REFINE

 
 

WHO

  1. Administrator Sean O'Kee … (27)
  2. Al Gore (3)
  3. Alan G. Poindexter (33)
  4. Albert Sacco (16)
  5. Alexander Kaleri (37)
  6. Andrew Thomas (2)
  7. B. Alvin Drew (9)
  8. Bjarni Tryggvason (6)
  9. Brent W. Jett (102)
  10. Brian Duffy (22)
  11. Buzz Aldrin (1)
  12. C. Gordon Fullerton (1)
  13. Carl Walz (5)
  14. Carlos I. Noriega (72)
  15. Catherine Coleman (1)
  16. Charles Hobaugh (1)
  17. Chiaki Mukai (37)
  18. Chris Hadfield (1)
  19. Christer Fuglesang (125)
  20. Claude Nicollier (30)
  21. Clayton Anderson (51)
  22. Daniel Burbank (1)
  23. Daniel Tani (88)
  24. David M. Brown (34)
  25. David M. Walker (17)
  26. David R. Scott (1)
  27. David Wolf (4)
  28. Deke Slayton (1)
  29. Dominic Gorie (1)
  30. Donald Slayton (1)
  31. Donald Thomas (2)
  32. Dr. Christopher C. Kraft (2)
  33. Dr. Michael Griffin (4)
  34. Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (6)
  35. Eileen Collins (5)
  36. Ellen Ochoa (79)
  37. Frank Culbertson (5)
  38. Frank De Winne (1)
  39. Franklin Chang-Diaz (6)
  40. Frederick D. Gregory (10)
  41. Fyodor Yurchikhin (31)
  42. Garrett Reisman (10)
  43. General Jefferson D. How … (17)
  44. Gennady Padalka (28)
  45. George H.W. Bush (6)
  46. George W.S. Abbey (16)
  47. Gerhard Thiele (3)
  48. Gordon Cooper (19)
  49. Gregory H. Johnson (18)
  50. Hans Schlegel (50)
  51. Harrison Schmitt (1)
  52. Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Pi … (2)
  53. Ilan Ramon (48)
  54. James Adamson (2)
  55. James C. Elms (1)
  56. James F. Reilly (65)
  57. James H. Newman (126)
  58. James Halsell (1)
  59. James Kelly (2)
  60. James Voss (2)
  61. James Wetherbee (2)
  62. Janet Kavandi (1)
  63. Janice Voss (22)
  64. Jeffrey Ashby (5)
  65. Jerry L. Ross (124)
  66. John H. Glenn (2)
  67. John Herrington (10)
  68. John Phillips (7)
  69. Joseph Kerwin (1)
  70. Joseph M. Acaba (13)
  71. Joseph Tanner (4)
  72. Julie Payette (32)
  73. Kalpana Chawla (58)
  74. Kenneth Cockrell (5)
  75. Koichi Wakata (46)
  76. Laurel B. Clark (45)
  77. Leland D. Melvin (34)
  78. Leonid Kadenyuk (3)
  79. Leroy Chiao (263)
  80. Lisa Nowak (1)
  81. Loren Shriver (1)
  82. Lyndon B. Johnson (2)
  83. Mamoru Mohri (25)
  84. Marc Garneau (50)
  85. Marcos Pontes (46)
  86. Mario Runco (2)
  87. Mark C. Lee (24)
  88. Mark E. Kelly (147)
  89. Mark Polansky (7)
  90. Marsha Ivins (3)
  91. Michael Coats (5)
  92. Michael Collins (29)
  93. Michael Foale (252)
  94. Michael J. Bloomfield (91)
  95. Michael L. Coats (12)
  96. Michael Lopez-Alegria (19)
  97. Michael P. Anderson (36)
  98. Michel Tognini (17)
  99. Mikhail Tyurin (318)
  100. Nancy Currie (4)
  101. Neil A. Armstrong (20)
  102. Nikolai Budarin (2)
  103. Oleg Kononenko (2)
  104. Oleg Kotov (22)
  105. Pamela Melroy (9)
  106. Patrick Forrester (91)
  107. Paul Lockhart (6)
  108. Paul W. Richards (35)
  109. Pavel Vinogradov (2)
  110. Pedro Duque (155)
  111. Peggy Whitson (61)
  112. Pete Conrad (1)
  113. Philippe Perrin (65)
  114. Piers Sellers (5)
  115. Rex Walheim (2)
  116. Richard B. Cheney (7)
  117. Richard Covey (3)
  118. Rick D. Husband (61)
  119. Robert Curbeam (2)
  120. Robert L. Behnken (39)
  121. Robert Thirsk (1)
  122. Roberto Vittori (98)
  123. Roy S. Estess (29)
  124. Salizhan Sharipov (35)
  125. Sandra Magnus (8)
  126. Scott Altman (1)
  127. Scott Carpenter (4)
  128. Scott Kelly (43)
  129. Scott Parazynski (129)
  130. Sergei Krikalev (63)
  131. Sergei Zalyotin (20)
  132. Shannon Lucid (1)
  133. Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor (73)
  134. Soichi Noguchi (190)
  135. Sonny Carter (101)
  136. Spiro T. Agnew (1)
  137. Stanley G. Love (53)
  138. Stephanie Wilson (80)
  139. Stephen Robinson (1)
  140. Steven Lindsey (8)
  141. Steven MacLean (1)
  142. Sunita "Suni" Williams (10)
  143. Susan Helms (11)
  144. Susan Still (2)
  145. Takao Doi (64)
  146. Talgat Musabayev (4)
  147. Tamara E. Jernigan (21)
  148. Thomas D. Jones (52)
  149. Thomas Reiter (144)
  150. Umberto Guidoni (22)
  151. Valentina Tereshkova (1)
  152. Valery Korzun (6)
  153. Valery Ryumin (1)
  154. Valery Tokarev (9)
  155. Vladimir N. Dezhurov (128)
  156. Wendy Lawrence (13)
  157. William C. McCool (28)
  158. William McArthur (4)
  159. William Readdy (1)
  160. William Shepherd (25)
  161. William W. Parsons (1)
  162. Yuri Gagarin (16)
  163. Yuri Gidzenko (57)
  164. Yuri Lonchakov (1)
  165. Yuri Malenchenko (22)
  166. Yuri Onufrienko (13)
  167. Yuri Shargin (98)
  168. Yury Usachev (3)
Less
REFINE 

Search Results: MediaCollectionId equal to 'NasaNAS~16~16'

1-50 of 15,490
1 2 3  
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5485 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, remove the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of the duo's crewmates on the aft flight deck.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5481 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). This image was recorded with a digital still camera by one of the duo's crewmates on the aft flight deck.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5688 (7 March 2002) --- Astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, assists astronaut Michael J. Massimino, mission specialist, with suit-donning tasks prior to the STS-109 mission's fourth space walk (EVA-4). Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman went on to install the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-001 (August 2001) --- STS-109 is the fourth mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The mission patch depicts the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Shuttle Columbia over the North American continent. During the eleven-day mission, the crew of Columbia will rendezvous with the telescope and grapple and berth it to the Space Shuttle using the remote manipulator system. Then, a series of space walks will be performed to significantly upgrade HST?s scientific capabilities and power system. Inside of HST?s aperture is a portrayal of the spectacular Hubble Deep Field Image, representing the billions of stars and galaxies in the Universe. This Deep Field Image symbolizes all the major discoveries made possible by the Hubble Space Telescope over the last ten years, and all those to come following the installation of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) by the crew of STS-109. The ACS is the major scientific upgrade for this servicing mission and will dramatically increase HST?s ability to see deeper into our universe. To further extend HST?s discovery potential, a new cooling system will be added that will restore HST?s infrared capability. The telescope is also shown with the smaller, sturdier, and more efficient solar arrays that will be installed during the space walks on STS-109. When combined with a new Power Control Unit, these solar arrays will provide more power for use by the telescope and allow multiple scientific instruments to operate concurrently. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-093 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, temporarily hosted in the Space Shuttle Columbia?s cargo bay, is backdropped by a blue and white Earth.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-00B (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-064 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-035 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, illuminated by the sunrise, provides stark contrast to the blackness of space in this scene. Arching between the telescope and one of the solar panels is the thin line of Earth?s atmosphere.
International Space Sta...
2005-08-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-24596 (14 April 2005) --- Dallas, Texas is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 10 crewmember on the International Space Station. The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is the largest in Texas with an approximate population of 6 million people in 2005. Founded by John Neely Bryan in 1841, the city became the center for the United States oil economy with the discovery of oilfields to the east of the city in 1930. The Dallas-Forth Worth region today is a major corporate, banking, and technological center. This image captures the northwestern portion of the metropolitan area. Standing water bodies such as Lake Lewisville and Grapevine Lake are highlighted by sunglint, where the surface of the water acts as a mirror reflecting sunlight back towards the astronauts on the Station. Using the sunglint to define edges of water helps when mapping water bodies and stream courses on a landscape ? note the region of small ponds to the north of Grapevine Lake highlighted by sunglint.
International Space Sta...
2005-06-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-07471 (28 May 2005) --- Sept-?les, Gulf of St Lawrence, Quebec, Canada is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Seven Island Bay (left side of the image) is one of the largest (8?10 kilometers across) and best protected bays on Quebec?s north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Because this is both a deep water port and ice-free year round, Sept-?les is one of Quebec?s busiest ports. Locally produced materials (iron ore, alumina) comprise the bulk of port traffic, but Sept-?les also acts as a trans-shipment point for goods moving to Europe, the Far East and South America. The small city of Sept-?les (~30,000 people) appears in the center of the view; Pointe Noir is opposite the city in the lower left corner. The industrial park lies top left and the angled runways of the airport appear east of the city. Five (of the bay?s seven) islands appear at the bottom of the view. Wind and swells produce patterns on the water. Ships can be seen in the bay and a ship wake appears between the two left islands at the bottom of the view.
International Space Sta...
2006-11-13 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-63766 (2 Aug. 2006) --- Berkeley Pit and Butte, Montana are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city of Butte, Montana has long been a center of mining activity. Underground mining of copper began in Butte in the 1870s, and by 1901 underground workings had extended to the groundwater table. Thus began the creation of an intricate complex of underground drains and pumps to lower the groundwater level and continue the extraction of copper. Water extracted from the mines was so rich in dissolved copper sulfate that it was also "mined" (by chemical precipitation) for the copper it contained. In 1955, the Anaconda Copper Mining Company began open-pit mining for copper in what is now know as the Berkeley Pit (dark oblong area in center). The mine took advantage of the existing subterranean drainage and pump network to lower groundwater until 1982, when the new owner ARCO suspended operations at the mine. The groundwater level swiftly rose, and today water in the Pit is more than 900 feet deep. Many features of the mine workings are visible in this image such as the many terraced levels and access roadways of the open mine pits (gray and tan sculptured surfaces). A large gray tailings pile of waste rock and an adjacent tailings pond are visible to the north of the Berkeley Pit. Color changes in the tailings pond are due primarily to changing water depth. The Berkeley Pit is listed as a federal Superfund site due to its highly acidic water, which contains high concentrations of metals such as copper and zinc. The Berkeley Pit receives groundwater flowing through the surrounding bedrock and acts as a "terminal pit" or sink for these heavy metal-laden waters. Ongoing efforts include regulation of water flow into the pit to reduce filling of the Pit and potential release of contaminated water into local aquifers or surface streams.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-76262 (4 Sept. 2006) --- Lake Morari, Tibet is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. Melt-water from glaciers to the east and west drains into Lake Morari, a large lake on the Tibetan Plateau which lies at an altitude of 4,521 meters (14,830 feet). The main inflow to the lake is via a west-side stream. Mud from this river gives the light blue hues to the lake water. The well-formed alluvial fan (center), built by sediment from the main inflow river, is the reason the lake has formed at this point in the valley. The fan has dammed up the depression now occupied by Lake Morari (approximately 7 kilometers wide in this view) and forms the curved southern shore of the lake. The apex of the fan lies fully 40 meters above the level of the lake. The change of color and texture on the fan seems to result from a new influx of gray sediment on top of an older fan which had several channels cut into it. Interestingly, the alluvial fan also acts as the only outlet of the lake, although no obvious outlet channel can be seen in this detailed view. South of the fan an outlet river appears as a green surface, possibly due to aquatic vegetation or algae. Altitude measurements show that the outlet river lies many meters below the lake surface.
International Space Sta...
2006-09-25 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-81687 (17 Sept. 2006) --- A forest fire in southern California is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The day fire started in Los Padres National Forest north of Los Angeles on Sept. 4, 2006. Easterly winds on Sept. 17 blew the smoke west out to sea, and this wind shift was observed by station crewmembers. The forested mountains north of Los Angeles appear dark green, the smoke a dusky gray. Dense farmland at the south end of California's central valley is framed by the forested Sierra Nevada mountain range. White patches near the center of the view are dry lakes of the Mojave Desert, one of which acts as a landing site for the space shuttle. The dark irregular shape at image right is part of the space station. Death Valley and Las Vegas are visible at image right. The extent of the day fire smoke plume can be gauged from the gray urban region of greater Los Angeles (center) which stretches along 50 miles of coastline. The plume obscures the northern Channel Islands, but the southern Channel Islands are silhouetted against the ocean.
STS-116 Shuttle Mission...
2007-01-08 0:0:0
 
Description S116-E-07663 (20 Dec. 2006) --- One of the STS-116 crewmembers onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery captured this picture of Aurora Borealis over Norway, Poland and Sweden, as the crew made preparations for a Dec. 22 landing. European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang onboard the shuttle noted the rarity of pictures over this area from shuttle missions, and especially pictures that included the Northern Lights. Fuglesang is from Sweden. The city lights of Copenhagen (bright cluster of lights in the middle left portion of the image), Stockholm (under the aurora on the far right side of the image), and Gdansk (in the center forefront) are seen. The formation of the aurora starts with the sun releasing solar particles. The Earth's magnetic field captures and channels the solar particles toward the Earth's two magnetic poles (north and south). As the solar particles move towards the poles they collide with the Earth's atmosphere, which acts as an effective shield against these deadly particles. The collision between the solar particles and the atmospheric gas molecule emits a light particle (photon). When there are many collisions the aurora is formed.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description S114-E-6378 (3 August 2005) --- While perched on a Space Station truss, astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acts as observer and communication relay station between fellow spacewalker Stephen K. Robinson (out of frame) and astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas aboard Space Shuttle Discovery during a part of the mission?s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). A portion of the thermal protection tiles on Discovery?s underside is visible at lower left. The image was photographed by Robinson using a digital camera.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description S114-E-6376 (3 August 2005) --- A close-up view of a portion of the thermal protection tiles on Space Shuttle Discovery?s underside is featured in this image photographed by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson (out of frame), STS-114 mission specialist, during the mission?s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). While perched on a Space Station truss, astronaut Soichi Noguchi (background), mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acts as observer and communication relay station between fellow spacewalker Robinson and astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas aboard Discovery.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description S114-E-6370 (3 August 2005) --- While perched on a Space Station truss, astronaut Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 mission specialist representing Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acts as observer and communication relay station between fellow spacewalker Stephen K. Robinson (out of frame) and astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas aboard Space Shuttle Discovery during the mission?s third session of extravehicular activities (EVA). A portion of the thermal protection tiles on Discovery?s underside is visible at lower left. The image was photographed by Robinson using a digital camera.
STS-117 Shuttle Mission...
2007-08-15 0:0:0
 
Description S117-E-06998 (10 June 2007) --- Polar Mesospheric Clouds are featured in this image photographed by a STS-117 crewmember onboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sometimes in the summertime in the far northern (or southern) latitudes, high in the Earth's atmosphere at the edge of space, thin silvery clouds form and are observed just after sunset. These high clouds, occurring at altitudes of about 80 kilometers (50 miles), are called Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) or noctilucent clouds, and are the subject of new studies to determine whether their occurrence is related to global climate change. Observations over the past few years suggest that PMC are now observed more frequently and at lower latitudes than historical observations. Several studies related to the International Polar Year (IPY), and the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) spacecraft are underway to collect relevant data on the chemistry and physics of the mesosphere that might explain the occurrence of PMC. Astronauts in orbiting spacecraft frequently observe PMC over Canada, northern Europe and Asia during June, July and August. While PMC also occur over the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere in December, January and February, astronaut observations of southern PMC are less frequent. Earlier in June 2007, the shuttle crew visiting the International Space Station observed spectacular PMC over north-central Asia. This image was taken looking north while the shuttle and station were docking and flying over the border between western China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan. The red-to-dark region at the bottom of the image is the dense part of the Earth's atmosphere. Because this image was taken with a long lens (180mm), the entire profile of the Earth's limb is not captured. To support IPY research over the next 2 years, station crewmembers will be looking for and documenting PMC in both hemispheres.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S66-45633(09/26/66) - Astronauts Charles Conrad (left), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon (right), pilot, demonstrate tether procedure between their Gemini 11 spacecraft and the Agena Target Docking Vehicle at the post flight press conference. They use models of their spacecraft and its Agena to illustrate maneuvers.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S66-59963 (9 November 1966) --- Monument at Pad 14 honoring Project Mercury. The Arabic number 7 represents the seven original astronauts. The other figure is the astronomical symbol of the Planet Mercury. In background is the Gemini 12 Agena Target Docking Vehicle atop its Atlas launch vehicle at Cape Kennedy, Florida.
International Space Sta...
2005-02-28 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-15488 (7 July 2004) --- Solimoes-Negro River confluence at Manaus, Amazonia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). The largest river on the planet, the Amazon, forms from the confluence of the Solimoes (the upper Amazon River) and the Negro at the Brazilian city of Manaus in central Amazonas. At the river conjunction, the muddy, tan colored waters of the Solimoes meet the ?black? water of the Negro River. The unique mixing zone where the waters meet extends downstream through the rainforest for hundreds of kilometers, and is a famous attraction for tourists all over the world. It is the vast quantity of sediment eroded from the Andes Mountains that gives the Solimoes its tan color. By comparison, water in the Negro derives from the low jungles where reduced physical erosion of rock precludes mud entering the river. In place of sediment, organic matter from the forest floor stains the river the color of black tea.
STS-123 Shuttle Mission...
2007-06-26 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2007-E-29376 (14 June 2007) --- Crew trainer Bob Behrendsen (left) briefs astronauts Dominic L. Gorie (center) and Gregory H. Johnson, STS-123 commander and pilot, respectively, during a water survival training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near Johnson Space Center.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS106-701-025 (8-20 September 2000) --- One of the STS-106 crew members on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis used a handheld 70mm camera to photograph this image of Cairo, Egypt, the largest city in Africa. Its population is nearly 16 million, a figure which translates to approximately 130,000 people per square mile. Metropolitan Cairo shows as a gray area in the green of the Nile River valley at the apex of the Delta. The shadows of the three major pyramids at Giza on the Western edge of the city are visible. They are right below the bright new road construction. This side of the metropolitan area is experiencing rapid growth. According to geologists who have been studying shuttle-to-Earth imagery for many years, this photograph documents some of the many changes in land use in the Western Desert.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-44022 (7-24-69) --- On hand in Houston's mission control center to witness activity associated with the landing and recovery operations for the Apollo 11 mission were, from the left, Bob Kline, chief of the Mission Operations Procurement Branch at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC); astronaut John H. Glenn Jr.; and Eberhard Rees, deputy director of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). They were among a large number of personnel on hand in the MCC's mission operations control room (MOCR). Glenn holds one of the dozens of flags that were handed out for the return's celebration.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5390 (20 July 1969)--- This interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM) shows astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, during the lunar landing mission. This picture was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-37-5445 (20 July 1969) --- The Apollo 11 Command and Service Modules (CSM) are photographed from the Lunar Module (LM) in lunar orbit during the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The lunar surface below is in the north central Sea of Fertility. The coordinates of the center of the picture are 51 degrees east longitude and 1 degree north latitude. About half of the crater Taruntius G is visible in the lower left corner of the picture. Part of Taruntius H can be seen at lower right.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5875 (20 JULY 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the "Eagle", to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5874 (20 JULY 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM the "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-37-5528 (20 July 1969) --- This photograph of astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, was taken inside the Lunar Module (LM) while the LM rested on the lunar surface. Astronauts Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, had already completed their historic extravehicular activity (EVA) when this picture was made. Astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin explored the Moon's surface.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5868 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descends the steps of the Lunar Module (LM) ladder as he prepares to walk on the Moon. He had just egressed the LM. This photograph was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). While Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM "Eagle" to explore the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5878 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Moon. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-44-6626 (21 July 1969) --- The Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM) ascent stage, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. aboard, is photographed from the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. Astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the CSM in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin explored the Moon. The LM is approaching from below. The coordinates of the center of the lunar terrain seen below is located at 102 degrees east longitude and 1 degree north latitude.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-44-6548 (July 1969) --- This view from the Apollo 11 spacecraft shows the Earth rising above the Moon's horizon. The lunar terrain pictured is in the area of Smyth's Sea on the nearside. Coordinates of the center of the terrain are 86 degrees east longitude and 3 degrees north latitude. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Adrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5902 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near a leg of the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. The astronauts' footprints are clearly visible in the foreground. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-44-6550 (July 1969) --- This view from the Apollo 11 spacecraft shows the Earth rising above the Moon's horizon. The lunar terrain pictured is in the area of Smyth's Sea on the nearside. Coordinates of the center of the terrain are 86 degrees east longitude and 3 degrees north latitude. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Adrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Apollo 11 was NASA's first lunar landing mission in the Apollo program.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5880 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's foot and foot print in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin A. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM)" Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-40-5903 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" during the Apollo 11 exravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-44-6609 (July 1969) --- An oblique of the Crater Daedalus on the lunar farside as seen from the Apollo 11 spacecraft in lunar orbit. The view looks southwest. Daedalus (formerly referred to as I.A.U. Crater No. 308) is located at 179 degrees east longitude and 5.5 degrees south latitude. Daedalus has a diameter of about 50 statute miles. This is a typical scene showing the rugged terrain on the farside of the Moon. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description AS11-44-6549 (July 1969) --- This view from the Apollo 11 spacecraft shows the Earth rising above the Moon's horizon. The lunar terrain pictured is in the area of Smyth's Sea on the nearside. Coordinates of the center of the terrain are 86 degrees east longitude and 3 degrees north latitude. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Adrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.
S69-39595 (July 1969) -...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-21783 (24 JULY 1969) --- The Apollo 11 Command Module (CM) is photographed as it is hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery vessel for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The splashdown took place at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii, only 12 nautical miles from the U.S.S. Hornet.
S69-31743 (JULY 1969) -...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
S69-31741 (JULY 1969) -...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the U.S.S. Hornet. The three crew men will remain in the MQF until they arrive at the Manned Spacecraft Center's (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-42583 (20 JULY 1969) --- Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, descends the ladder of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM) prior to making the first step by man on another celestial body. This view is a black and white reproduction taken from a telecast by the Apollo 11 lunar surface camera during Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The black bar running through the center of the picture is an anamoly in the television ground data system at the Goldstone Tracking Station.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-40308 (20 JULY 1969) --- The deployment of the flag of the United States on the surface of the Moon is captured on film during the first Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, stands on the left at the flag's staff. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, is also pictured. The picture was taken from film exposed by the 16mm Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) which was mounted in the Lunar Module (LM). While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States first lunar landing mission. Astronaut's Armstrong and Aldrin will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, while astronaut Collins remains with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States' first lunar landing mission. While Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-39958 (16 JULY 1969) --- A 70mm Airborne Lightweight Optical Tracking System (ALOTS) camera, mounted in a pod on a cargo door of a U.S. Air Force EC-135N aircraft, photographed this event in the early moments of the Apollo 11 launch. The mated Apollo spacecraft and Saturn V second (S-II) and third (S-IVB) stages pull away from the expended first (S-1C) stage. Separation occurred at an altitude of about 38 miles, some 55 miles downrange from Cape Kennedy. The aircraft's pod is 20 feet long and 5 feet in diameter. The crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr.
1-50 of 15,490
1 2 3