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Total Eclipse of the Sun
Total Eclipse of the Su...
6/9/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Handle on the Sun
Handle on the Sun
Image
09.14.1999
 
STEREO's Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI)
STEREO's Extreme UltraV...
STEREO
A full-resolution image...
 
Series of Images from SOHO
Series of Images from S...
Sun
02/11/1996
NASA
 
NASA Center Goddard Space Flight Center
On 2007 February 8, the SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) became the first spaceborne solar imager to observe a complete solar cycle. EIT has now been observing for the mean length of a solar cycle, 11.1 years, since its first image was obtained on 1996 January 2. SOHO is the first solar observatory in space to observe a complete solar cycle. It has the unique opportunity of offering a retrospective reaching back over an entire solar cycle. So we can select and compare images and movies of the Sun almost exactly 10 years apart. We took a snapshot of the several weeks (January 15 - February 5, 2007) and pulled together frames from ten years ago (January 15 - February. 13, 1997). The Sun is fairly close to solar minimum (its lowest level of solar activity) for both of these periods, so one would expect both sequences to show a similar level of activity. In fact, it does. We see very few active regions and no major solar storms. It would appear that the 1997 frames are a little crisper with a bit more sharpness. Well, 11 years of staring at the Sun has probably taken a toll on the CCD imager. Still, what is most remarkable is that a single spacecraft has held up so well and produced such a long and valuable observation record, a record that scientists around the world are studying and analyzing every day.
On 2007 February 8, the...
Image
 
Description On 2007 February 8, the SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) became the first spaceborne solar imager to observe a complete solar cycle. EIT has now been observing for the mean length of a solar cycle, 11.1 years, since its first image was obtained on 1996 January 2. SOHO is the first solar observatory in space to observe a complete solar cycle. It has the unique opportunity of offering a retrospective reaching back over an entire solar cycle. So we can select and compare images and movies of the Sun almost exactly 10 years apart. We took a snapshot of the several weeks (January 15 - February 5, 2007) and pulled together frames from ten years ago (January 15 - February. 13, 1997). The Sun is fairly close to solar minimum (its lowest level of solar activity) for both of these periods, so one would expect both sequences to show a similar level of activity. In fact, it does. We see very few active regions and no major solar storms. It would appear that the 1997 frames are a little crisper with a bit more sharpness. Well, 11 years of staring at the Sun has probably taken a toll on the CCD imager. Still, what is most remarkable is that a single spacecraft has held up so well and produced such a long and valuable observation record, a record that scientists around the world are studying and analyzing every day.
Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) 304? image of a pair of similarly shaped prominences from 11 January 1998. Material in the He II line shown here is at temperatures of 60,000 to 80,000K.
Extreme ultraviolet Ima...
Image
 
Description Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) 304? image of a pair of similarly shaped prominences from 11 January 1998. Material in the He II line shown here is at temperatures of 60,000 to 80,000K.
Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) 304Å image of a pair of similarly shaped prominences from 11 January 1998 Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 2 0 2001-12-26T16:53:00Z 2001-12-26T16:53:00Z 1 28 163 NASA GSGC 1 1 200 9.2511 150 A collage of prominences, which are huge clouds of relatively cool dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, thin corona. At times, they can erupt, escaping the Sun's atmosphere. For all four images, emission in this spectral line of EIT 304Å shows the upper chromosphere at a temperature of about 60,000 degrees K. The hottest areas appear almost white, while the darker red areas indicate cooler temperatures.  Going clockwise from the upper left, the images are from: 15 May 2001; 28 March 2000; 18 January 2000, and 2 February 2001.
Extreme ultraviolet Ima...
Image
 
Description Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) 304Å image of a pair of similarly shaped prominences from 11 January 1998 Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 2 0 2001-12-26T16:53:00Z 2001-12-26T16:53:00Z 1 28 163 NASA GSGC 1 1 200 9.2511 150 A collage of prominences, which are huge clouds of relatively cool dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, thin corona. At times, they can erupt, escaping the Sun's atmosphere. For all four images, emission in this spectral line of EIT 304Å shows the upper chromosphere at a temperature of about 60,000 degrees K. The hottest areas appear almost white, while the darker red areas indicate cooler temperatures.  Going clockwise from the upper left, the images are from: 15 May 2001; 28 March 2000; 18 January 2000, and 2 February 2001.
A composite image of the Sun that depicts the range of SOHO?s scientific research -- The interior image from MDI illustrates the rivers of plasma discovered flowing under the Sun?s surface. The surface image was taken with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at 304Å. Both were superimposed on a Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) C2 image, which blocks the Sun so that it can view the corona in visible. The image suggests the range of SOHO's research from the solar interior, to the surface and corona, and out to the solar wind.
A composite image of th...
Image
 
Description A composite image of the Sun that depicts the range of SOHO?s scientific research -- The interior image from MDI illustrates the rivers of plasma discovered flowing under the Sun?s surface. The surface image was taken with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at 304Å. Both were superimposed on a Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) C2 image, which blocks the Sun so that it can view the corona in visible. The image suggests the range of SOHO's research from the solar interior, to the surface and corona, and out to the solar wind.
Erupting Sun
Erupting Sun
Extreme Ultraviolet Ima...
 
Media Type Image
Handle-shaped Prominence
Handle-shaped Prominenc...
Extreme Ultraviolet Ima...<a target="_blank" href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov"></a>
Extreme Ultraviolet Ima...
 
Color Composite of Solar Features
Color Composite of Sola...
This composite image co...<a target="_blank" href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov"></a>
Extreme Ultraviolet Ima...
 
Handle-shaped Prominence
Handle-shaped Prominenc...
Extreme Ultraviolet Ima...<a target="_blank" href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov"></a>
09.14.1999
Image
 
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