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A close up of the Flight Test Fixture II, mounted on the underside of the F-15B Aerodynamic Flight Facility aircraft. The Thermal Protection System (TPS)samples, which included metallic Inconel tiles, soft Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation tiles, and sealing materials, were attached to the forward-left side position of the test fixture. In-flight video from the aircraft's on-board video system, as well as chase aircraft photos and video footage, documented the condition of the TPS during flights. Surface pressures over the TPS was measured by thermocouples contained in instrumentation "islands," to document shear and shock loads.
Closeup of F-15B Flight...
14 May 1998
Carla Thomas
 
Description A close up of the Flight Test Fixture II, mounted on the underside of the F-15B Aerodynamic Flight Facility aircraft. The Thermal Protection System (TPS)samples, which included metallic Inconel tiles, soft Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation tiles, and sealing materials, were attached to the forward-left side position of the test fixture. In-flight video from the aircraft's on-board video system, as well as chase aircraft photos and video footage, documented the condition of the TPS during flights. Surface pressures over the TPS was measured by thermocouples contained in instrumentation "islands," to document shear and shock loads.
A flight experiment called conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., successfully demonstrated a new software data analysis tool, the flutterometer, which is designed to increase the efficiency of flight flutter testing. The photo shows the experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted piezoelectric strain actuators. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft. Five flights consisted of increasing speeds and altitudes leading to the final test point of Mach .85 at an altitude of 10,000 feet. At each Mach and altitude, stability estimations of the wing were made using accelerometer measurements in response to the piezoelectric actuator excitation. The test wing was intentionally flown to the point of structural failure, resulting in about a third of the 18-inch wing breaking off. This allowed engineers to record the effectiveness of the flutterometer over the entire regime of flutter testing, up to and including structural failure. Research objectives of the ATW experiment included validation of the new flutterometer, validation of aerodynamic load predictions on the test wing, and analytical strain gage calibration techniques.
The Aerostructures Test...
March 28, 2001
 
Description A flight experiment called conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., successfully demonstrated a new software data analysis tool, the flutterometer, which is designed to increase the efficiency of flight flutter testing. The photo shows the experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted piezoelectric strain actuators. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft. Five flights consisted of increasing speeds and altitudes leading to the final test point of Mach .85 at an altitude of 10,000 feet. At each Mach and altitude, stability estimations of the wing were made using accelerometer measurements in response to the piezoelectric actuator excitation. The test wing was intentionally flown to the point of structural failure, resulting in about a third of the 18-inch wing breaking off. This allowed engineers to record the effectiveness of the flutterometer over the entire regime of flutter testing, up to and including structural failure. Research objectives of the ATW experiment included validation of the new flutterometer, validation of aerodynamic load predictions on the test wing, and analytical strain gage calibration techniques.
A flight experiment called the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., successfully demonstrated a new software data analysis tool, the flutterometer, which is designed to increase the efficiency of flight flutter testing. The photo shows the experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted piezoelectric strain actuators, undergoing ground testing prior to flight. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft. Five flights consisted of increasing speeds and altitudes leading to the final test point of Mach .85 at an altitude of 10,000 feet. At each Mach and altitude, stability estimations of the wing were made using accelerometer measurements in response to the piezoelectric actuator excitation. The test wing was intentionally flown to the point of structural failure, resulting in about a third of the 18-inch wing breaking off. This allowed engineers to record the effectiveness of the flutterometer over the entire regime of flutter testing, up to and including structural failure. Research objectives of the ATW experiment included validation of the new flutterometer, validation of aerodynamic load predictions on the test wing, and analytical strain gage calibration techniques.
The Aerostructures Test...
March 28, 2001
 
Description A flight experiment called the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW) conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., successfully demonstrated a new software data analysis tool, the flutterometer, which is designed to increase the efficiency of flight flutter testing. The photo shows the experiment, which consisted of an 18-inch carbon fiber test wing with surface-mounted piezoelectric strain actuators, undergoing ground testing prior to flight. The test wing was mounted on a special ventral flight test fixture and flown on Dryden's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft. Five flights consisted of increasing speeds and altitudes leading to the final test point of Mach .85 at an altitude of 10,000 feet. At each Mach and altitude, stability estimations of the wing were made using accelerometer measurements in response to the piezoelectric actuator excitation. The test wing was intentionally flown to the point of structural failure, resulting in about a third of the 18-inch wing breaking off. This allowed engineers to record the effectiveness of the flutterometer over the entire regime of flutter testing, up to and including structural failure. Research objectives of the ATW experiment included validation of the new flutterometer, validation of aerodynamic load predictions on the test wing, and analytical strain gage calibration techniques.
NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's new in-house designed Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) is an airborne engine test facility that allows engineers to glean actual flight data on small experimental engines that would otherwise have to be gathered from traditional wind tunnels, ground test stands or laboratory setups. Now, with the "captive carry" capability of the PFTF, new air-breathing propulsion schemes, such as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engines, can be economically flight-tested using sub-scale experiments. The PFTF flew mated to NASA Dryden's specially-equipped supersonic F-15B research aircraft during December 2001 and January 2002. The PFTF, carried on the F-15B's centerline attachment point, underwent in-flight checkout, known as flight envelope expansion, in order to verify its design and capabilities. Envelope expansion for the PFTF included envelope clearance, which involves maximum performance testing. Top speed of the F-15B with the PFTF is Mach 2.0. Other elements of envelope clearance are flying qualities assessment and flutter analysis. Airflow visualization of the PFTF and a "stand-in" test engine was accomplished by attaching small tufts of nylon on them and videotaping the flow patterns revealed during flight. A surrogate experimental engine shape, called the cone tube, was flown attached to the force balance on the PFTF. The cone tube emulated the dimensional and mass properties of the maximum design load the PFTF can carry. As the F-15B put the PFTF and the attached cone tube through its paces, accurate data was garnered, allowing engineers to fully verify PFTF and force balance capabilities in real flight conditions. When the first actual experimental engine is ready to fly on the F-15B/PFTF, engineers will have full confidence and knowledge of what they can accomplish with this "flying engine test stand."
NASA Dryden's new in-ho...
November 30, 2001
 
Description NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's new in-house designed Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) is an airborne engine test facility that allows engineers to glean actual flight data on small experimental engines that would otherwise have to be gathered from traditional wind tunnels, ground test stands or laboratory setups. Now, with the "captive carry" capability of the PFTF, new air-breathing propulsion schemes, such as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engines, can be economically flight-tested using sub-scale experiments. The PFTF flew mated to NASA Dryden's specially-equipped supersonic F-15B research aircraft during December 2001 and January 2002. The PFTF, carried on the F-15B's centerline attachment point, underwent in-flight checkout, known as flight envelope expansion, in order to verify its design and capabilities. Envelope expansion for the PFTF included envelope clearance, which involves maximum performance testing. Top speed of the F-15B with the PFTF is Mach 2.0. Other elements of envelope clearance are flying qualities assessment and flutter analysis. Airflow visualization of the PFTF and a "stand-in" test engine was accomplished by attaching small tufts of nylon on them and videotaping the flow patterns revealed during flight. A surrogate experimental engine shape, called the cone tube, was flown attached to the force balance on the PFTF. The cone tube emulated the dimensional and mass properties of the maximum design load the PFTF can carry. As the F-15B put the PFTF and the attached cone tube through its paces, accurate data was garnered, allowing engineers to fully verify PFTF and force balance capabilities in real flight conditions. When the first actual experimental engine is ready to fly on the F-15B/PFTF, engineers will have full confidence and knowledge of what they can accomplish with this "flying engine test stand."
NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's new in-house designed Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) is an airborne engine test facility that allows engineers to glean actual flight data on small experimental engines that would otherwise have to be gathered from traditional wind tunnels, ground test stands or laboratory setups. Now, with the "captive carry" capability of the PFTF, new air-breathing propulsion schemes, such as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engines, can be economically flight-tested using sub-scale experiments. The PFTF flew mated to NASA Dryden's specially-equipped supersonic F-15B research aircraft during December 2001 and January 2002. The PFTF, carried on the F-15B's centerline attachment point, underwent in-flight checkout, known as flight envelope expansion, in order to verify its design and capabilities. Envelope expansion for the PFTF included envelope clearance, which involves maximum performance testing. Top speed of the F-15B with the PFTF is Mach 2.0. Other elements of envelope clearance are flying qualities assessment and flutter analysis. Airflow visualization of the PFTF and a "stand-in" test engine was accomplished by attaching small tufts of nylon on them and videotaping the flow patterns revealed during flight. A surrogate experimental engine shape, called the cone tube, was flown attached to the force balance on the PFTF. The cone tube emulated the dimensional and mass properties of the maximum design load the PFTF can carry. As the F-15B put the PFTF and the attached cone tube through its paces, accurate data was garnered, allowing engineers to fully verify PFTF and force balance capabilities in real flight conditions. When the first actual experimental engine is ready to fly on the F-15B/PFTF, engineers will have full confidence and knowledge of what they can accomplish with this "flying engine test stand."
NASA Dryden's new in-ho...
November 30, 2001
 
Description NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's new in-house designed Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) is an airborne engine test facility that allows engineers to glean actual flight data on small experimental engines that would otherwise have to be gathered from traditional wind tunnels, ground test stands or laboratory setups. Now, with the "captive carry" capability of the PFTF, new air-breathing propulsion schemes, such as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engines, can be economically flight-tested using sub-scale experiments. The PFTF flew mated to NASA Dryden's specially-equipped supersonic F-15B research aircraft during December 2001 and January 2002. The PFTF, carried on the F-15B's centerline attachment point, underwent in-flight checkout, known as flight envelope expansion, in order to verify its design and capabilities. Envelope expansion for the PFTF included envelope clearance, which involves maximum performance testing. Top speed of the F-15B with the PFTF is Mach 2.0. Other elements of envelope clearance are flying qualities assessment and flutter analysis. Airflow visualization of the PFTF and a "stand-in" test engine was accomplished by attaching small tufts of nylon on them and videotaping the flow patterns revealed during flight. A surrogate experimental engine shape, called the cone tube, was flown attached to the force balance on the PFTF. The cone tube emulated the dimensional and mass properties of the maximum design load the PFTF can carry. As the F-15B put the PFTF and the attached cone tube through its paces, accurate data was garnered, allowing engineers to fully verify PFTF and force balance capabilities in real flight conditions. When the first actual experimental engine is ready to fly on the F-15B/PFTF, engineers will have full confidence and knowledge of what they can accomplish with this "flying engine test stand."
NASA's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft recently flew in the supersonic shock wave of a U.S. Navy F-5E in support of the F-5 Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) project, part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Quiet Supersonic Platform (QSP) program. The flights originated from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. Four flights were flown in order to measure the F-5E's near-field (close-up) sonic boom signature at Mach 1.4, during which more than 50 shockwave patterns were measured at distances as close as 100 feet below the F-5E.
NASA's F-15B Research T...
February 13, 2002
 
Description NASA's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft recently flew in the supersonic shock wave of a U.S. Navy F-5E in support of the F-5 Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) project, part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Quiet Supersonic Platform (QSP) program. The flights originated from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. Four flights were flown in order to measure the F-5E's near-field (close-up) sonic boom signature at Mach 1.4, during which more than 50 shockwave patterns were measured at distances as close as 100 feet below the F-5E.
NASA's F-15B (upper right), later used for aerodynamic flight research, is seen here with the F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft, on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Currently being flown by Dryden in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the F/A-18B has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, air data sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 reusable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on the Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
F-15B and F-18 SRA in f...
July 10, 1993
 
Description NASA's F-15B (upper right), later used for aerodynamic flight research, is seen here with the F/A-18B Systems Research Aircraft, on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Currently being flown by Dryden in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the F/A-18B has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, air data sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 reusable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on the Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
13 Nov 1995
 
Description This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).
The F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles) in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, Sept. 18, 1995. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of the thrust vectoring nozzles seen here, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
F-15B ACTIVE showing th...
September 18, 1995
 
Description The F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles) in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, Sept. 18, 1995. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of the thrust vectoring nozzles seen here, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept involving two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could lead to significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
13 Nov 1995
 
Description This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept involving two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could lead to significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
Operational checks of the flight control and instrumentation systems on the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles), are seen here being conducted Sept. 18, 1995, in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of thrust vectoring nozzles, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
F-15B ACTIVE in hangar
September 18, 1995
 
Description Operational checks of the flight control and instrumentation systems on the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles), are seen here being conducted Sept. 18, 1995, in a test bay in the Integrated Test Facility (ITF) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. A key feature of the ACTIVE research project is the evaluation of thrust vectoring nozzles, developed by Pratt and Whitney, that could enhance high-angle of attack control and maneuverability on future aircraft.
This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
F-15B ACTIVE test stand
13 Nov 1995
 
Description This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.
NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
F-15B ACTIVE with thrus...
March 1996
 
Description NASA Pilot Jim Smolka and McDonnell Douglas Pilot Larry Walker fly the F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Intergrated Vehicles) program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust-vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds. NASA pilot Rogers Smith and photographer Carla Thomas fly the F-18 chase to accompany the flight.
F-15B on ramp showing c...
December 1, 1999
 
F-15B in flight showing...
December 3, 1999
 
NASA F-15B #836 landing...
NASA F-15B #836 landing...
October 3, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
September 27, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
October 3, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
October 3, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
September 27, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
September 27, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
September 27, 2006
 
Group photo following t...
Group photo following t...
October 20, 2006
 
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
NASA F-15B #836 in flig...
September 25, 2006
 
NASA's highly modified F-15, being used for digital electronic flight and engine control systems research, is seen here on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on a Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
F-15B in flight from be...
July 10, 1993
 
Description NASA's highly modified F-15, being used for digital electronic flight and engine control systems research, is seen here on a flight from the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. NASA's F-15B aircraft is being used by Dryden as an aerospace research aircraft. Certain experiments can be placed on a Flight Test Fixture, which is mounted under the fuselage. The research projects can then be subjected to different aerodynamic loads, speeds and temperatures. The F-15B, No. 836, was acquired in 1993 and is also used at Dryden as a research support aircraft.
This view from a NASA D...
This view from a NASA D...
December 6, 2002
 
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
August 27, 2003
 
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
August 27, 2003
 
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
NASA Dryden's highly mo...
March 3, 2003
 
F-15 ACTIVE (NASA 837) ...
The F-15B ACTIVE (NASA ...
Nov 1996
 
NASA Dryden's F-15B testbed aircraft flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of sonic shockwave development as air passes over an airfoil. The shock location sensor developed by TAO Systems, Hampton, Virginia, utilizes a multi-element hot-film sensor array along with a constant-voltage anemometer and special diagnostic software to pinpoint the exact location of the shock wave and its characteristics as it passes over an aircraft surface. For this experiment, the 45-element sensor was mounted on a Dryden-designed airfoil which was attached to the right side of the underbelly Flight Test Fixture on the F-15B. Tests were flown at transonic speeds of Mach 0.7 to 0.9, and the device isolated the location of the shock wave to within a half-inch. Project officials said that closer spacing of the sensors and underlying pressure orifices would result in even more precise location of shockwave development.
F-15B testbed in flight...
Dec 1996
 
Description NASA Dryden's F-15B testbed aircraft flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of sonic shockwave development as air passes over an airfoil. The shock location sensor developed by TAO Systems, Hampton, Virginia, utilizes a multi-element hot-film sensor array along with a constant-voltage anemometer and special diagnostic software to pinpoint the exact location of the shock wave and its characteristics as it passes over an aircraft surface. For this experiment, the 45-element sensor was mounted on a Dryden-designed airfoil which was attached to the right side of the underbelly Flight Test Fixture on the F-15B. Tests were flown at transonic speeds of Mach 0.7 to 0.9, and the device isolated the location of the shock wave to within a half-inch. Project officials said that closer spacing of the sensors and underlying pressure orifices would result in even more precise location of shockwave development.
An experimental device to pinpoint the location of a shockwave that develops in an aircraft flying at transonic and supersonic speeds was recently flight-tested at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The shock location sensor, developed by TAO Systems, Hampton, Va., utilizes a multi-element hot-film sensor array along with a constant-voltage anemometer and special diagnostic software to pinpoint the exact location of the shockwave and its characteristics as it develops on an aircraft surface. For this experiment, the 45-element sensor was mounted on the small Dryden-designed airfoil shown in this illustration. The airfoil was attached to the Flight Test Fixture mounted underneath the fuselage of Dryden's F-15B testbed aircraft. Tests were flown at transonic speeds of Mach 0.7 to 0.9, and the device isolated the location of the shock wave to within a half-inch. Application of this technology could assist designers of future supersonic aircraft in improving the efficiency of engine air inlets by controlling the shockwave, with a related improvement in aircraft performance and fuel economy.
New sonic shockwave mul...
Dec 1996
 
Description An experimental device to pinpoint the location of a shockwave that develops in an aircraft flying at transonic and supersonic speeds was recently flight-tested at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The shock location sensor, developed by TAO Systems, Hampton, Va., utilizes a multi-element hot-film sensor array along with a constant-voltage anemometer and special diagnostic software to pinpoint the exact location of the shockwave and its characteristics as it develops on an aircraft surface. For this experiment, the 45-element sensor was mounted on the small Dryden-designed airfoil shown in this illustration. The airfoil was attached to the Flight Test Fixture mounted underneath the fuselage of Dryden's F-15B testbed aircraft. Tests were flown at transonic speeds of Mach 0.7 to 0.9, and the device isolated the location of the shock wave to within a half-inch. Application of this technology could assist designers of future supersonic aircraft in improving the efficiency of engine air inlets by controlling the shockwave, with a related improvement in aircraft performance and fuel economy.
NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying a modified McDonnell-Douglas F-15B aircraft as a testbed for a variety of transonic flight experiments. The two-seat aircraft, bearing NASA tail number 836, is shown during a recent flight over the high desert carrying a Drdyen-designed Flight Test Fixture (FTF) upon which aerodynamic experiments are mounted. The FTF is a heavily instrumented fin-like structure which is mounted on the F-15B's underbelly in place of the standard external fuel tank. Since being aquired by NASA in 1993, the aircraft has been modified to include video recording, telemetry and data recording capabilities. The twin-engine aircraft flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of sonic shockwave development as air passes over an airfoil. The F-15B is currently being prepared for the Boundary Layer Heat Experiment, which will explore the potential drag reduction from heating the turbulent portion of the air that passes over the fuselage of a large aircraft.
F-15B transonic flight ...
January 17, 1996
 
Description NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying a modified McDonnell-Douglas F-15B aircraft as a testbed for a variety of transonic flight experiments. The two-seat aircraft, bearing NASA tail number 836, is shown during a recent flight over the high desert carrying a Drdyen-designed Flight Test Fixture (FTF) upon which aerodynamic experiments are mounted. The FTF is a heavily instrumented fin-like structure which is mounted on the F-15B's underbelly in place of the standard external fuel tank. Since being aquired by NASA in 1993, the aircraft has been modified to include video recording, telemetry and data recording capabilities. The twin-engine aircraft flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of sonic shockwave development as air passes over an airfoil. The F-15B is currently being prepared for the Boundary Layer Heat Experiment, which will explore the potential drag reduction from heating the turbulent portion of the air that passes over the fuselage of a large aircraft.
NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using a modified McDonnell-Douglas F-15B aircraft as a testbed for a variety of transonic flight experiments. The twin-engine, twin-tail aircraft is shown carrying a Dryden-designed Flight Test Fixture (FTF) upon which aerodynamic experiments are mounted. The F-15B flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of of sonic shock wave development as air passes over an airfoil. The F-15B is currently being prepared for the Boundary Layer Heat Experiment, which will explore potential aerodynamic drag reduction from heating the turbulent portion of the air flow that passes over the fuselage of a large aircraft. The experiment also will measure the amount of electrical power required to achieve the expected heat-induced reduction in aerodynamic drag. Six thin electric resistance heaters well be mounted in the FTF, and both unheated and heated temperatures as well as surface air pressures will be measured.
F-15B transonic flight ...
January 17, 1996
 
Description NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using a modified McDonnell-Douglas F-15B aircraft as a testbed for a variety of transonic flight experiments. The twin-engine, twin-tail aircraft is shown carrying a Dryden-designed Flight Test Fixture (FTF) upon which aerodynamic experiments are mounted. The F-15B flew several flights recently in support of an experiment to determine the precise location of of sonic shock wave development as air passes over an airfoil. The F-15B is currently being prepared for the Boundary Layer Heat Experiment, which will explore potential aerodynamic drag reduction from heating the turbulent portion of the air flow that passes over the fuselage of a large aircraft. The experiment also will measure the amount of electrical power required to achieve the expected heat-induced reduction in aerodynamic drag. Six thin electric resistance heaters well be mounted in the FTF, and both unheated and heated temperatures as well as surface air pressures will be measured.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered wit...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Close-up of test panels...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Close-up of test panels...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
F-15B in on ramp with c...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Close-up of test panels...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
Test panels covered wit...
January 12, 1999
 
Description Test panels covered with an advanced foam insulation material for the Space Shuttle's giant external fuel tank were test flown aboard an F-15B research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Six panels were mounted on the left side of a heavily instrumented Flight Text Fixture mounted underneath the F-15B's fuselage. Insulation on this panel was finely machined over a horizontal rib structure to simulate in-line airflow past the tank; other panels had the ribs mounted vertically or had the insulation left in a rough as-sprayed surface. The tests were part of an effort by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to determine why small particles of the new insulation flaked off the tank on recent Shuttle missions. The tests with Dryden's F-15B were designed to replicate the pressure environment the Shuttle encounters during the first minute after launch. No noticeable erosion of the insulation material was noted after the flight experiment at Dryden.
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