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REFINE 

Search Results: All Fields similar to 'Aircraft and Flight and Vehicles'

1-50 of 626
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Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/24/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Autonomous Aerial Refueling (AAR)
Autonomous Aerial Refue...
4/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
F-15B #837 Final Flight
F-15B #837 Final Flight
2/17/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Approach and Landing Tests, Space Shuttle Support
Approach and Landing Te...
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
NASA pilot Ed Lewis with the T-34C aircraft on the Dryden Flight Research Center Ramp. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002.
Pilot Ed Lewis with T-3...
March 4, 1998
 
Description NASA pilot Ed Lewis with the T-34C aircraft on the Dryden Flight Research Center Ramp. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002.
X-15
X-15
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
HiMAT in flight
HiMAT in flight
The HiMAT (Highly Maneu...
01.01.1980
Image
 
HiMAT in flight
HiMAT in flight
The HiMAT (Highly Maneu...
01.01.1980
Image
 
HiMAT in flight
HiMAT in flight
The HiMAT (Highly Maneu...
01.01.1980
Image
 
A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is shown flying above the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in March 1997. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
T-34C in flight
March 21, 1997
 
Description A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is shown flying above the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in March 1997. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is shown flying above the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in March 1997. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
T-34C in flight
March 21, 1997
 
Description A NASA T-34C aircraft, used for safety chase, is shown flying above the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in March 1997. The aircraft was previously used at the Lewis Research Center in propulsion experiments involving turboprop engines, and was used as a chase aircraft at Dryden for smaller and slower research projects. Chase aircraft accompany research flights for photography and video purposes, and also as support for safety and research. At Dryden, the T-34 is used mainly for smaller remotely piloted vehicles which fly slower than NASA's F-18's, used for larger scale projects. This aircraft was returned to the U.S. Navy in May of 2002. The T-34C, built by Beech, carries a crew of 2 and is nicknamed the Mentor.
Perseus B Parked on Ramp
Perseus B Parked on Ram...
Unique Aircraft
09/01/1999
NASA Tom Tscida
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
HiMAT on lakebed after landing
HiMAT on lakebed after ...
The HiMAT (Highly Maneu...
01.01.1979
Image
 
Lunar Landing Research Vehicle
Lunar Landing Research ...
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
X-43A
X-43A
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
A newly constructed pyl...
June 15, 2004
 
X-15 Mated to B-52 Captive Flight
X-15 Mated to B-52 Capt...
Top 20 Dryden Aircraft,...
01/01/1959
NASA
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
NASA Dryden's Automated...
September 18, 2003
 
X-34 at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center
X-34 at NASA Dryden Fli...
X-Series Aircraft
04/16/1999
NASA Tony Landis
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
August 27, 2003
 
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
August 27, 2003
 
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
March 3, 2003
 
X-15 Mounted to B-52 Mothership Pylon in Flight
X-15 Mounted to B-52 Mo...
Top 20 Dryden Aircraft,...
01/01/1965
NASA
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Lifting Body Aircraft
Lifting Body Aircraft
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
Phantom Works (formerly...
10.30.1997
Image
 
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
1997 was a 28-percent s...
10.30.1997
Image
 
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
Dryden Flight Research ...
07.02.1996
Image
 
X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden
X-36 Tailless Fighter A...
28-percent scale repres...
07.02.1996
Image
 
Thrust Vectoring, High Alpha Research
Thrust Vectoring, High ...
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden
A NASA F/A-18, particip...
A NASA F/A-18 flies ove...
12.11.2002
Image
 
This view from a NASA D...
This view from a NASA D...
December 6, 2002
 
The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
Walter C. Williams Rese...
December 15, 1995
 
Description The NASA-Dryden Integrated Test Facility (ITF), also known as the Walter C. Williams Research Aircraft Integration Facility (RAIF), provides an environment for conducting efficient and thorough testing of advanced, highly integrated research aircraft. Flight test confidence is greatly enhanced by the ability to qualify interactive aircraft systems in a controlled environment. In the ITF, each element of a flight vehicle can be regulated and monitored in real time as it interacts with the rest of the aircraft systems. Testing in the ITF is accomplished through automated techniques in which the research aircraft is interfaced to a high-fidelity real-time simulation. Electric and hydraulic power are also supplied, allowing all systems except the engines to function as if in flight. The testing process is controlled by an engineering workstation that sets up initial conditions for a test, initiates the test run, monitors its progress, and archives the data generated. The workstation is also capable of analyzing results of individual tests, comparing results of multiple tests, and producing reports. The computers used in the automated aircraft testing process are also capable of operating in a stand-alone mode with a simulation cockpit, complete with its own instruments and controls. Control law development and modification, aerodynamic, propulsion, guidance model qualification, and flight planning -- functions traditionally associated with real-time simulation -- can all be performed in this manner. The Remotely Augmented Vehicles (RAV) function, now located in the ITF, is a mainstay in the research techniques employed at Dryden. This function is used for tests that are too dangerous for direct human involvement or for which computational capacity does not exist onboard a research aircraft. RAV provides the researcher with a ground-based computer that is radio linked to the test aircraft during actual flight. The Ground Vibration Testing (GVT) system, formerly housed in the Thermostructural Laboratory, now also resides in the ITF. In preparing a research aircraft for flight testing, it is vital to measure its structural frequencies and mode shapes and compare results to the models used in design analysis. The final function performed in the ITF is routine aircraft maintenance. This includes preflight and post-flight instrumentation checks and the servicing of hydraulics, avionics, and engines necessary on any research aircraft. Aircraft are not merely moved to the ITF for automated testing purposes but are housed there throughout their flight test programs.
PA-30 Twin Comanche - NASA 808 in hangar
PA-30 Twin Comanche - N...
Technicians check instr...
01.01.1980
Image
 
A Beech T-34C aircraft ...
June 20, 2005
 
A Beech T-34C aircraft ...
June 20, 2005
 
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
March 1996
 
Description NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
This NASA Dryden F/A-18...
NASA Dryden's Automated...
December 19, 2002
 
X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B...
This photo shows one of...
July 9, 1999
 
The X-34 Demonstrator Loading Onto Launch Vehicle
The X-34 Demonstrator L...
2004-04-15
 
A convoy of specialized support vehicles follow the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it is towed up a taxi
A convoy of specialized...
A convoy of specialized...
05.01.2001
Image
 
F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
NASA Dryden Flight Rese...
03.01.1996
Image
 
A Beech T-34C mission s...
June 20, 2005
 
This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
13 Nov 1995
 
Description This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).
1-50 of 626
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