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F-18 cockpit and instru...
1995
 
A glycol-based liquid, released through very small holes around the nose of an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program, aids researchers in flow visualization studies. This photograph, taken postflight, shows the airflow pattern at 26 degrees angle of attack. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
F-18 HARV forebody surf...
September 28, 1988
 
Description A glycol-based liquid, released through very small holes around the nose of an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program, aids researchers in flow visualization studies. This photograph, taken postflight, shows the airflow pattern at 26 degrees angle of attack. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
Flow visualization smoke marks vortex flows along the leading edge extension on an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program. The aircraft is at a high angle of attack in this photo. The aircraft was modified with a thrust vectoring system to further investigate high angle of attack flying. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
F-18 HARV smoke and tuf...
April 14, 1989
 
Description Flow visualization smoke marks vortex flows along the leading edge extension on an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program. The aircraft is at a high angle of attack in this photo. The aircraft was modified with a thrust vectoring system to further investigate high angle of attack flying. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
Smoke generators and yarn tufts are used for flow visualization studies on an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in its High Angle of Attack research Vehicle (HARV) program. The aircraft is at about 30 degrees angle of attack in this photo. The aircraft was modified with a thrust vectoring system to further investigate high angle of attack flying. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
F-18 HARV smoke and tuf...
April 14, 1989
 
Description Smoke generators and yarn tufts are used for flow visualization studies on an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in its High Angle of Attack research Vehicle (HARV) program. The aircraft is at about 30 degrees angle of attack in this photo. The aircraft was modified with a thrust vectoring system to further investigate high angle of attack flying. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.
The modified F-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for high angle of attack research cruises over the nearby desert. A thrust vectoring system, linked to the aircraft's flight control system, was installed on each of the engine exhaust nozzles. The system moves a set of three paddles on each engine to redirect thrust for directional control and increased maneuverability at angles of attack at up to 70 degrees. Data from the F-18 high angle of attack program produced information to validate computer codes and wind tunnel results and led to design methods providing better performance in future aircraft.
F-18 HARV in flight
September 13, 1991
 
Description The modified F-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for high angle of attack research cruises over the nearby desert. A thrust vectoring system, linked to the aircraft's flight control system, was installed on each of the engine exhaust nozzles. The system moves a set of three paddles on each engine to redirect thrust for directional control and increased maneuverability at angles of attack at up to 70 degrees. Data from the F-18 high angle of attack program produced information to validate computer codes and wind tunnel results and led to design methods providing better performance in future aircraft.
Ed Schneider, (left), is the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle of Attack program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1983. In addition to his assignment with the F-18 High Angle of Attack program, Schneider is a project pilot for the F-15B aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA NB-52B launch aircraft, and the SR-71 "Blackbird" aircraft. He is a Fellow and was the 1994 President of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. Schneider is seen here with Fitzhugh L. Fulton Jr., (right), who was a civilian research pilot at Dryden. from August 1, 1966, until July 3, 1986, following 23 years of service as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force. Fulton was the project pilot on all early tests of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) used to air launch the Space Shuttle prototype Enterprise in the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden in l977. For his work in the ALT program, Fulton received NASA's Exceptional Service Medal. He also received the Exceptional Service Medal again in 1983 for flying the 747 SCA during the European tour of the Space Shuttle Enterprise. During his career at Dryden, Fulton was project pilot on NASA's NB-52B launch aircraft used to air launch a variety of piloted and unpiloted research aircraft, including the X-15s and lifting bodies. He flew the XB-70 prototype supersonic bomber on both NASA-USAF tests and NASA research flights during the late 1960s, attaining speeds exceeding Mach 3. He was also a project pilot on the YF-12A and YF-12C research program from April 14, 1969, until September 25, 1978. The F/A-18 Hornet seen behind them is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. As support aircraft, the F-18's are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. As a safety chase aircraft, F-18's, flown by research pilots, accompany research missions as another ?set of eyes? to visually observe the research event, experiment or test to help make sure the flights are carried out safely. The ?chase? pilots are in constant communication with the research pilots and mission control to report abnormalities that may be seen from the support aircraft. Pilots must also stay proficient by flying a certain number of missions per month. F-18's are used for this. A two-seat support aircraft is also used when research missions require an engineer or photographer on the flights.
F-18 chase craft with N...
January 8, 1992
 
Description Ed Schneider, (left), is the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle of Attack program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. He has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1983. In addition to his assignment with the F-18 High Angle of Attack program, Schneider is a project pilot for the F-15B aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA NB-52B launch aircraft, and the SR-71 "Blackbird" aircraft. He is a Fellow and was the 1994 President of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. Schneider is seen here with Fitzhugh L. Fulton Jr., (right), who was a civilian research pilot at Dryden. from August 1, 1966, until July 3, 1986, following 23 years of service as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force. Fulton was the project pilot on all early tests of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) used to air launch the Space Shuttle prototype Enterprise in the Approach and Landing Tests (ALT) at Dryden in l977. For his work in the ALT program, Fulton received NASA's Exceptional Service Medal. He also received the Exceptional Service Medal again in 1983 for flying the 747 SCA during the European tour of the Space Shuttle Enterprise. During his career at Dryden, Fulton was project pilot on NASA's NB-52B launch aircraft used to air launch a variety of piloted and unpiloted research aircraft, including the X-15s and lifting bodies. He flew the XB-70 prototype supersonic bomber on both NASA-USAF tests and NASA research flights during the late 1960s, attaining speeds exceeding Mach 3. He was also a project pilot on the YF-12A and YF-12C research program from April 14, 1969, until September 25, 1978. The F/A-18 Hornet seen behind them is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. As support aircraft, the F-18's are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. As a safety chase aircraft, F-18's, flown by research pilots, accompany research missions as another ?set of eyes? to visually observe the research event, experiment or test to help make sure the flights are carried out safely. The ?chase? pilots are in constant communication with the research pilots and mission control to report abnormalities that may be seen from the support aircraft. Pilots must also stay proficient by flying a certain number of missions per month. F-18's are used for this. A two-seat support aircraft is also used when research missions require an engineer or photographer on the flights.
NASA's F/A-18 Hornet is seen here in a banked turn over Rogers Dry Lake in the Mojave desert on an early research flight. Currently being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the former Navy fighter has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, airdata sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 resuable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs.
F-18 SRA in banked flig...
July 12, 1993
 
Description NASA's F/A-18 Hornet is seen here in a banked turn over Rogers Dry Lake in the Mojave desert on an early research flight. Currently being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program, the former Navy fighter has been modified into a unique Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to investigate a host of new technologies in the areas of flight controls, airdata sensing and advanced computing. One of the more than 20 experiments being tested aboard the SRA F-18 is an advanced air data sensing system which uses a group of pressure taps flush-mounted on the forward fuselage to measure both altitude and wind speed and direction--critical data for flight control and research investigations. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system concept is being evaluated for possible use on the X-33 and X-34 resuable space-launch vehicles. The primary goal of the SRA program is to validate through flight research cutting-edge technologies which could benefit future aircraft and spacecraft by improving efficiency and performance, reducing weight and complexity, with a resultant reduction on development and operational costs.
Pressure transducers are located in the tiny holes visible on the engine inlet lip of NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The sensors in this photo are located on the outboard side of the inlet duct entrance and measure pressure distortions during flight. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights at the Dryden Flight Research Center in Southern California, over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
F-18 HARV instrumentati...
October 15, 1993
 
Description Pressure transducers are located in the tiny holes visible on the engine inlet lip of NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The sensors in this photo are located on the outboard side of the inlet duct entrance and measure pressure distortions during flight. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights at the Dryden Flight Research Center in Southern California, over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, on an early research flight over Rogers Dry Lake. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for postion measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, "smart" skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.
F-18 SRA in flight over...
July 12, 1993
 
Description The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA), a highly modified F-18 jet fighter, on an early research flight over Rogers Dry Lake. The former Navy aircraft is being flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to evaluate a number of experimental aerospace technologies in a multi-year, joint NASA/DOD/industry program. Among the more than 20 experiments being flight-tested were several involving fiber optic sensor systems. Experiments developed by McDonnell-Douglas and Lockheed-Martin centered on installation and maintenace techniques for various types of fiber-optic hardware proposed for use in military and commercial aircraft, while a Parker-Hannifin experiment focused in alternative fiber-optic designs for postion measurement sensors as well as operational experience in handling optical sensor systems. Other experiments being flown on this testbed aircraft include electronically-controlled control surface actuators, flush air data collection systems, "smart" skin antennae and laser-based systems. Incorporation of one or more of these technologies in future aircraft and spacecraft could result in signifigant savings in weight, maintenance and overall cost.
The specially equipped and instrumented F/A-18 research aircraft that was used in NASA's High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program banks high over snow-capped mountains near the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. The aircraft was equipped with a colored dye fluid system which emits dye from ports in the nose to record surface flow at various angles of attack. It was also equipped with a smoke generating system to visualize flow fields developing at the forward portion of the aircraft. Onboard cameras located in the vertical tips recorded the flow. The HARV program compiled a database for designers of future aircraft to create high performance aircraft that are safer and more controllable in high angle of attack flight, capable of supermaneuvers and that avoid post production design changes.
F-18 HARV in banked fli...
March 15, 1994
 
Description The specially equipped and instrumented F/A-18 research aircraft that was used in NASA's High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program banks high over snow-capped mountains near the Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. The aircraft was equipped with a colored dye fluid system which emits dye from ports in the nose to record surface flow at various angles of attack. It was also equipped with a smoke generating system to visualize flow fields developing at the forward portion of the aircraft. Onboard cameras located in the vertical tips recorded the flow. The HARV program compiled a database for designers of future aircraft to create high performance aircraft that are safer and more controllable in high angle of attack flight, capable of supermaneuvers and that avoid post production design changes.
NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this early-model F-18 Hornet as a flying research platform to evaluate a number of emerging technologies in aircraft control and information systems. The Systems Research Aircraft, a pre-production two-seat version of the twin-engine tactical fighter aircraft, has been extensively modified for its research role. Among projects flown on the plane are experiments to evaluate fiber optics for flight-critical control systems, advanced air data acquisition systems, and electrically-powered flight control actuators which do not require connection to the aircraft central hydraulic system. The new technologies could lead to lighter and more efficient aircraft designs with higher performance and greater safety.
F-18 SRA in flight from...
Feb 1995
 
Description NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this early-model F-18 Hornet as a flying research platform to evaluate a number of emerging technologies in aircraft control and information systems. The Systems Research Aircraft, a pre-production two-seat version of the twin-engine tactical fighter aircraft, has been extensively modified for its research role. Among projects flown on the plane are experiments to evaluate fiber optics for flight-critical control systems, advanced air data acquisition systems, and electrically-powered flight control actuators which do not require connection to the aircraft central hydraulic system. The new technologies could lead to lighter and more efficient aircraft designs with higher performance and greater safety.
NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the third and final phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. A set of control surfaces called strakes were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, provided improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.
F-18 HARV in flight wit...
Aug 1995
 
Description NASA's F-18 from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, soars over the Mojave Desert while flying the third and final phase of the HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) program. A set of control surfaces called strakes were installed in the nose of the aircraft. The strakes, outlined in gold and white, provided improved yaw control at steep angles of attack. Normally folded flush, the units -- four feet long and six inches wide -- can be opened independently to interact with the nose vortices to produce large side forces for control. Testing involved evaluation of the strakes by themselves as well as combined with the aircraft's Thrust Vectoring System. The strakes were designed by NASA's Langley Research Center, then installed and flight tested at Dryden.
A thrust vectoring system can be seen mounted on the aft end of this NASA F-18 research aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during an inflight refueling stop with a KC-135A (Serial #55-3135) tanker. The system was used to enhance its maneuverability and control at high angles of attack (high alpha) when conventional aerodynamic controls ? ailerons, rudders, and elevators ? are ineffective. The system features three spoon-shaped paddles mounted around the exhaust nozzles of each engine. The system, linked to the aircraft?s flight control system, moves the paddles into the exhaust flow to redirect thrust for directional control and increased maneuverability at angles of attack near 70 degrees. First research flights with the system operating began during the spring of 1991. Data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program produced information to validate computer codes and wind tunnel results and led to design methods providing better performance in future aircraft.
F-18 HARV in flight ref...
Nov 1995
 
Description A thrust vectoring system can be seen mounted on the aft end of this NASA F-18 research aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during an inflight refueling stop with a KC-135A (Serial #55-3135) tanker. The system was used to enhance its maneuverability and control at high angles of attack (high alpha) when conventional aerodynamic controls ? ailerons, rudders, and elevators ? are ineffective. The system features three spoon-shaped paddles mounted around the exhaust nozzles of each engine. The system, linked to the aircraft?s flight control system, moves the paddles into the exhaust flow to redirect thrust for directional control and increased maneuverability at angles of attack near 70 degrees. First research flights with the system operating began during the spring of 1991. Data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program produced information to validate computer codes and wind tunnel results and led to design methods providing better performance in future aircraft.
The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
F-18 HARV final flight ...
29 May 1996
 
Description The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
F-18 HARV final flight ...
29 May 1996
 
Description The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.
A highly-modified F-18 Hornet being flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center in a joint NASA/DOD/industry research program touches down on the main runway at Edwards Air Force Base following another research flight. The two-seat "B" model F-18, formerly a support aircraft at DFRC, has been converted into a Sytems Research Aircraft (SRA) to flight test a variety of experimental components and sub-sytems. Among the more than 20 experiments is the Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration, or "ALADIN," scheduled to begin flight tests this fall. Similiar to a standard pitot tube, the fuselage-mounted ALADIN probe measures and integrates Mach speed, altitude, angle of attack and side-slip angle. The experiment also incorporates a neural network computer which will be "trained" to compute air data measured by the probe.
F-18 SRA landing
May 1996
 
Description A highly-modified F-18 Hornet being flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center in a joint NASA/DOD/industry research program touches down on the main runway at Edwards Air Force Base following another research flight. The two-seat "B" model F-18, formerly a support aircraft at DFRC, has been converted into a Sytems Research Aircraft (SRA) to flight test a variety of experimental components and sub-sytems. Among the more than 20 experiments is the Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration, or "ALADIN," scheduled to begin flight tests this fall. Similiar to a standard pitot tube, the fuselage-mounted ALADIN probe measures and integrates Mach speed, altitude, angle of attack and side-slip angle. The experiment also incorporates a neural network computer which will be "trained" to compute air data measured by the probe.
Under the watchful eyes of news media and officials of the city of Lancaster, California, from a balcony, workers steady an F/A-18 Hornet airframe as it is gently lifted into the air prior to mounting on a pedestal in front of "The Hangar," the city's municipal stadium. The F/A-18 was formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as a safety chase and support aircraft prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on a 28-foot-tall pedestal on front of the stadium. The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description Under the watchful eyes of news media and officials of the city of Lancaster, California, from a balcony, workers steady an F/A-18 Hornet airframe as it is gently lifted into the air prior to mounting on a pedestal in front of "The Hangar," the city's municipal stadium. The F/A-18 was formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as a safety chase and support aircraft prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on a 28-foot-tall pedestal on front of the stadium. The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
The small numbers on the nose of this F-18 aircraft at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It incorporates flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give pilots more accurate information than standard systems employing external probes can provide. Developed by Dryden researchers in cooperation with Honeywell?s Research and Technology Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, the system was flight tested on Dryden?s Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) last year, and is now being used as a precise reference for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the modified F-18.
F-18 SRA closeup of nos...
Mar 1997
 
Description The small numbers on the nose of this F-18 aircraft at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It incorporates flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give pilots more accurate information than standard systems employing external probes can provide. Developed by Dryden researchers in cooperation with Honeywell?s Research and Technology Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, the system was flight tested on Dryden?s Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) last year, and is now being used as a precise reference for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the modified F-18.
Workers carefully align a mounting bracket attached to an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft with the top of a pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The Blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft, formerly flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was loaned to the city for display following its recent retirement. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description Workers carefully align a mounting bracket attached to an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft with the top of a pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The Blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft, formerly flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was loaned to the city for display following its recent retirement. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
An F/A-18 Hornet aircraft formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is sandwiched between two groups of workers as they mount it atop a pedestal at the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. NASA Dryden had flown the blue-and-white twin-jet as a safety chase and support aircraft for about nine years prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now in loan to the city for public display. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description An F/A-18 Hornet aircraft formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is sandwiched between two groups of workers as they mount it atop a pedestal at the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. NASA Dryden had flown the blue-and-white twin-jet as a safety chase and support aircraft for about nine years prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now in loan to the city for public display. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
An F/A-18 aircraft formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is lifted by crane towards what has become its new home - a pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The F/A-18 had been flown by NASA Dryden as a safety chase aircraft on research missions and for various other pilot proficiency and support duties prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on the 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the stadium, appropriately named "The Hangar." The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description An F/A-18 aircraft formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is lifted by crane towards what has become its new home - a pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The F/A-18 had been flown by NASA Dryden as a safety chase aircraft on research missions and for various other pilot proficiency and support duties prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on the 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the stadium, appropriately named "The Hangar." The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
While workers on the ground steady the craft with guy ropes, workers atop a high-lift truck align the mounting plates as an F/A-18 Hornet airplane formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is mounted on a 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The aircraft was loaned to the city for pulbic display after its recent retirement by Dryden, which is located at nearby Edwards, California. The blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft was flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA Dryden for about nine years before being retired. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description While workers on the ground steady the craft with guy ropes, workers atop a high-lift truck align the mounting plates as an F/A-18 Hornet airplane formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is mounted on a 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The aircraft was loaned to the city for pulbic display after its recent retirement by Dryden, which is located at nearby Edwards, California. The blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft was flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA Dryden for about nine years before being retired. Known as "The Hangar," the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
As news media and city officials watch from the balcony of the city baseball stadium in Lancaster, California, a crane gently positions an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft for mounting on a steel pedestal. The F/A-18 was recently retired by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after being flown as a safety chase and support aircraft over the past nine years. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on the 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the Lancaster Municipal Stadium, know as "The Hangar." The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description As news media and city officials watch from the balcony of the city baseball stadium in Lancaster, California, a crane gently positions an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft for mounting on a steel pedestal. The F/A-18 was recently retired by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, after being flown as a safety chase and support aircraft over the past nine years. The aircraft is now mounted nose skyward on the 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the Lancaster Municipal Stadium, know as "The Hangar." The stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.
F-18 SRA closeup of nos...
Apr 1997
 
Description This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.
A large crane gingerly lowers an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft onto a 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The blue-and-white F/A-18 was recently loaned to the city by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. NASA Dryden had flown the twin-jet aircraft as a safety chase and support aircraft over the past nine years. The stadium, known as "The Hangar," is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Retired NASA F-18 being...
Mar 1997
 
Description A large crane gingerly lowers an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft onto a 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The blue-and-white F/A-18 was recently loaned to the city by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. NASA Dryden had flown the twin-jet aircraft as a safety chase and support aircraft over the past nine years. The stadium, known as "The Hangar," is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.
Small numbers on the nose cap of this F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes, which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It differs from those systems by incorporating flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give the pilot more accurate information than systems employing external probes provide. Stephen A. Whitmore of Dryden?s Aerodynamics Branch won NASA?s Space Act Award for his development of the Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system. The award honors projects which are scientifically or technologically significant to the aeronautics and space community. The system was flight tested on the modified F-18 last year, and is now being used as a precise reference system for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the aircraft.
F-18 SRA closeup of nos...
Mar 1997
 
Description Small numbers on the nose cap of this F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, show the locations of 11 tiny holes, which are an integral part of a new air data system installed on the aircraft. The Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system measures the speed and direction of the airflow past the aircraft and its altitude, similar to standard air data systems. It differs from those systems by incorporating flush-mounted pressure taps, miniature transducers and an advanced research computer to give the pilot more accurate information than systems employing external probes provide. Stephen A. Whitmore of Dryden?s Aerodynamics Branch won NASA?s Space Act Award for his development of the Real-Time Flush Air Data Sensing system. The award honors projects which are scientifically or technologically significant to the aeronautics and space community. The system was flight tested on the modified F-18 last year, and is now being used as a precise reference system for other air data systems currently being evaluated on the aircraft.
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