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Browse All : Dawn

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Earth and Moon
Earth and Moon
4/2/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Liftoff!
Liftoff!
NASA
2/6/09
 
Year 2009
The Upper Stack
The Upper Stack
NASA
2/19/09
 
Year 2009
Up and Away
Up and Away
12/16/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Hang Time
Hang Time
12/16/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Dawn of a New Era
Dawn of a New Era
2/16/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Discovery's Dawn
Discovery's Dawn
8/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
The Journey Home
The Journey Home
9/21/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Io Above Clouds on New Year's Day, 2001
Io Above Clouds on New ...
1/23/01
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2001
Alien Asteroid Belt Com...
 
Alien Asteroid Belt Com...
 
Alien Asteroid Belt Com...
 
Landing of the STS-114 orbiter Discovery
Landing of the STS-114 ...
08/09/05
 
Landing of the STS-114 orbiter Discovery
Landing of the STS-114 ...
08/09/05
 
Landing of the STS-114 orbiter Discovery
Landing of the STS-114 ...
08/09/05
 
STS-114 landing at Edwards Air Force Base
STS-114 landing at Edwa...
08/09/05
 
Dawn
Dawn
Image
 
The Earth-Moon System
The Earth-Moon System
Image
12.16.1992
 
Landsat Witnesses the Destruction of Mesopotamian Ecosystem
Landsat Witnesses the D...
Landsat-1/MSS
Landsat image in 1973 w...
 
Landsat Witnesses the Destruction of Mesopotamian Ecosystem
Landsat Witnesses the D...
Landsat-1/MSS
Landsat image in 2000 w...
 
Landsat Witnesses the Destruction of Mesopotamian Ecosystem
Landsat Witnesses the D...
Landsat-1/MSS
Mesopotamia 1973. Zoom ...
 
Landsat Witnesses the Destruction of Mesopotamian Ecosystem
Landsat Witnesses the D...
Landsat-1/MSS
Mesopotamia in March 20...
 
Landsat Witnesses the Destruction of Mesopotamian Ecosystem
Landsat Witnesses the D...
Landsat-1/MSS
Mesopotamia 2000
 
Mercury transit of the Sun
Mercury transit of the ...
TRACE
The dark spot is Mercur...
 
Mercury transit of the Sun
Mercury transit of the ...
TRACE
Mercury continues its m...
 
Mercury transit of the Sun
Mercury transit of the ...
TRACE
and keeps moving along.
 
Mercury transit of the Sun
Mercury transit of the ...
TRACE
Still going...
 
Mercury transit of the Sun
Mercury transit of the ...
TRACE
None
 
Mercury Transit from TRACE (White Light)
Mercury Transit from TR...
TRACE
Movie of Mercury passin...
 
Orbital Sunrise
Orbital Sunrise
Space Shuttle
10/11/1994
NASA
 
NASA Center Johnson Space Center
ASTP Saturn IB CDDT
ASTP Saturn IB CDDT
Apollo-Soyuz Test Proje...
7/2/1975
NASA
 
NASA Center Kennedy Space Center
STS-86 Rollout
STS-86 Rollout
Shuttle-Mir
8/18/1997
NASA
 
NASA Center Kennedy Space Center
Hubble Surveys Dying Stars in Nearby Galaxy
Hubble Surveys Dying St...
Large Magellanic Cloud
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
STS-102 Space Shuttle Discovery Liftoff
STS-102 Space Shuttle D...
2001-03-08
 
STS-121 Insignia
STS-121 Insignia
2005-06-09
 
STS-71 Mission Insignia
STS-71 Mission Insignia
1995-04-06
 
STS-74 Mission Insignia
STS-74 Mission Insignia
1995-07-07
 
X-34 Technology Demonstrator in High Bay
X-34 Technology Demonst...
2004-04-15
 
X-34 Poster Art
X-34 Poster Art
2004-04-15
 
Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic
Severe Floods Sweep Acr...
Over the past week, bot...</A></A><A href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
TRMM
 
Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic
Severe Floods Sweep Acr...
Over the past week, bot...</A></A><A href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
TRMM
 
Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic
Severe Floods Sweep Acr...
Over the past week, bot...</A></A><A href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
TRMM
 
Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic
Severe Floods Sweep Acr...
Over the past week, bot...</A></A><A href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
TRMM
 
Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic
Severe Floods Sweep Acr...
Over the past week, bot...</A></A><A href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
TRMM
 
Magnitude 6.1 Earthquake, Silakhor, Iran
Magnitude 6.1 Earthquak...
Just before dawn on Mar...<a href="http://www.iris.edu/gifs/animations/faults.htm"></a><a href="http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/srtm/"></a><a href="http://glcf.umiacs.umd.edu/index.shtml"></a>
Space Shuttle- SRTM
 
Scott Crossfield joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA--the predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA) at its High Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, Calif., as a research pilot in June, 1950. During the next five years, he flew the X-1, X-4, X-5, XF-92A, and D-558-I and -II aircraft, accumulating 87 rocket flights in the X-1 and D-558-II aircraft, plus 12 flights in the latter aircraft employing only jet power. He made aeronautical history on November 20, 1953, when he reached the aviation milestone of Mach 2 (twice the speed of sound) or more than 1,320 miles per hour in the D-558-II Skyrocket. Taken aloft in the supersonic, swept-wing research aircraft by a Boeing P2B Superfortress "mother ship" (the Navy designation of the B-29), he dropped clear of the bomber at 32,000 feet and climbed to 72,000 feet before diving to 62,000 feet where he became the first pilot to fly more than twice the speed of sound. His flight was part of a carefully planned program of flight research with the Skyrocket that featured incremental increases in speed while NACA instrumentation recorded the flight data at each increment. Following his five years at the Edwards unit (redesignated the NACA High Speed Flight Station in 1954), Crossfield left the NACA in 1955 to work for North American Aviation on the design and building of the X-15 rocket-powered airplane. There, he served as both pilot and design consultant for the revolutionary new aircraft. Responsible for many of the operational and safety features incorporated into the X-15, Crossfield guided the rocket-powered airplane on its first free flight in 1959 and subsequently qualified the first two X-15s for flight before North American turned them over to NASA and the U.S. Air Force. He flew the two aircraft a total of 14 times (not counting 16 captive flights), reaching a maximum speed of Mach 2.97 (1,960 miles per hour) and a maximum altitude of 88,116 feet. In 1960, Crossfield published his autobiography (written with Clay Blair, Jr.), Always Another Dawn: The Story of a Rocket Test Pilot (New York: Arno Press, reprinted 1971). There he covered his life through the completion of the early X-15 flights. Crossfield also served for five years as System Director responsible for systems test, reliability engineering, and quality assurance for North American Aviation on the Hound Dog missile, Paraglider, Apollo Command and Service Module, and the Saturn V second stage. Then from 1966 to 1967 he served as Technical Director, Research Engineering and Test at North American Aviation. Crossfield served as an executive for Eastern Airlines from 1967 to 1973. Then from 1974 to 1975, he was Senior Vice President for Hawker Siddley Aviation, setting up its U.S. subsidiary for design, support, and marketing of the HS-146 transport in North America. From 1977 until his retirement in 1993, he served as technical consultant to the House Committee on Science
Scott Crossfield - Port...
1954
 
Description Scott Crossfield joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA--the predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA) at its High Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, Calif., as a research pilot in June, 1950. During the next five years, he flew the X-1, X-4, X-5, XF-92A, and D-558-I and -II aircraft, accumulating 87 rocket flights in the X-1 and D-558-II aircraft, plus 12 flights in the latter aircraft employing only jet power. He made aeronautical history on November 20, 1953, when he reached the aviation milestone of Mach 2 (twice the speed of sound) or more than 1,320 miles per hour in the D-558-II Skyrocket. Taken aloft in the supersonic, swept-wing research aircraft by a Boeing P2B Superfortress "mother ship" (the Navy designation of the B-29), he dropped clear of the bomber at 32,000 feet and climbed to 72,000 feet before diving to 62,000 feet where he became the first pilot to fly more than twice the speed of sound. His flight was part of a carefully planned program of flight research with the Skyrocket that featured incremental increases in speed while NACA instrumentation recorded the flight data at each increment. Following his five years at the Edwards unit (redesignated the NACA High Speed Flight Station in 1954), Crossfield left the NACA in 1955 to work for North American Aviation on the design and building of the X-15 rocket-powered airplane. There, he served as both pilot and design consultant for the revolutionary new aircraft. Responsible for many of the operational and safety features incorporated into the X-15, Crossfield guided the rocket-powered airplane on its first free flight in 1959 and subsequently qualified the first two X-15s for flight before North American turned them over to NASA and the U.S. Air Force. He flew the two aircraft a total of 14 times (not counting 16 captive flights), reaching a maximum speed of Mach 2.97 (1,960 miles per hour) and a maximum altitude of 88,116 feet. In 1960, Crossfield published his autobiography (written with Clay Blair, Jr.), Always Another Dawn: The Story of a Rocket Test Pilot (New York: Arno Press, reprinted 1971). There he covered his life through the completion of the early X-15 flights. Crossfield also served for five years as System Director responsible for systems test, reliability engineering, and quality assurance for North American Aviation on the Hound Dog missile, Paraglider, Apollo Command and Service Module, and the Saturn V second stage. Then from 1966 to 1967 he served as Technical Director, Research Engineering and Test at North American Aviation. Crossfield served as an executive for Eastern Airlines from 1967 to 1973. Then from 1974 to 1975, he was Senior Vice President for Hawker Siddley Aviation, setting up its U.S. subsidiary for design, support, and marketing of the HS-146 transport in North America. From 1977 until his retirement in 1993, he served as technical consultant to the House Committee on Science
The YF-12A (60-6935) carries the "coldwall" heat transfer pod on a pylon beneath the forward fuselage. The pod is seen with its insulating coating intact. In the background, the YF-12C flies photo chase. The coldwall project, supported by Langley Research Center, consisted of a stainless steel tube equipped with thermocouples and pressure-sensors. A special insulating coating covered the tube, which was chilled with liquid nitrogen. At Mach 3, the insulation could be pyrotechnically blown away from the tube, instantly exposing it to the thermal environment. The experiment caused many inflight difficulties, such as engine unstarts, but eventually researchers got a successful flight. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, "coldwall" research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the so-called YF-12C (SR-71A 61-7951, modified with YF-12A inlets and engines and a bogus tail number 06937). The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence "Kelly" Johnson. They were constructed mostly of titanium to withstand aerodynamic heating. Fueled by JP-7, the Blackbirds were capable of cruising at Mach 3.2 and attaining altitudes in excess of 80,000 feet. The first version, a CIA reconnaissance aircraft that first flew in April 1962 was called the A-12. An interceptor version was developed in 1963 under the designation YF-12A. A USAF reconnaissance variant, called the SR-71, was first flown in 1964. The A-12 and SR-71 designs included leading and trailing edges made of high-temperature fiberglass-asbestos laminates. The NASA YF-12 research program was
YF-12A and YF-12C in fl...
1975
 
Description The YF-12A (60-6935) carries the "coldwall" heat transfer pod on a pylon beneath the forward fuselage. The pod is seen with its insulating coating intact. In the background, the YF-12C flies photo chase. The coldwall project, supported by Langley Research Center, consisted of a stainless steel tube equipped with thermocouples and pressure-sensors. A special insulating coating covered the tube, which was chilled with liquid nitrogen. At Mach 3, the insulation could be pyrotechnically blown away from the tube, instantly exposing it to the thermal environment. The experiment caused many inflight difficulties, such as engine unstarts, but eventually researchers got a successful flight. The Flight Research Center's involvement with the YF-12A, an interceptor version of the Lockheed A-12, began in 1967. Ames Research Center was interested in using wind tunnel data that had been generated at Ames under extreme secrecy. Also, the Office of Advanced Research and Technology (OART) saw the YF-12A as a means to advance high-speed technology, which would help in designing the Supersonic Transport (SST). The Air Force needed technical assistance to get the latest reconnaissance version of the A-12 family, the SR-71A, fully operational. Eventually, the Air Force offered NASA the use of two YF-12A aircraft, 60-6935 and 60-6936. A joint NASA-USAF program was mapped out in June 1969. NASA and Air Force technicians spent three months readying 935 for flight. On 11 December 1969, the flight program got underway with a successful maiden flight piloted by Col. Joe Rogers and Maj. Gary Heidelbaugh of the SR-71/F-12 Test Force. During the program, the Air Force concentrated on military applications, and NASA pursued a loads research program. NASA studies included inflight heating, skin-friction cooling, "coldwall" research (a heat transfer experiment), flowfield studies, shaker vane research, and tests in support of the Space Shuttle landing program. Ultimately, 935 became the workhorse of the program, with 146 flights between 11 December 1969 and 7 November 1979. The second YF-12A, 936, made 62 flights. It was lost in a non-fatal crash on 24 June 1971. It was replaced by the so-called YF-12C (SR-71A 61-7951, modified with YF-12A inlets and engines and a bogus tail number 06937). The Lockheed A-12 family, known as the Blackbirds, were designed by Clarence "Kelly" Johnson. They were constructed mostly of titanium to withstand aerodynamic heating. Fueled by JP-7, the Blackbirds were capable of cruising at Mach 3.2 and attaining altitudes in excess of 80,000 feet. The first version, a CIA reconnaissance aircraft that first flew in April 1962 was called the A-12. An interceptor version was developed in 1963 under the designation YF-12A. A USAF reconnaissance variant, called the SR-71, was first flown in 1964. The A-12 and SR-71 designs included leading and trailing edges made of high-temperature fiberglass-asbestos laminates. The NASA YF-12 research program was
SR-71 Receiving Flight ...
As the first traces of ...
1992
 
A Magellanic Starfield
A Magellanic Starfield
Dawn
 
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