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STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-335-020 (1-12 March 2002) --- Astronaut Scott D. Altman, STS-109 mission commander, sleeps on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-349-027 (4 March 2002) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan, STS-109 payload commander and mission specialist, respectively, wearing the liquid cooling and ventilation garment that complements the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, are photographed on the mid deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia after the mission?s first session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The EVA-1 team replaced one of the telescope?s two second-generation solar arrays, which is also known as SA2, and a Diode Box Assembly. The solar array was replaced with a new, third-generation solar array, which is called SA3. The space walkers also did some prep work for STS-109?s other space walks.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-345-032 (1-12 March 2002) --- One of the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia photographed this west-looking view featuring the profile of the atmosphere and the setting sun. The shuttle was located over the Java Sea to the south of Kalimantan (Borneo) in Indonesia when this image was acquired. Visible to the right of the setting sun are cloud tops from some thunderstorms. The sun's reflection (bright spot over the setting sun) can be seen off the upper layers of the earth's atmosphere.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-331-010 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) heads back toward its normal routine, after a week of servicing and upgrading by the STS-109 astronaut crew on board the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-329-021 (1-12 March 2002) --- The horizon of a blue and white Earth and the blackness of space form the backdrop for this view of the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia, as seen through windows on the aft flight deck during the STS-109 mission. Pictured in the cargo bay is the Rigid Array Carrier (RAC) holding the new Hubble Solar Arrays. In its stowed position at right center of the frame is the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-331-005 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) heads back toward its normal routine, after a week of servicing and upgrading by the STS-109 astronaut crew on board the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-326-008 (5 March 2002) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino, mission specialist, works at the stowage area for the Hubble Space Telescope's port side solar array. Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman removed the old port solar array and stowed it in Columbia?s payload bay for a return to Earth. They then went on to install a third-generation solar array and its associated electrical components. Two crew mates had accomplished the same feat with the starboard array on the previous day.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-328-026 (5 March 2002) --- Perched on the end of the Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) arm, astronaut Michael J. Massimino, removes the old solar array on the port side of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman went on to replace the array with a new one. A day earlier, two other astronauts accomplished the same feat on the starboard side.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-328-018 (5 March 2002) --- Astronaut Michael J. Massimino, STS-109 mission specialist, peers into Columbia's crew cabin during a brief break in work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), latched down just a few feet behind him in Columbia's cargo bay. Astronauts Massimino and James H. Newman were making their second extravehicular activity (EVA) of the mission.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-348-004 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with its normal routine temporarily interrupted, is berthed in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Columbia prior to a week of servicing and upgrading by the STS-109 astronaut crew. A thin blue line of airglow pin-points Earth's horizon at sunrise.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-346-007 (1?12 March 2002) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, STS-109 mission specialist, looks over a procedures check list while occupying the pilot?s station on the forward flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-001 (August 2001) --- STS-109 is the fourth mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The mission patch depicts the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Shuttle Columbia over the North American continent. During the eleven-day mission, the crew of Columbia will rendezvous with the telescope and grapple and berth it to the Space Shuttle using the remote manipulator system. Then, a series of space walks will be performed to significantly upgrade HST?s scientific capabilities and power system. Inside of HST?s aperture is a portrayal of the spectacular Hubble Deep Field Image, representing the billions of stars and galaxies in the Universe. This Deep Field Image symbolizes all the major discoveries made possible by the Hubble Space Telescope over the last ten years, and all those to come following the installation of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) by the crew of STS-109. The ACS is the major scientific upgrade for this servicing mission and will dramatically increase HST?s ability to see deeper into our universe. To further extend HST?s discovery potential, a new cooling system will be added that will restore HST?s infrared capability. The telescope is also shown with the smaller, sturdier, and more efficient solar arrays that will be installed during the space walks on STS-109. When combined with a new Power Control Unit, these solar arrays will provide more power for use by the telescope and allow multiple scientific instruments to operate concurrently. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-093 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, temporarily hosted in the Space Shuttle Columbia?s cargo bay, is backdropped by a blue and white Earth.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-719-008 (5 March 2002) --- Astronauts Michael J. Massimino, STS-109 mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, works in tandem with astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, during this second session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Newman and Massimino replaced the second of the Hubble Space Telescope?s (HST) new solar arrays and its Diode Box Assembly and replaced the Reaction Wheel Assembly-1. The HST, illuminated by the sunrise, provides stark contrast to the blackness of space and the thin line of Earth?s atmosphere in this scene.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-092 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, STS-109 mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia?s Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm, unfolds a solar array during the mission?s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld (out of frame), payload commander, works in tandem with Linnehan during the space walk to replace one of the two Hubble Space Telescope?s (HST) second-generation solar arrays, which is also known as SA2, and a Diode Box Assembly. The solar array was replaced with a new, third-generation solar array, which is called SA3. The space walkers also did some prep work for STS-109?s other sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-00B (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-729-072 (9 March 2002) --- Looking westward, one of the STS-109 crew members photographed the newly serviced and upgraded Hubble Space Telescope (HST) near the earth's limb to the upper right of the center of this 70mm image. The Space Shuttle Columbia was located over the Atlantic Ocean southwest of the Cape Verde Islands when this image was acquired. Low to mid-altitude clouds are visible across the image. Some thunderstorms can be seen near the left center of the image as the sun reflects off the higher cloud tops.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-715-038 (4 March 2002) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld, STS-109 payload commander, works in tandem with astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, mission specialist, as the two devote their attention to the replacing one of the Hubble Space Telescope?s (HST) two second-generation solar arrays, which is also know as SA2, and a Diode Box Assembly. The solar array was replaced with a new, third-generation solar array, which is called SA3. Linnehan stands on a foot restraint on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia's Remote Manipulator System (RMS). The space walkers also did some prep work for STS-109?s other sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-063 (4 March 2002) --- One of the STS-109 astronauts in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm photo of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), latched down in the shuttle's cargo bay, prior to the first half of solar array replacement project. Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan on flight day four replaced the starboard panels during the mission's initial space walk. Astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino replaced the port array on the following day.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-718-102 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the Galapagos Islands. For orientation purposes, north is towards the bottom of the view. Most of the largest island in the Galapagos group, Isla Isabela, stretches across the middle of the frame. The circular feature on this island at bottom is Volcano Wolf (1707 meters in altitude). Volcano Darwin (1280 meters in sea level) is the next volcano above and to the left, partly ringed with cloud. The single island top right is Isla Fernandina, the top of another volcano (1547 meters). Recent lava flows appear as darker surfaces and the older surfaces appear green, as a result of unusual rains and vegetational greening in this normally arid part of the world. The Equator passes exactly through Volcano Wolf, roughly left to right.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-003 (8 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, STS-109 payload commander, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia?s Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm, moves toward the giant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) temporarily hosted in the orbiter?s cargo bay. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan works in tandem with Grunsfeld during this fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Activities for the space walk centered around the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) to install a Cryogenic Cooler and its Cooling System Radiator.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-005 (1 March 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its 27th flight in the pre-dawn hours from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff for STS-109 occurred at 6:22:02:08 a.m., EST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five space walks. On board the spacecraft were astronauts Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-054 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), backdropped against a horizon scene while in the grasp of the Space Shuttle Columbia's robotic arm, was captured by the STS-109 crew members on flight day three. Moments later, the giant telescope was locked down in the shuttle's cargo bay, where it went on to remain for almost a week as the crew members performed five space walks in five days to service and upgrade it.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-716-025 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, STS-109 mission specialist, anchored on the end of the Space Shuttle Columbia?s Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm, unfolds a solar array during the mission?s first scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld (out of frame), payload commander, works in tandem with Linnehan during the space walk to replace one of the two Hubble Space Telescope?s (HST) second-generation solar arrays, which is also know as SA2, and a Diode Box Assembly. The solar array was replaced with a new, third-generation solar array, which is called SA3. The space walkers also did some prep work for STS-109?s other sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-013 (12 March 2002)--- The Space Shuttle Columbia, with its crew of seven astronauts on board, touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-109 to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST with mission elapsed time of 10 days, 22 hours, 11 minutes. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown an 4:32:02. It was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-006 (1 March 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its 27th flight in the pre-dawn hours from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff for STS-109 occurred at 6:22:02:08 a.m., EST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five space walks. On board the spacecraft were astronauts Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-730-027 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), sporting new solar arrays and other important but less visible new hardware, begins its separation from the Space Shuttle Columbia. The STS-109 crew deployed the giant telescope at 4:04 a.m. CST (1004 GMT), March 9, 2002. Afterward, the seven crewmembers began to focus their attention to the trip home, scheduled for March 12. The STS-109 astronauts conducted five space walks to service and upgrade Hubble.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-007 (1 March 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its 27th flight in the pre-dawn hours from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff for STS-109 occurred at 6:22:02:08 a.m., EST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five space walks. On board the spacecraft were astronauts Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-064 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-719-076 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring part of the eastern sea board. The oblique view looks northward from South Florida to the southern Appalachians. Most of the southeastern United States appears in crisp, clear air in the wake of a cold front that has pushed well off the mainland. Only a few jet stream and low-level clouds remain over South Florida and Gulf Stream.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-038 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), in the grasp of the Space Shuttle Columbia's robotic arm, is captured by the STS-109 crew members on flight day three. Moments later, the giant telescope was locked down in the shuttle's cargo bay, where it went on to remain as the crew members performed five space walks in the following week to service and upgrade it.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-014 (8 March 2002) --- Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld (right) and Richard M. Linnehan, STS-109 payload commander and mission specialist, respectively, are photographed near the giant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) temporarily hosted in the Space Shuttle Columbia?s cargo bay at the close of the fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA). Activities for the space walk centered around the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) to install a Cryogenic Cooler and its Cooling System Radiator.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-713-062 (9 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope (partially obscured), photographed from one of the Space Shuttle Columbia?s windows, begins its separation from the orbiter as it is released from the remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm. The STS-109 crew deployed the giant telescope at 4:04 a.m. CST (1004 GMT), March 9, 2002. Afterward, the seven crewmembers began to focus their attention to the trip home, scheduled for March 12. The STS-109 astronauts conducted five space walks to service and upgrade Hubble.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-711-035 (7 March 2002) --- Two of Columbia's four spacewalkers--astronauts James H. Newman and Michael J. Massimino--participate in the first science instrument upgrade of the fourth Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission during the flight's fourth day of extravehicular activity (EVA). The two, with Newman on Columbia's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm, removed the Faint Object Camera to make room for the new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The HST, illuminated by the sunrise, provides stark contrast to the blackness of space in this scene. Arching between the telescope and one of the solar panels is the thin line of Earth?s atmosphere.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-714-035 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the greater metropolitan Houston, Texas area. The view direction is northwest, with Houston's downtown as the brightest region (center) where major highways converge. Interstate 10 is a fine line extending towards the lower right, around the north side of Galveston Bay, part of which appears in the lower right corner. The interstate also appears as a line cutting through the wooded parts of west Houston (just west of downtown). Bush Intercontinental Airport is the largest light patch on the view north of downtown, and lies next to Highway 59, a thin white line that stretches toward the right side of the picture. Forests of East Texas make the top right corner of the view a dark green.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-019 (1 March 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its 27th flight in the pre-dawn hours from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff for STS-109 occurred at 6:22:02:08 a.m., EST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five space walks. On board the spacecraft were astronauts Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-017 (12 March 2002)--- The Space Shuttle Columbia, with its crew of seven astronauts on board, approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-109 to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST with mission elapsed time of 10 days, 22 hours, 11 minutes. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown an 4:32:02. It was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-015 (12 March 2002) -- Posing in front of the Space Shuttle Columbia is the returning STS-109 crew. From left are astronauts James H. Newman, Michael J. Massimino, Nancy J. Currie, Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, John M. Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan . The crew returned to Earth after a successful 11-day mission servicing and upgrading the Hubble Space Telescope. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown at 4:32:02. Rollout time was 1 minute, 17 seconds. This was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-020 (1 March 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia passes through some pre-dawn clouds as it soars into the sky to begin its 27th flight, STS-109. Liftoff occurred at 6:22:02:08 a.m., EST (11:22:02:08 GMT). The goal of the mission is the maintenance and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope, to be carried out in five space walks. On board the spacecraft were astronauts Scott D. Altman, Duane G. Carey, Nancy J. Currie, John M. Grunsfeld, James H. Newman, Richard M. Linnehan and Michael J. Massimino.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-016 (12 March 2002)--- The Space Shuttle Columbia, with its crew of seven astronauts on board, approaches touchdown on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-109 to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Wheel stop occurred on orbit 165 at 4:33:09 a.m. EST with mission elapsed time of 10 days, 22 hours, 11 minutes. Main gear touchdown occurred at 4:31:52 a.m. and nose wheel touchdown an 4:32:02. It was the 58th landing at KSC out of 108 missions in the history of the Shuttle program.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-S-022 (1 March 2002) --- The STS-109 crew members wave to onlookers as they stride out from the Operations and Checkout Building, eager to get to the launch pad. They are, from front to back, Duane G. Carey (left) and Scott D. Altman (right); Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist; John M. Grunsfeld (left), payload commander, and Richard M. Linnehan (right); James H. Newman (left) and Michael J. Massimino (right), all mission specialists. On mission STS-109, the crew will capture the Hubble Space Telescope using Columbia's robotic arm and secure it on a work stand in Columbia's payload bay. Four members of the crew will perform five scheduled space walks to complete system upgrades to the telescope. Mission STS-109 is the 27th flight of the orbiter Columbia and the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS112-704-142 (7-18 October 2002) --- (For orientation purposes, north is toward the top left corner). Green colors of the forests of the Cascade Mountains dominate this view, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis. Browner colors (top right) are the semiarid plains of the Columbia Basin, in the rain shadow of the Cascades. The highest peaks in this part of the Cascades are four volcanoes. The amount of snow is a good indication of their altitude. The highest is Mt. Rainier (14,410 feet) with the greatest amount of white snow (top left). Seattle lies immediately downslope (top left margin). Mt. Adams (12,276) lies due south in the middle of the view. Mt. Hood (11,235 feet) in the lower right corner, lies south of the great gorge of the Columbia River (which crosses the lower right and then the lower left corners of the view). The river flows broadly west (left) to the Pacific Ocean (out of the picture left). Mt. St Helens (8,364 feet), the snow-free brown patch lower left, was too low to retain snow after the recent fall. According to geologists studying the STS-112 photography, even from the altitude of the Space Shuttle, the intact south half of the cone can be discerned. The geologists point out that the famous blast of 1980 not only destroyed the north side of the cone but blew down the green forest for many square miles on the north side (brown signature).
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description STS114-S-001 (March 2004) --- The STS-114 patch design signifies the return of the Space Shuttle to flight and honors the memory of the STS-107 Columbia crew. The blue Shuttle rising above Earth?s horizon includes the Columba constellation of seven stars, echoing the STS-107 patch and commemorating the seven members of that mission. The crew of STS-114 will carry the memory of their friends on Columbia and the legacy of their mission back into Earth orbit. The dominant design element of the STS-114 patch is the planet Earth, which represents the unity and dedication of the many people whose efforts allow the Shuttle to safely return to flight. Against the background of the Earth at night, the blue orbit represents the International Space Station (ISS), with the EVA crewmembers named on the orbit. The red sun on the orbit signifies the contributions of the Japanese Space Agency to the mission and to the ISS program. The multi-colored Shuttle plume represents the broad spectrum of challenges for this mission, including Shuttle inspection and repair experiments, and International Space Station re-supply and repair. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced.
International Space Sta...
2007-04-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-19357 (12 April 2007) --- The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station participate in a conference with Russian space officials in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. From the left (front row) are cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov, Expedition 15 flight engineer; U.S. spaceflight participant Charles Simonyi; and cosmonaut Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Expedition 15 commander. From the left (back row) are astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer; cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, Expedition 14 flight engineer; and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14/15 flight engineer. The officials offered congratulations on the Cosmonautics Day in celebration of the 46th anniversary of the launching of Yuri Gagarin as the first human in space. The ground team also offered congratulations to Lopez-Alegria and Williams on the 26th anniversary of the launching of Columbia on the first space shuttle mission. Yurchikhin, Kotov and Tyurin represent Russia's Federal Space Agency.
International Space Sta...
2007-04-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-19352 (12 April 2007) --- The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station participate in a conference with Russian space officials in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. From the left (front row) are cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov, Expedition 15 flight engineer; U.S. spaceflight participant Charles Simonyi; and cosmonaut Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Expedition 15 commander. From the left (back row) are astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer; cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, Expedition 14 flight engineer; and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14/15 flight engineer. The officials offered congratulations on the Cosmonautics Day in celebration of the 46th anniversary of the launching of Yuri Gagarin as the first human in space. The ground team also offered congratulations to Lopez-Alegria and Williams on the 26th anniversary of the launching of Columbia on the first space shuttle mission. Yurchikhin, Kotov and Tyurin represent Russia's Federal Space Agency.
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