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Browse All : Pegasus

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External Tank 130 Arrives
External Tank 130 Arriv...
NASA/Jack Pfaller
12/4/08
 
Year 2008
External Tank 130 Arrives
External Tank 130 Arriv...
NASA/Jack Pfaller
12/4/08
 
Year 2008
External Tank 130 Arrives
External Tank 130 Arriv...
NASA
1/27/09
 
Year 2009
X-43A
X-43A
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
NB-52B
NB-52B
1/5/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
X-24A Powered Flight Drop from B-52
X-24A Powered Flight Dr...
Lifting Bodies
01/01/1970
NASA
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Hyper-X Wind Tunnel Tests
Hyper-X Wind Tunnel Tes...
Wind Tunnels-Interior
11/10/1996
NASA Fred Jones
 
NASA Center Langley Research Center
Type 2 Quasar: Gravitat...
 
M15: Two X-ray Binary S...
 
Stephan's Quintet: Intr...
HCG 92
 
3C442A: Galaxy Collisio...
 
Saturn I S-I Stage at Michoud Assembly Facility
Saturn I S-I Stage at M...
1964-11-01
 
Saturn I S-IV Stage Assembly for SA-9
Saturn I S-IV Stage Ass...
1964-11-01
 
NASA Officials During the SA-8 Launch in the Launch Control Center
NASA Officials During t...
1965-05-25
 
Dr. von Braun Waiting for Saturn I (SA-8) Launch
Dr. von Braun Waiting f...
1965-05-25
 
Saturn Missions and Configurations Chart
Saturn Missions and Con...
1975-01-01
 
Dr. von Braun and Dr. Debus During the SA-9 Launch
Dr. von Braun and Dr. D...
1965-02-16
 
The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
The X-43A hypersonic re...
March 15, 2001
 
Description The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
As part of a combined systems test conducted by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway at Edwards Air Force Base with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket attached to a pylon under its right wing. The taxi test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
NASA's NB-52B carrier a...
March 15, 2001
 
Description As part of a combined systems test conducted by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway at Edwards Air Force Base with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket attached to a pylon under its right wing. The taxi test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket are nestled under the wing of NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft during pre-flight systems testing at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
The X-43A hypersonic re...
March 15, 2001
 
Description The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket are nestled under the wing of NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft during pre-flight systems testing at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.
NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway at Edwards Air Force Base with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket slung from a pylon under its right wing. Part of a combined systems test conducted by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, the taxi test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, with the first tentatively scheduled for late spring to early summer, 2001.
NASA's NB-52B carrier a...
March 15, 2001
 
Description NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway at Edwards Air Force Base with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus? booster rocket slung from a pylon under its right wing. Part of a combined systems test conducted by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, the taxi test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ("scramjet") engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, with the first tentatively scheduled for late spring to early summer, 2001.
310,000 feet. Bill was the pilot on the final (199th) flight of the 10-year program. Other research and support programs Dana participated in were the F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC), the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), YF-12, F-104, F-16, PA-30, and T-38. In 1993 Dana became Chief Engineer at NASA?s Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (soon to be renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center). Ishmael was a research pilot at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center from January 1977 until the spring of 1995, when he became manager of Dryden?s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) programs. In 1996 he became NASA?s X-33 Deputy Manager for Flight Test and Operation. As a research pilot he served as the chief project pilot on two major aeronautical research programs, the SR-71 High Speed Research program and the F-16XL Laminar Flow Technology program. He took part in the X-29 Forward-Swept-Wing program, and gave support to other pilots? research flights in a T-38 and F-104 aircraft. Smith became a research pilot at NASA?s Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in August 1982. In the spring of 1995 he became Chief of the Flight Crew Branch where currently there are 8 other NASA pilots and 2 flight engineers. Smith has also been a co-project pilot on two major aeronautical programs at Dryden. They are the integrated thrust vectoring F-15 ACTIVE and the SR-71 ?Blackbird? Research programs. Other research programs that he has been associated with are the F-104 Zero ?G? tests, F-18 HARV, X-29 Forward-Swept-Wing, with support flights being flown in a T-38 and F-104. McMurtry has been a pilot at NASA?s Dryden since joining the Flight Research Center in November 1967. In 1981, Tom became Chief Pilot a position he held until February 1986, when he was appointed Chief of the Research Aircraft Operations Division. McMurtry has been project pilot for the AD-1 Oblique Wing program, the F-15 Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) project and the F-8 Supercritical Wing program. He was co- project pilot on the F-15 ACTIVE program, F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire program and on several remotely piloted research vehicle programs such as the FAA/NASA 720 Controlled Impact Demonstration and the sub-scale F-15 spin research project. He has also been a co-project pilot on the NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft.
Dryden Test Pilots 1990...
1990
 
Description 310,000 feet. Bill was the pilot on the final (199th) flight of the 10-year program. Other research and support programs Dana participated in were the F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC), the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), YF-12, F-104, F-16, PA-30, and T-38. In 1993 Dana became Chief Engineer at NASA?s Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (soon to be renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center). Ishmael was a research pilot at NASA?s Dryden Flight Research Center from January 1977 until the spring of 1995, when he became manager of Dryden?s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) programs. In 1996 he became NASA?s X-33 Deputy Manager for Flight Test and Operation. As a research pilot he served as the chief project pilot on two major aeronautical research programs, the SR-71 High Speed Research program and the F-16XL Laminar Flow Technology program. He took part in the X-29 Forward-Swept-Wing program, and gave support to other pilots? research flights in a T-38 and F-104 aircraft. Smith became a research pilot at NASA?s Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility in August 1982. In the spring of 1995 he became Chief of the Flight Crew Branch where currently there are 8 other NASA pilots and 2 flight engineers. Smith has also been a co-project pilot on two major aeronautical programs at Dryden. They are the integrated thrust vectoring F-15 ACTIVE and the SR-71 ?Blackbird? Research programs. Other research programs that he has been associated with are the F-104 Zero ?G? tests, F-18 HARV, X-29 Forward-Swept-Wing, with support flights being flown in a T-38 and F-104. McMurtry has been a pilot at NASA?s Dryden since joining the Flight Research Center in November 1967. In 1981, Tom became Chief Pilot a position he held until February 1986, when he was appointed Chief of the Research Aircraft Operations Division. McMurtry has been project pilot for the AD-1 Oblique Wing program, the F-15 Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) project and the F-8 Supercritical Wing program. He was co- project pilot on the F-15 ACTIVE program, F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire program and on several remotely piloted research vehicle programs such as the FAA/NASA 720 Controlled Impact Demonstration and the sub-scale F-15 spin research project. He has also been a co-project pilot on the NASA 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft.
Interior of custom radi...
2 Jul 1996
 
X-43A departs NASA Dryd...
The first X-43A hyperso...
June 2, 2001
 
The X-43A/Pegasus combi...
The first X-43A hyperso...
June 2, 2001
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
NASA's B-52B launch air...
March 26, 2004
 
NASA personnel in a con...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
NASA's B-52B aircraft o...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
NASA's historic B-52 mo...
Jan. 26, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
NASA's historic B-52 mo...
Jan. 26, 2004
 
NASA's historic B-52 mo...
Jan. 26, 2004
 
The Hyper-X X-43A proje...
March 23, 2004
 
The black X-43A rides o...
January 26, 2004
 
Employees atop NASA Dry...
March 27, 2004
 
Orbital Sciences Corp. ...
November 16, 2004
 
The Pegasus rocket that...
November 16, 2004
 
The third X-43A hyperso...
November 16, 2004
 
The third X-43A hyperso...
November 16, 2004
 
The small size of the X...
November 15, 2004
 
The third X-43A hyperso...
November 16, 2004
 
Hitching a ride on the ...
January 26, 2004
 
Hitching a ride on the ...
January 26, 2004
 
The second X-43A hypers...
March 27, 2004
 
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