4 activities. Smoky Mountain, with the large Ravine Crater on its flank, is in the left background. This view is looking northeast.
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Description AS16-109-17804 (21 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, stands on the rim of Plum Crater while collecting lunar samples at Station 1 during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Descartes landing site. This scene, looking eastward, was photographed by astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. The small boulder in the center foreground was chip sampled by the crew. Plum Crater is 40 meters in diameter and 10 meters deep (1 meter equals 39.37 inches). The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked on the far rim of the crater. The gnomon, which is used as a photographic reference to establish local vertical Sun angle, scale, and lunar color, is deployed in the center of the picture. Young holds a geological hammer in his right hand.
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Description AS16-106-17340 (23 April 1972)--- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples near North Ray crater during the third Apollo 16 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module (LM) pilot. Young is using the lunar surface rake and a set of tongs. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked in the field of large boulders in the background. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Lunar Module "Orion" to explore the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar-orbit.
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Description AS16-113-18289 (16 - 27 April 1972) --- Earth rises over the lunar horizon, with the Apollo 16 Command and Services Modules (CSM) to the left of the Earth. This photograph was taken from the Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" before the two Apollo 16 spacecraft re-joined following the CSM's failure to make the circularization burn on April 20, 1972. Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, was inside the CSM "Casper", while astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, were manning the LM. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the LM to explore the Descartes region of the Moon, astronaut Mattingly remained with the CSM in lunar orbit.
descended in the Apollo...
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Description descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module ?Orion? to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules ?Casper? in lunar orbit.
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Description AS16-113-18334 (21 April 1972) --- View of the Lunar Module (LM) ?Orion? parked on the lunar surface. During their post mission press conference, the Apollo 16 crew members called attention to the steerable S-band antenna, which was "frozen" in a yaw axis during much of the flight. This view of the LM was photographed by astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., the lunar module pilot, during the mission's first extravehicular activity (EVA-1). Astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Duke had earlier descended in the LM to explore the Descartes region of the Moon, while astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) ?Casper? in lunar orbit.
descended in the Apollo...
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Description descended in the Apollo 16 LM ?Orion? to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) ?Casper? in lunar orbit.
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Description AS16-107-17446 (22 April 1972 --- Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, stands near the Lunar Roving Vehicle at Station no. 4, near Stone Mountain, during the second Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Descartes landing site. Light rays from South Ray crater can be seen at upper left. The gnomon, which is used as a photographic reference to establish local vertical Sun angle, scale, and lunar color, is deployed in the center foreground. Note angularity of rocks in the area.
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Description AS16-107-17436 (21 April 1972) --- An excellent view of the Lunar Module (LM) ?Orion? and Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), as photographed by astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, can be seen directly behind the LRV. The lunar surface feature in the left background is Stone Mountain. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the LM to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) ?Casper? in lunar orbit.
AS16-118-18964 (16 - 27...
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Description AS16-118-18964 (16 - 27 April 1972) --- This lunar farside oblique view from the Apollo 16 spacecraft in lunar-orbit shows the Leonov Crater, just to the left and above the principal point of the photograph. Just beyond the horizon lies the Moscow Sea.
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Description AS16-121-19449 (April 1972) --- This 70mm handheld camera's view of the moon, photographed during the Apollo 16 mission's trans-Earth coast, features Mare Fecunditatis (Sea of Fertility) in the foreground with the twin craters Messier at the lower right. Nearer the horizon is Mare Nectaris (Sea of Nectar) with craters Goclenius and Gutenberg in between. Goclenius is located at approximately 10 degrees south latitude and 45 degrees east longitude.
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Description AS16-115-18559 (23 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, drives the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to its final parking place near the end of the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this photograph looking southward. The flank of Stone Mountain can be seen on the horizon at left. The shadow of the Lunar Module (LM) occupies much of the picture.
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Description AS16-122-19533 (23 April 1972) --- The ascent stage of the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (LM) approaches the Command and Service Modules (CSM) during rendezvous, with a contrasting background of darkness and the Moon?s Sea of Fertility (Mare Fecundatatis). Taken from the CSM, the photo shows the aft side of the LM during a yaw maneuver. Note the buckled thermal panels. Messier and Messier A (right center) are among the most readily identifiable features on the surface below.
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Description AS16-120-19187 (19 April 1972) --- Apollo 16 astronauts captured this Earth rise scene with a handheld Hasselblad camera during the second revolution of the moon. Identifiable craters seen on the moon include Saha, Wyld, and Saenger. Much of the terrain seen here is never visible from the Earth, as the Command Module (CM) was just passing onto what is known as the dark side or far side of the moon. Crew members aboard the CM at the time the photo was made were astronauts John W. Young, Thomas K. Mattingly II and Charles M. Duke, Jr.
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Description AS16-114-18423 (21 April 1972) --- Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed collecting lunar samples at Station No. 1, during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1), at the Descartes landing site. This picture, looking eastward, was taken by astronaut John W. Young, commander. Duke is standing at the rim of Plum crater. The parked Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) can be seen in the left background. While astronaut's Young and Duke descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands region of the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.
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Description AS16-113-18339 (21 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, leaps from the lunar surface as he salutes the United States flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1). Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture. The Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" is on the left. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked beside the LM. The object behind Young (in the shade of the LM) is the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph. Stone Mountain dominates the background in this lunar scene.
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Description AS16-116-18653 (23 April 1972) --- Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Apollo 16 lunar module pilot, stands at a big rock adjacent (south) to the huge "House Rock" (barely out of view at right edge). Note shadow at extreme right center where the two Moon-exploring crew members of the mission sampled what they referred to as the "east-by-west split of House Rock" or the open space between this rock and "House Rock". At their post-mission press conference, the crew men expressed the opinion that this rock was once a part of "House Rock" which had broken away. The two sampled the big boulder seen here also. Duke has a sample bag in his hand, and a lunar surface rake leans against the large boulder. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, exposed this view with a color magazine in his 70mm Hasselblad camera.
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Description AS16-114-18388 (21 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, stands at the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) deployment site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Descartes landing site. The components of the ALSEP are in the background. The lunar surface drill is just behind and to the right of astronaut Young. The drill's rack and bore stems are to the left. The three-sensor Lunar Surface Magnetometer is beyond the rack. The dark object in the right background is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). Between the RTG and the drill is the Heat Flow Experiment. A part of the Central Station is at the right center edge of the picture. This photograph was taken by astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot.
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Description AS16-114-18422 (21 April 1972) --- A view of Plum Crater, which was visited by the two Moon-exploring crew members of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, on their first extravehicular activity (EVA-1) traverse, April 21, 1972. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked on the far side of the crater, which measures approximately 40 meters in diameter.
descended in the Apollo...
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Description descended in the Apollo 16 lm ?Orion? to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (csm) ?Casper? in lunar orbit.
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Description AS16-117-18826 (23 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young collects samples at the North Ray Crater geological site during the mission?s third and final Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3). He has a rake in his hand, and the gnomon is near his foot. Note how soiled Young's Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is.
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Description AS16-117-18825 (23 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, with a sample bag in his left hand, moves toward the bottom part of the gnomon (center) while collecting samples at the North Ray Crater geological site. Note how soiled Young's Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is during this the third and final Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3). The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked at upper left.
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Description S72-33898 (22 March 1972) --- Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Apollo 16 lunar module pilot, trains on a simulated lunar surface area at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), with a core tube and a hammer. Astronauts Duke and John W. Young, commander, will take part in three extravehicular activities (EVA?s) on the Moon while astronaut Thomas K. (Ken) Mattingly II, command module pilot, remains with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
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Description S72-35351(16 April 1972) --- An overall view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC) on the first day of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission. This picture was taken during television coverage transmitted from the Apollo 16 spacecraft on its way to the Moon. The TV monitor in the background shows how the Apollo 16 astronauts viewed the Earth from 7,500 nautical miles away.
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Description Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot; and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. This is the official Apollo 16 emblem, a property of the government of the United States. It has been authorized only for use by the astronauts. Its reproduction in any form other than in news, information and education media is not authorized without approval. Unauthorized use is subject to the provisions of Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 701.
S71-51295 (1971) --- As...
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S71-51289 (1971) --- As...
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S71-51261 (1971) --- As...
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Description S72-36293 (27 April 1972) --- The Apollo 16 Command Module (CM), with astronauts John W. Young, Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Charles M. Duke Jr. aboard, splashed down in the central Pacific Ocean to successfully conclude their lunar landing mission. The splashdown occurred at 290:37:06 ground elapsed time, 1:45:06 p.m. (CST) Thursday, April 27, 1972, at coordinates of 00:43.2 degrees south latitude and 156:11.4 degrees west longitude. A point approximately 215 miles southeast of Christmas Island. Later the three crew men were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship U.S.S. Ticonderoga.
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Description S72-37002 (23 April 1972) --- The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) gets a speed workout by astronaut John W. Young in the "Grand Prix" run during the third Apollo 16 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera held by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr. While astronaut's Young, commander, and Duke, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands region of the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.
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Description S72-36970 (23 April 1972) --- The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) gets a speed workout by astronaut John W. Young in the "Grand Prix" run during the third Apollo 16 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera held by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr. While astronaut's Young, commander, and Duke, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands region of the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.
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Description S72-37001 (25 April 1972) --- Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, performs an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 trans-Earth coast. Mattingly is assisted by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM Bay or Service Module (SM), and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic Cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet?s lunar EVA visor assembly helped protect Mattingly?s eyes from the bright Sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.
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Description S75-23543 (1972) --- This Apollo 16 lunar sample (Moon rock) was collected by astronaut John W. Young, commander of the mission, about 15 meters southwest of the landing site. The rock is Apollo 16 sample no. 60016,123. It weighed 128 grams when returned to Earth. The sample is a polymict breccia. This rock, like all lunar highland breccias, is very old, about 3,900,000,000 years older than 99.99% of all Earth surface rocks. Scientific research is being conducted on the balance of this sample at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and at other research centers in the United States and certain foreign nations under a continuing program of investigation involving lunar samples collected during the Apollo Program
S89-36956 --- A replica...
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Description AS17-137-21011 (12 December 1972) --- An excellent view of the desolate lunar scape at Station 4 showing scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, working at the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-2) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This is the area where Schmitt first spotted the orange soil, the orange soil is clearly visible on either side of the LRV in this picture. Shorty Crater is to the right, and the peak in the center background is Family Mountain. A portion of South Massif is on the horizon at the left edge. This photograph was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
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Description AS17-134-20426 (11 December 1972) --- Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt collects lunar rake samples at Station 1 during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This picture was taken by Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander. Schmitt is the lunar module pilot. The Lunar Rake, an Apollo Lunar Geology Hand Tool, is used to collect discrete samples of rocks and rock chips ranging in size from one-half inch (1.3 cm) to one inch (2.5 cm).
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