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Long Valley, California Interferometry/Topography
Long Valley, California...
11/18/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Long Valley, California L band
Long Valley, California...
10/10/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Enceladus: The Plot Thickens
Enceladus: The Plot Thi...
Enceladus: The Plot Thi...
August 30, 2005
 
Media Type Image
2-D Unstructured Mesh Particle-MHD Solar Wind Flow Over the Earth: Magnetic Potential
2-D Unstructured Mesh P...
Contour lines of the z-...
 
MOLA: Seasonal Snow Variations on Mars, clouds at both poles, with dates, with contours
MOLA: Seasonal Snow Var...
MGS/MOLA
Maritan clouds with a c...
 
MOLA: Seasonal Snow Variations on Mars, clouds at both poles, with dates, with contours
MOLA: Seasonal Snow Var...
MGS/MOLA
Maritan clouds with a c...
 
September Mean Sea Ice Concentration Anomaly fade from 2002 to 2003 with Mean Ice Extent Contour
September Mean Sea Ice ...
DMSP/SSMI
The Arctic sea ice conc...
 
September Mean Sea Ice Concentration Anomaly fade from 2002 to 2003 with Mean Ice Extent Contour
September Mean Sea Ice ...
DMSP/SSMI
The Arctic sea ice conc...
 
September Mean Sea Ice Concentration Anomaly fade from 2002 to 2003 with Mean Ice Extent Contour
September Mean Sea Ice ...
DMSP/SSMI
The color bar used to g...
 
Hubble Uncovers Surprisingly Complex Structures in Radio Galaxies
Hubble Uncovers Surpris...
3C265
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Hubble Reveals Stellar Fireworks Accompanying Galaxy Collisions
Hubble Reveals Stellar ...
Eagle Nebula
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
More Images of PKS 1127...
 
NGC 891: Shadow Reveals...
 
Illustration of Absorpt...
 
X-ray Spectrum of PKS 2...
 
X-ray Image of NGC 891
 
1.2 arcmin per side
 
Neuraminidase Ribbon Diagram
Neuraminidase Ribbon Di...
2004-04-15
 
Neuraminidase
Neuraminidase
2004-04-15
 
Nile Delta Dust Storm
Nile Delta Dust Storm
On April 17, 2007, dese...<a href="http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov"></a><a href="http://terra.nasa.gov/"></a><a href="http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov"></a>
Terra- MODIS
 
Jupiter's Great Dark Spot
Jupiter's Great Dark Sp...
CONTOUR
Seventeenth century
 
Media Type Image
Supernova Remnant Imaged in Gamma Rays
Supernova Remnant Image...
CONTOUR
 
Media Type Image
X-Ray Ring Around SN1987A
X-Ray Ring Around SN198...
CONTOUR
 
Media Type Image
The Rhesus monkey, Sam, after his ride in the LJ-2 spacecraft
The Rhesus monkey, Sam,...
The Rhesus monkey, Sam,...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
The Rhesus monkey, Sam, with Mercury fiberglass couch
The Rhesus monkey, Sam,...
The test subject, a rhe...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
The Rhesus monkey, Miss Sam, with fiberglass couch, prepared for LJ-1B flight
The Rhesus monkey, Miss...
The test subject, a rhe...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
Shahdad, Southeast Iran, Radar Interferometry -- Silent Earthquake, Perspective View
Shahdad, Southeast Iran...
: Fielding, E.J., Wrigh...<a href="http://www.gsajournals.org/gsaonline/?request=get-current-toc&issn=0091-7613"></a><a href="http://techreports.jpl.nasa.gov/2004/2004-cit.html"></a>
Sol (our sun)
Synthetic Aperture Rada...
 
Enceladus: The Plot Thickens
Enceladus: The Plot Thi...
This graphic shows Cass...<a href="http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov"></a><a href="http://ciclops.org"></a>
Saturn
Composite Infrared Spec...
 
Nighttime Temperatures on Southern Io
Nighttime Temperatures ...
http://galileo.jpl.nasa...
Jupiter
Photopolarimeter-Radiom...
 
Scarps Confined to Crater Floors - High Resolution
Scarps Confined to Crat...
The scarp in this 35-ki...<a href="http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02433"></a>
Sol (our sun)
Imaging Science Subsyst...
 
An Intimate Look at a Martian Crater
An Intimate Look at a M...
This 3-D contour map sh...
Sol (our sun)
Panoramic Camera
 
Opportunity's Path
Opportunity's Path
This Long Term Planning...
Sol (our sun)
Navigation Camera
 
Layers in Galle Crater
Layers in Galle Crater
</a> Click on image for lar...<a href="http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_002655_1280" class="external free" target="wpext"></a>
Sol (our sun)
HiRISE
 
Layers in Galle Crater
Layers in Galle Crater
</a> Click on image for lar...<a href="http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_002655_1280" class="external free" target="wpext"></a>
Sol (our sun)
HiRISE
 
The Rhesus monkey, Sam, with Mercury fiberglass couch
The Rhesus monkey, Sam,...
The test subject, a rhe...
10.23.1963
Image
 
11-Inch High Speed Tunnel
11-Inch High Speed Tunn...
11-Inch High Speed Tunn...
02.15.1933
Image
 
The Rhesus monkey, Miss Sam, with fiberglass couch, prepared for LJ-1B flight
The Rhesus monkey, Miss...
The test subject, a rhe...
12.04.1959
Image
 
NASP-Computer Aided Design Computational Fluid Dynamics
NASP-Computer Aided Des...
In the photograph, the ...
06.06.1988
Image
 
In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, cuts a High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tile on a gun stock contour milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttle orbiter?s external surface is shielded from heat by a network of more than 24,000 tiles formed from a silica fiber compound. HRSI tiles cover the lower surface of the orbiter, areas around the forward windows, upper body flap, the base heat shield, the "eyeballs" on the front of the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods, and the leading and trailing edges of the vertical stabilizer and the rudder speed brake. They are generally 6 inches square, but may also be as large as 12 inches square in some areas, and 1 to 5 inches thick. More advanced materials such as Flexible Insulation Blankets have replaced tiles on some upper surfaces of the orbiter
In the Tile Fabrication...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE MOUNTED IN THE PROPULSION SYSTEMS LABORATORY PSL NO. 2 TEST CELL
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE M...
Image
 
15 DEGREE CONICAL NOZZLE - TITAN TRANSTAGE CONTOUR ENGINE - APOLLO
15 DEGREE CONICAL NOZZL...
Image
 
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
Image
 
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
Image
 
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
APOLLO CONTOUR ENGINE
Image
 
Ultra-Efficient Technology, Proof of Concept Compressor, Two-Stage Compressor; P/N 5804077A9, S/N 59 & 64 - first stator vane contour from aft and forward - UEET 2 stage compressor
Ultra-Efficient Technol...
Image
 
Ultra-Efficient Technology, Proof of Concept Compressor, Two-Stage Compressor; P/N 5804077A9, S/N 24 & 26 - second stator vane contour from aft and forward - UEET 2 stage compressor
Ultra-Efficient Technol...
Image
 
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02654 PIA02712 (FOR RELEASE: 17 February 2000) --- This topographic image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, the damage would run into billions of dollars, scientist estimate, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps. This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 144 km (90 miles) x 52 km (32 miles) Location: 34.5 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02656 PIA02714 (For Release: 17 February 2000) --- This topographic radar image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, scientists say the damage would run into billions of dollars, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The Lancaster/Palmdale area appears as bright patches just below the center of the image and the San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 144 km (90 miles) x 52 km (32 miles) Location: 34.5 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02742 PIA02720 (Release Date: 18 February 2000) --- This topographic radar image shows the city of Honolulu, Hawaii and adjacent areas on the island of Oahu. Honolulu lies on the south shore of the island, right of center of the image. Just below the center is Pearl Harbor, marked by several inlets and bays. Runways of the airport can be seen to the right of Pearl Harbor. Diamond Head, an extinct volcanic crater, is a blue circle along the coast right of center. The Koolau mountain range runs through the center of the image. The steep cliffs on the north side of the range are thought to be remnants of massive landslides that ripped apart the volcanic mountains that built the island thousands of years ago. On the north shore of the island are the Mokapu Peninsula and Kaneohe Bay. High resolution topographic data allow ecologists and planners to assess the effects of urban development on the sensitive ecosystems in tropical regions. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 56 by 56 kilometers (35 by 35 miles) Location: 21.4 deg. North lat., 157.8 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper left Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 18, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02651 PIA02710 (Release Date: 16 February 2000) --- This shaded relief topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are five rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, Zhilovaya, and Kakhtana. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in yellow. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the "spine" of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions. This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from red through green back to red) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 240 km (150 miles) x 122 km (77 miles) Location: 57.5 deg. North lat., 158.8 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 12, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
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