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Space Eyes See Comet Te...
 
Deep Impact
Deep Impact
Image
 
Preparing Deep Impact
Preparing Deep Impact
Image
10.18.2004
 
Bull's Eye!
Bull's Eye!
Image
07.04.2005
 
Deep Impact: Chandra Mo...
Comet 9P/Tempel 1
 
Deep Impact on Comet Tempel 1 from Hubble
Deep Impact on Comet Te...
Deep Impact
 
Media Type Image
Wild Duck Cluster
Wild Duck Cluster
On April 7, 2005, the D...
Impactor Target Sensor ...
 
The Making of Deep Impact
The Making of Deep Impa...
This image shows NASA's...
Impactor
 
A Game of Space Telephone
A Game of Space Telepho...
This image shows NASA's...
Impactor
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., guide the high-gain communications antenna toward the attach-point on the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the high-gain communications antenna is ready for installation on the Deep Impact spacecraft (behind it). A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the flight battery has been installed on the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., begin lifting the high-gain communications antenna to attach it to an overhead crane. The antenna will be installed on the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians check the flight battery for the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft before installation at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., watch as the high-gain communications antenna is moved toward the Deep Impact spacecraft for installation. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The flight battery for the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft awaits installation at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., attach equipment to the flight battery to move it to the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft for installation. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., watch as the high-gain communications antenna is lowered toward the Deep Impact spacecraft for installation. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., secure the high-gain communications antenna onto the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., make sure the crane is securely attached to the high-gain communications antenna to be installed on the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians prepare the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft for installation of the flight battery at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., take a final look at the flight battery before moving and installing it on the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the flight battery has been installed on the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., attach on overhead crane to the high-gain communications antenna to be installed on the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., a Ball Aerospace technician helps guide the flight battery toward the flyby spacecraft on Deep Impact where it will be installed. About the size of a Ford Explorer, the flyby spacecraft is three-axis stabilized and uses a fixed solar array and a small NiH2 battery for its power system. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. During the encounter phase when the comet collides with the impactor projectile propelled into its path, the spacecraft?s high-gain antenna will transmit near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., attach the high-gain communications antenna onto the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Ball Aerospace technicians at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., guide the high-gain communications antenna toward the attach-point on the Deep Impact spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. During the encounter phase, the high-gain antenna transmits near-real-time images of the impact back to Earth. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch Jan. 8 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., Boeing Delta II interstage adapter reaches the pad after being removed from the center body section. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., a technician works inside the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter, which is being removed. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., a Boeing worker removes a protective cover before the replacement interstage adapter is lowered toward the Boeing Delta II below. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The replacement interstage adapter for the Boeing Delta II launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft is ready to be lifted up the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is seen being lowered toward the pad. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is being lowered out of the tower. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The replacement interstage adapter for the Boeing Delta II launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft is lifted up the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is being removed. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is lifted away from the center body section. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., a technician works inside the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter, which is being removed. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is being lowered out of the tower. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Boeing workers stand by as the replacement interstage adapter for the Boeing Delta II is lowered. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is seen being lowered toward the pad. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Boeing workers aid in lowering the replacement interstage adapter toward the Boeing Delta II below. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the mobile service tower on Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station , Fla., the Boeing Delta II interstage adapter is being lifted away from the center body section. The interstage adapter was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. It will be replaced, and the second stage previously removed will be re-installed within a few days. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., a Boeing worker aids in lowering the replacement interstage adapter toward the Boeing Delta II below. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Boeing technicians work at attaching the replacement interstage adapter to the center body section of the Boeing Delta II rocket. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the Deep Impact spacecraft. Boeing workers will attach the adapter to the rocket?s center body section. Later the second stage, which was removed to allow access to the previous adapter, will be reattached. The first adapter was removed after it was found to be faulty during a review of launch vehicle hardware. Launch of Deep Impact is now scheduled no earlier than Jan. 12.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe reports to employees on the state of the Agency from the Press Site Auditorium. The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe (right) is accompanied on stage in the Press Site Auditorium by Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle for a report to employees on the state of the Agency. The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe reports to employees on the state of the Agency from the Press Site Auditorium. The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe (center) is presented with a Deep Impact hat in the Press Site Auditorium following his report to employees on the state of the Agency. He is accompanied on stage by Center Director Jim Kennedy (right). The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Press Site Auditorium, NASA managers and employees listen to NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe's report on the state of the Agency. The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O?Keefe (right) is accompanied on stage in the Press Site Auditorium by Center Director Jim Kennedy for a report to employees on the state of the Agency. The update was broadcast live via NASA Television. O'Keefe focused on the achievements of 2004 and the goals set for 2005. His remarks emphasized the milestones met in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, including the launch of the comet-chasing Deep Impact mission and the landing of the Huygens probe on Jupiter?s moon Titan, both occurring in the past two days, and the progress made in meeting the requirements to return the Space Shuttle to flight. O?Keefe?s briefing included a dialogue with Associate Administrator of NASA?s Office of Exploration Systems Craig Steidle and Center Director Jim Kennedy, live; and Manager of the Space Station Office Bill Gerstenmaier and Director of Advanced Planning and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Charles Elachi, via satellite.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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