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Browse All : National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA)

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Final Meeting of NACA
Final Meeting of NACA
VIPs-People at NASA-NAC...
08/21/1958
NASA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA's 9th Annual Aircraft Engineering Research Conference
NACA's 9th Annual Aircr...
NACA-LaRC
05/23/1934
NASA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Model of Ramjet with Abe Silverstein
NACA Model of Ramjet wi...
Aircraft Propulsion
06/26/1945
GRC
 
NASA Center
Glenn Research Center
NACA Physicist Studying Alpha Rays
NACA Physicist Studying...
Aircraft Propulsion
09/12/1957
Bill Bowles
 
NASA Center
Glenn Research Center
The NACA Test Force
The NACA Test Force
Top 20 Dryden Aircraft
01/01/1952
NACA
 
NASA Center
Dryden Flight Research Center
NACA Cowling #10
NACA Cowling #10
NACA-LaRC
09/01/1928
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
NACA Lewis Softball Team 1952
NACA Lewis Softball Tea...
NACA-GRC-LRC
01/01/1961
NACA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Drafting Room
NACA Drafting Room
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1961
NACA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Physics Laboratory
NACA Physics Laboratory
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1961
NACA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Tunnel #1
NACA Tunnel #1
NACA-LaRC
5/22/1921
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
NACA Langley Administrative Office
NACA Langley Administra...
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1927
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
Curtiss Hawk with NACA Cowling
Curtiss Hawk with NACA ...
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1928
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
Curtiss AT-5a NACA Cowling
Curtiss AT-5a NACA Cowl...
NACA-LaRC
10/12/1928
Unknown
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
Original NACA Hangars
Original NACA Hangars
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1931
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
Submarine in Full Scale Tunnel at NACA Langley
Submarine in Full Scale...
NACA-LaRC
1/1/1958
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
NACA Langley High Speed Tunnel
NACA Langley High Speed...
NACA-LaRC
01/01/1936
NACA
 
NASA Center
Langley Research Center
NACA Standard Insignia
NACA Standard Insignia
NACA-ARC
04/24/1941
NACA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Seal
NACA Seal
NACA-ARC
01/01/1961
NASA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
Members of NACA
Members of NACA
NASA Management
04/18/1929
NASA
 
NASA Center
Headquarters
NACA Ames 16 Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel
NACA Ames 16 Foot High ...
Flight Research at ARC
04/01/1948
NACA
 
NASA Center
Ames Research Center
P-80 Model Mounted on Wing of a NACA P-51B
P-80 Model Mounted on W...
Flight Research at ARC
06/01/1948
NACA
 
NASA Center
Ames Research Center
NACA Ames 7x10 Wind Tunnel
NACA Ames 7x10 Wind Tun...
NACA-ARC
04/01/1942
NACA
 
NASA Center
Ames Research Center
First Meeting of the NACA 1915
First Meeting of the NA...
[NACA-ARC, NASA Managem...
04/23/1915
NACA
 
NASA Center
Ames Research Center
In 1954 this photo of two swept wing airplanes was taken on the ramp of NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station. The Douglas D-558-ll is a research aircraft while the Boeing B-47A Stratojet is a production bomber and very different in size. Both contributed to the studies for swept back wing research.
NACA Aircraft Fleet on ...
October 26, 1954
 
Description
In 1954 this photo of two swept wing airplanes was taken on the ramp of NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station. The Douglas D-558-ll is a research aircraft while the Boeing B-47A Stratojet is a production bomber and very different in size. Both contributed to the studies for swept back wing research.
Stanley P. Butchart joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics? High-Speed Flight Research Station on May 10, 1951. Stan was the fourth research pilot hired at the Station affording him the opportunity to fly the early research aircraft. Stan began a flying career while attending Junior College. He received primary and secondary civilian pilot training, enlisting in the U.S. Navy in July 1942. Stan took his Navy air training at Corpus Christi, Texas. Upon completion of training he was assigned to a torpedo-bomber Air Group, VT-51, flying Grumman-General Motors TBM Avenger, a torpedo-bomber, from the carrier San Jacinto in the South Pacific. When World War II ended, Stan was released from active duty as a Navy Lieutenant, with a Distinguished Flying Cross and a Presidential Unit Citation among his service medals. Butchart elected to stay in the Naval Reserve group and flew for an additional 5 years while he attended the University of Washington. By 1950, Stan had earned bachelor degrees in aeronautical engineering and mechanical engineering. After graduation he went to work for Boeing Aircraft as a junior design engineer and was assigned to the B-47 body group. In May 1951, he arrived at the NACA facility to start a career as a research pilot. Stan flew the Douglas D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951), the Douglas D-558-II #3 (2 pilot check-out flights, first on June 26, 1953), Northrop X-4 (4 flights, first on May 27, 1952), Bell X-5 (13 flights, first in early December 1952). Other aircraft flown on research projects were the Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, Convair CV-990, Boeing B-52-003, Boeing B-747, North American F-100A, Convair F-102, Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, General Dynamics F-111, Boeing B-720, Convair CV-880, and the Boeing B-47 Stratojet, his favorite. he also flew many other aircraft. Stan did nearly all of the big airplane work at the Center. The biggest work load was flying the Boeing B-29 Stratofortress (Navy designation: P2B). At this time the pilot of the aircraft was the one in charge. It was the pilot who called for the chase planes before drop time, then for the fire trucks to be in position, and he counted down for the launch of the experimental aircraft after making sure everything and everyone was ?ready.? The P2B was used in the launching of the D-558s while the B-29 carried the X-1s to altitude for drops. Stan was pilot of the P2B for 1 drop of the D-558-II #1 (1951 - 1954), 63 drops of the D-558-II #2 (1951 - 1956), and 38 drops of the D-558-II #3 (1951 - 1956). As pilot of the B-29 Stan flew for 1 drop of the Bell X-1A (1955), 13 drops of the Bell X-1B (1956-1958) and 22 drops of the X-1E (1955 - 1958). During the lifting body tow tests Stan was pilot of the R4D that towed the M2-F1 to altitude for release. He made 14 tows in 1966. On June 13, 1966, Stanley P. Butchart became the Chief Pilot at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations? Flight Research Center and a few weeks
NACA/NASA test pilot St...
1954
 
Description
Stanley P. Butchart joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics? High-Speed Flight Research Station on May 10, 1951. Stan was the fourth research pilot hired at the Station affording him the opportunity to fly the early research aircraft. Stan began a flying career while attending Junior College. He received primary and secondary civilian pilot training, enlisting in the U.S. Navy in July 1942. Stan took his Navy air training at Corpus Christi, Texas. Upon completion of training he was assigned to a torpedo-bomber Air Group, VT-51, flying Grumman-General Motors TBM Avenger, a torpedo-bomber, from the carrier San Jacinto in the South Pacific. When World War II ended, Stan was released from active duty as a Navy Lieutenant, with a Distinguished Flying Cross and a Presidential Unit Citation among his service medals. Butchart elected to stay in the Naval Reserve group and flew for an additional 5 years while he attended the University of Washington. By 1950, Stan had earned bachelor degrees in aeronautical engineering and mechanical engineering. After graduation he went to work for Boeing Aircraft as a junior design engineer and was assigned to the B-47 body group. In May 1951, he arrived at the NACA facility to start a career as a research pilot. Stan flew the Douglas D-558-I #3 (12 flights, first on October 19, 1951), the Douglas D-558-II #3 (2 pilot check-out flights, first on June 26, 1953), Northrop X-4 (4 flights, first on May 27, 1952), Bell X-5 (13 flights, first in early December 1952). Other aircraft flown on research projects were the Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, Convair CV-990, Boeing B-52-003, Boeing B-747, North American F-100A, Convair F-102, Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, General Dynamics F-111, Boeing B-720, Convair CV-880, and the Boeing B-47 Stratojet, his favorite. he also flew many other aircraft. Stan did nearly all of the big airplane work at the Center. The biggest work load was flying the Boeing B-29 Stratofortress (Navy designation: P2B). At this time the pilot of the aircraft was the one in charge. It was the pilot who called for the chase planes before drop time, then for the fire trucks to be in position, and he counted down for the launch of the experimental aircraft after making sure everything and everyone was ?ready.? The P2B was used in the launching of the D-558s while the B-29 carried the X-1s to altitude for drops. Stan was pilot of the P2B for 1 drop of the D-558-II #1 (1951 - 1954), 63 drops of the D-558-II #2 (1951 - 1956), and 38 drops of the D-558-II #3 (1951 - 1956). As pilot of the B-29 Stan flew for 1 drop of the Bell X-1A (1955), 13 drops of the Bell X-1B (1956-1958) and 22 drops of the X-1E (1955 - 1958). During the lifting body tow tests Stan was pilot of the R4D that towed the M2-F1 to altitude for release. He made 14 tows in 1966. On June 13, 1966, Stanley P. Butchart became the Chief Pilot at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations? Flight Research Center and a few weeks
This NACA High-Speed Flight Station photograph of the Century Series fighters in formation flight was taken in 1957. The F-100 (lower center) had originally been built as a day fighter. The later versions were built as fighter bombers, with some seeing combat in Vietnam. The F-101 (top center) was designed as a long-range escort, but saw service as a fighter bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and interceptor. The F-102 (right) was designed from the start as an all-weather interceptor, and was used in this role throughout its service life. The F-104 (left) was originally designed as a light-weight fighter, but ended up being used as an interceptor and fighter bomber. These aircraft were flown by the NACA as part of a loan agreement with the Air Force. The NACA learned a great deal from these flights, in return for which NACA research pilots made evaluation flights in support of Air Force development efforts. Such tests were a major NACA activity during the 1950s, and included work on the F-89, F-100, and F-104.
NACA "Century Series" F...
May 1957
 
Description
This NACA High-Speed Flight Station photograph of the Century Series fighters in formation flight was taken in 1957. The F-100 (lower center) had originally been built as a day fighter. The later versions were built as fighter bombers, with some seeing combat in Vietnam. The F-101 (top center) was designed as a long-range escort, but saw service as a fighter bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and interceptor. The F-102 (right) was designed from the start as an all-weather interceptor, and was used in this role throughout its service life. The F-104 (left) was originally designed as a light-weight fighter, but ended up being used as an interceptor and fighter bomber. These aircraft were flown by the NACA as part of a loan agreement with the Air Force. The NACA learned a great deal from these flights, in return for which NACA research pilots made evaluation flights in support of Air Force development efforts. Such tests were a major NACA activity during the 1950s, and included work on the F-89, F-100, and F-104.
The NASA exceptional Service Medal presented at the NACA High Speed Flight Station. L-R: Hugh Dryden, Joe Walker (X-1A research pilot), Stan Butchart (pilot of the B-29 mothership), Richard Payne (X-1A crew chief).
The NACA Exceptional Se...
November 26, 1956
 
Description
The NASA exceptional Service Medal presented at the NACA High Speed Flight Station. L-R: Hugh Dryden, Joe Walker (X-1A research pilot), Stan Butchart (pilot of the B-29 mothership), Richard Payne (X-1A crew chief).
The employees of the NACA High-Speed Flight Station are gathered for a 1954 photo shoot on the front steps of building 4800, the new NACA Facility at Main Base of Edwards Air Force Base, California. This new building was considerably larger than the earlier NACA buildings on South Base, but then the staff had increased and the extra space was needed. From 1950 when an earlier group picture was taken (E-33717) until 1954 the staff at NACA increased from 132 to 250. As the workload increased and more research flights were completed the complement of employees grew to 662 in 1966. More changes took place in 1954 with the Station being called the NACA High-Speed Flight Station. A further name change occurred in October 1958 to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) High-Speed Flight Station and again in September 1959 to the NASA Flight Research Center. There would be two more name changes before the next group photo (EC85-33160-2) would be made. On March 1976 to NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center and in October 1981 when the Center became the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility.
Complete NACA Muroc Sta...
Aug. 1954
 
Description
The employees of the NACA High-Speed Flight Station are gathered for a 1954 photo shoot on the front steps of building 4800, the new NACA Facility at Main Base of Edwards Air Force Base, California. This new building was considerably larger than the earlier NACA buildings on South Base, but then the staff had increased and the extra space was needed. From 1950 when an earlier group picture was taken (E-33717) until 1954 the staff at NACA increased from 132 to 250. As the workload increased and more research flights were completed the complement of employees grew to 662 in 1966. More changes took place in 1954 with the Station being called the NACA High-Speed Flight Station. A further name change occurred in October 1958 to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) High-Speed Flight Station and again in September 1959 to the NASA Flight Research Center. There would be two more name changes before the next group photo (EC85-33160-2) would be made. On March 1976 to NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center and in October 1981 when the Center became the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility.
This group photo of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) employees was taken in 1950 in front of the NACA research building on South Base at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The team that had been established at Muroc Army Air Field in the later part of 1946 had grown to about 13 members at the beginning of 1947. In September of 1947 the group became known as the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit with a complement of 27 employees by January 1948. In February 1948 the name of the base changed to Muroc Air Force Base and in 1949 would change again to Edwards Air Force Base. In November 1949 the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit became the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station. In January 1950 there were 132 employees with those numbers increasing to 196 by January 1952.
Complete NACA Muroc Sta...
May 24, 1950
 
Description
This group photo of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) employees was taken in 1950 in front of the NACA research building on South Base at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The team that had been established at Muroc Army Air Field in the later part of 1946 had grown to about 13 members at the beginning of 1947. In September of 1947 the group became known as the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit with a complement of 27 employees by January 1948. In February 1948 the name of the base changed to Muroc Air Force Base and in 1949 would change again to Edwards Air Force Base. In November 1949 the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit became the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station. In January 1950 there were 132 employees with those numbers increasing to 196 by January 1952.
NACA High Speed Flight Station aircraft at South Base. Clockwise from far left: D-558-II, XF-92A, X-5, X-1, X-4, and D-558-I.
NACA Aircraft on ramp -...
March 30, 1952
 
Description
NACA High Speed Flight Station aircraft at South Base. Clockwise from far left: D-558-II, XF-92A, X-5, X-1, X-4, and D-558-I.
The NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, had initially been subordinate to the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory near Hampton, Virginia, but as the flight research in the Mojave Desert increasingly proved its worth after 1946, it made sense to make the Flight Research Station a separate entity reporting directly to the headquarters of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. But an autonomous center required all the trappings of a major research facility, including good quarters. With the adoption of the Edwards ?Master Plan,? the Air Force had committed itself to moving from its old South Base to a new location midway between the South and North Bases. The NACA would have to move also--so why not take advantage of the situation and move into a full-blown research facility. The Air Force issued a lease to NACA for a location on the northwestern shore of the Roger Dry Lake. Construction started on the NACA station in early February 1953. On a windy day, January 27, 1953, at a groundbreaking ceremony stood left to right: Gerald Truszynski, Head of Instrumentation Division; Joseph Vensel, Head of the Operations Branch; Walter Williams, Head of the Station, scooping the first shovel full of dirt; Marion Kent, Head of Personnel; and California state official Arthur Samet.
NACA Groundbreaking Cer...
January 27, 1953
 
Description
The NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, had initially been subordinate to the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory near Hampton, Virginia, but as the flight research in the Mojave Desert increasingly proved its worth after 1946, it made sense to make the Flight Research Station a separate entity reporting directly to the headquarters of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. But an autonomous center required all the trappings of a major research facility, including good quarters. With the adoption of the Edwards ?Master Plan,? the Air Force had committed itself to moving from its old South Base to a new location midway between the South and North Bases. The NACA would have to move also--so why not take advantage of the situation and move into a full-blown research facility. The Air Force issued a lease to NACA for a location on the northwestern shore of the Roger Dry Lake. Construction started on the NACA station in early February 1953. On a windy day, January 27, 1953, at a groundbreaking ceremony stood left to right: Gerald Truszynski, Head of Instrumentation Division; Joseph Vensel, Head of the Operations Branch; Walter Williams, Head of the Station, scooping the first shovel full of dirt; Marion Kent, Head of Personnel; and California state official Arthur Samet.
In August 1947, Howard Clifton Lilly became the first permanently assigned NACA engineering test pilot at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Muroc Flight Test Unit at what later became Edwards Air Force Base in California. During his assignment at Muroc, he flew both the XS-1 rocket research aircraft and the D-558-1 jet-powered research airplane. On 31 March 1948, Lilly became the third pilot to exceed the speed of sound in the XS-1. Lilly died on 3 May 1948 when the Douglas D-558-1 Skystreak he was flying crashed on takeoff. As the airplane climbed, somewhere within the jet engine's compressor section, a component failed. Sections of the compressor housing and blades cut through the engine casing and the fuselage skin. Some pieces cut the main fuel lines and severed the craft's control lines as well. Lilly had no control over the plane, which wallowed along for a few seconds before slipping into a left yaw and roll, then diving into the Rogers Dry Lakebed and exploding. He became the first NACA test pilot to be killed in the line of duty. At the time of his death, he had flown the Skystreak to a higher Mach number than it had previously reached-Mach 0.88 at 36,000 feet on 29 April 1948. Lilly had trained as a Naval aviator and joined the NACA at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Virginia (later, Langley Research Center) in October 1942. In May 1943 he was assigned to the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio (today's Glenn Research Center), where he flew numerous airplanes in flight research on powerplant systems. He then transferred to Muroc (later, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center). A native of West Virginia, Lilly was 31 at the time of his death. In honor of the NACA test pilot, the road leading to the Dryden Flight Research Center was named Lilly Avenue. The NACA was a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which came into existence on 1 October 1958.
NACA Dryden test pilot ...
1949
 
Description
In August 1947, Howard Clifton Lilly became the first permanently assigned NACA engineering test pilot at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Muroc Flight Test Unit at what later became Edwards Air Force Base in California. During his assignment at Muroc, he flew both the XS-1 rocket research aircraft and the D-558-1 jet-powered research airplane. On 31 March 1948, Lilly became the third pilot to exceed the speed of sound in the XS-1. Lilly died on 3 May 1948 when the Douglas D-558-1 Skystreak he was flying crashed on takeoff. As the airplane climbed, somewhere within the jet engine's compressor section, a component failed. Sections of the compressor housing and blades cut through the engine casing and the fuselage skin. Some pieces cut the main fuel lines and severed the craft's control lines as well. Lilly had no control over the plane, which wallowed along for a few seconds before slipping into a left yaw and roll, then diving into the Rogers Dry Lakebed and exploding. He became the first NACA test pilot to be killed in the line of duty. At the time of his death, he had flown the Skystreak to a higher Mach number than it had previously reached-Mach 0.88 at 36,000 feet on 29 April 1948. Lilly had trained as a Naval aviator and joined the NACA at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Virginia (later, Langley Research Center) in October 1942. In May 1943 he was assigned to the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio (today's Glenn Research Center), where he flew numerous airplanes in flight research on powerplant systems. He then transferred to Muroc (later, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center). A native of West Virginia, Lilly was 31 at the time of his death. In honor of the NACA test pilot, the road leading to the Dryden Flight Research Center was named Lilly Avenue. The NACA was a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which came into existence on 1 October 1958.
X-3 (center), and clockwise from left: X-1A, D-558-I, XF-92A, X-5, D-558-II, and X-4.
NACA X-Planes on ramp -...
August 4, 1953
 
Description
X-3 (center), and clockwise from left: X-1A, D-558-I, XF-92A, X-5, D-558-II, and X-4.
On a nice day in November 1949 the NACA High-Speed Flight Station employees enjoy a break from a week of research by attending a barbecue on the Rawliegh Duntley ranch. The food was excellent and the camaraderie with friends and family members was welcome. Games were played with the winners applauded--fun for everyone before the start of another week.
NACA Muroc Staff of 194...
November 1949
 
Description
On a nice day in November 1949 the NACA High-Speed Flight Station employees enjoy a break from a week of research by attending a barbecue on the Rawliegh Duntley ranch. The food was excellent and the camaraderie with friends and family members was welcome. Games were played with the winners applauded--fun for everyone before the start of another week.
The women of the Computer Department at NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station are shown busy with test flight calculations. The computers under the direction of Roxanah Yancey were responsible for accurate calculations on the research test flights made at the Station. There were no mechanical computers at the station in 1949, but data was reduced by human computers. Shown in this photograph starting at the left are: Geraldine Mayer and Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth with Friden calculators on the their desks; Emily Stephens conferring with engineer John Mayer; Gertrude (Trudy) Valentine is working on an oscillograph recording reducing the data from a flight. Across the desk is Dorothy Clift Hughes using a slide rule to complete data calculations. Roxanah Yancey completes the picture as she fills out engineering requests for further data.
Early NACA human comput...
October 1949
 
Description
The women of the Computer Department at NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station are shown busy with test flight calculations. The computers under the direction of Roxanah Yancey were responsible for accurate calculations on the research test flights made at the Station. There were no mechanical computers at the station in 1949, but data was reduced by human computers. Shown in this photograph starting at the left are: Geraldine Mayer and Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth with Friden calculators on the their desks; Emily Stephens conferring with engineer John Mayer; Gertrude (Trudy) Valentine is working on an oscillograph recording reducing the data from a flight. Across the desk is Dorothy Clift Hughes using a slide rule to complete data calculations. Roxanah Yancey completes the picture as she fills out engineering requests for further data.
X-3 (center), and clockwise from left: X-1A, D-558-I, XF-92A, X-5, D-558-II, and X-4.
NACA X-Planes on ramp -...
August 4, 1953
 
Description
X-3 (center), and clockwise from left: X-1A, D-558-I, XF-92A, X-5, D-558-II, and X-4.
Early "computers" at work, summer 1949. In the terminology of that period, computers were employees--typically female--who performed the arduous task of transribing raw data from roles of celluloid film and strips of oscillograph paper and then, using slide rules and electric calculators, reducing it to standard engineering units. Note mechanical calculator with Friden cover at left. The users named them "Galloping Gerties" because of their movement when in use. They used pads under them to cushion the motion. Seen here, left side, front to back, Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth, John Mayer and Emily Stephens. Right side, front to back, Lilly Ann Bajus, Roxanah Yancey, Gertrude (Trudy) Valentine (behind Roxanah), and Ilene Alexander.
NACA High Speed Flight ...
1949
 
Description
Early "computers" at work, summer 1949. In the terminology of that period, computers were employees--typically female--who performed the arduous task of transribing raw data from roles of celluloid film and strips of oscillograph paper and then, using slide rules and electric calculators, reducing it to standard engineering units. Note mechanical calculator with Friden cover at left. The users named them "Galloping Gerties" because of their movement when in use. They used pads under them to cushion the motion. Seen here, left side, front to back, Mary (Tut) Hedgepeth, John Mayer and Emily Stephens. Right side, front to back, Lilly Ann Bajus, Roxanah Yancey, Gertrude (Trudy) Valentine (behind Roxanah), and Ilene Alexander.
Clockwise from far left: D-558-II, XF-92A, X-5, X-1, X-4, D-558-I.
NACA Aircraft Fleet on ...
March 30, 1952
 
Description
Clockwise from far left: D-558-II, XF-92A, X-5, X-1, X-4, D-558-I.
NACA Aircraft on Lakebe...
Early NACA research air...
August 12, 1955
 
Some NACA Muroc personn...
The late 1940s saw incr...
15 Nov 1949
 
NACA Aircraft in hangar...
April 27, 1953
 
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