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751-759 of 759
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
AS17-145-22183 (7 - 19 December 1972) --- One of the Apollo 17 crew took this picture of a large boulder field during lunar surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view is looking northeast. Apollo 17 was the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo Program. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
AS17-140-21497 (13 December 1972) --- Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. Schmitt is the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot. This picture was taken by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander. While Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
AS17-152-23272 (December 1972) --- The crescent Earth rises above the lunar horizon in this photograph taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar-orbit during National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
AS17-147-22526 (11 December 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander, makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) during the early part of the first Apollo 17 Extravehicular Activity (EVA-1) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view of the "stripped down" LRV is prior to loading up. Equipment later loaded onto the LRV included the ground-controlled television assembly, the lunar communications relay unit, hi-gain antenna, low-gain antenna, aft tool pallet, lunar tools and scientific gear. This photograph was taken by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. The mountain in the right background is the east end of South Massif. While astronaut's Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
AS17-145-22216 (December 1972) --- In this view looking out the Lunar Module (LM) windows shows the United States Flag on the Moon's surface. This view looks toward the north Massif. The LM thrusters can be seen in foreground. While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the LM "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar orbit.
International Space Sta...
2006-05-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS014-S-001 (May 2006) --- This emblem embodies the past, present, and future of human space exploration. The Roman numeral XIV suspended above the Earth against the black background of space symbolizes the fourteenth expeditionary mission to the International Space Station (ISS), or ????????????? ??????????? ???????. Elements of this symbol merge into a unified trajectory destined for the moon, Mars, and beyond, much as science and operations aboard the ISS today will pave the way for future missions to our celestial neighbors. The five stars honor the astronauts and cosmonauts of missions Apollo 1, Soyuz 1, Soyuz 11, Challenger, and Columbia, who gave their lives in the pursuit of knowledge and discovery. The NASA insignia for design for shuttle flights and station increments is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S72-55417 (1972) --- A close-up view of the plaque which the Apollo 17 astronauts will leave behind on the Moon during their lunar landing mission. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "America" in lunar-orbit. The seven by nine inch stainless steel plaque will be attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the LM's descent stage. Commerative plaques were also left on the Moon from Apollo 11, Apollo 12, Apollo 14, Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 astronauts.
STS-72 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S95-00360 (17 September 1992) --- Two international astronaut candidates and a NASA trainee tread water during a water survival training course at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, in Florida. Pictured in the foreground are Koichi Wakata (left), representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) and Jerry M. Linenger of NASA. In the background is mission specialist Marc Garneau, representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Garneau flew as a CSA payload specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger in October of 1984.
COLUMBIA Shuttle Missio...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS090-774-028 (29 April 1998) --- This view features a 13,980-foot mountain peak in Colorado?s Sangre de Cristo Mountains in Saguache County, photographed by crewmembers of the STS-90 Space Shuttle Columbia mission in April 1998. EDITOR?S NOTE: In June 2003, the summit was named ?Columbia Point? by the U.S. Department of Interior in memory of the STS-107 Space Shuttle Columbia crew, lost in an accident on February 1, 2003, and for the scientific exploration, technical excellence, and the dream of spaceflight for which the mission stood. Columbia Point is located on the east side of Kit Carson Mountain. On the northwest shoulder of the same mountain is Challenger Point, a peak previously named in memory of the Space Shuttle Challenger, which exploded soon after liftoff on January 28, 1986.
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