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SOHO/SWAN Ultraviolet Image of Comet Hale-Bopp Approaching the Sun A time series of 6 images of comet Hale-Bopp taken by the SWAN instrument on board SOHO in the ultraviolet light (110-180 nm), on January 4, February 2 and 18, March 4 and 16, and April 3, 1997, as the comet slowly approaches the Sun, and increases in brightness. Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and has an estimated diameter of about 40 km. In contrast, the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers across, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of SWAN data of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second during closest approach, forming its brilliant tail, until recently clearly visible in the night sky. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
SOHO/SWAN Ultraviolet I...
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Description SOHO/SWAN Ultraviolet Image of Comet Hale-Bopp Approaching the Sun A time series of 6 images of comet Hale-Bopp taken by the SWAN instrument on board SOHO in the ultraviolet light (110-180 nm), on January 4, February 2 and 18, March 4 and 16, and April 3, 1997, as the comet slowly approaches the Sun, and increases in brightness. Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and has an estimated diameter of about 40 km. In contrast, the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers across, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of SWAN data of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second during closest approach, forming its brilliant tail, until recently clearly visible in the night sky. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. False color image of the sky in the 110-180 nm spectral range made by the SWAN instrument on-board SOHO on April 3, 1997. The SWAN instrument observes the solar UV light which is back scattered by neutral hydrogen in the interplanetary medium. Comet Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and its size is estimated to be about 40 km of diameter. In contrast, the size of the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second on this day. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
Comet Hale-Bopp observe...
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Description Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. False color image of the sky in the 110-180 nm spectral range made by the SWAN instrument on-board SOHO on April 3, 1997. The SWAN instrument observes the solar UV light which is back scattered by neutral hydrogen in the interplanetary medium. Comet Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and its size is estimated to be about 40 km of diameter. In contrast, the size of the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second on this day. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
Blasting CME -- This LASCO C2 image, taken 8 January 2002, shows a widely spreading coronal mass ejection (CME) shooting billi Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 2 2003-04-07T19:50:00Z 2003-04-07T19:50:00Z 1 NASA GSGC 1 1 9.2511 800x600 0 0 Blasting CME --  This LASCO C2 image, taken 8 January 2002, shows a widely spreading coronal mass ejection (CME) as it blasts more than a billion tons of matter out into space at millions of kilometers per hour.  The C2 image was turned 90 degrees so that the blast seems to be pointing down.  An EIT 304 Angstrom image from a different day was enlarged and superimposed on the C2 image so that it filled the occulting disk for effect.
Blasting CME -- This LA...
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Description Blasting CME -- This LASCO C2 image, taken 8 January 2002, shows a widely spreading coronal mass ejection (CME) shooting billi Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 2 2003-04-07T19:50:00Z 2003-04-07T19:50:00Z 1 NASA GSGC 1 1 9.2511 800x600 0 0 Blasting CME --  This LASCO C2 image, taken 8 January 2002, shows a widely spreading coronal mass ejection (CME) as it blasts more than a billion tons of matter out into space at millions of kilometers per hour.  The C2 image was turned 90 degrees so that the blast seems to be pointing down.  An EIT 304 Angstrom image from a different day was enlarged and superimposed on the C2 image so that it filled the occulting disk for effect.
The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of C III lines at 977.020 , formed in the transition region at a temperature of about 70 000 K. The image is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec. The patchy pattern is the chromospheric network, with individual cells being of the size of about 30 000 km. Also note some prominences over the limb. This image was the first full Sun scan of SUMER.
The Sun observed by SUM...
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Description The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of C III lines at 977.020 , formed in the transition region at a temperature of about 70 000 K. The image is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec. The patchy pattern is the chromospheric network, with individual cells being of the size of about 30 000 km. Also note some prominences over the limb. This image was the first full Sun scan of SUMER.
The Sun in C IV 1548 A as observed by SUMER on 4-5 February 1996. The picture was put together from eight horizontal raster scans across the Sun, altogether 7406 exposures, each lasting 15 seconds. The picture is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec.
The Sun in C IV 1548 A ...
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Description The Sun in C IV 1548 A as observed by SUMER on 4-5 February 1996. The picture was put together from eight horizontal raster scans across the Sun, altogether 7406 exposures, each lasting 15 seconds. The picture is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec.
Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. False color image of the sky (in ecliptic coordinates) in the 110-180 nm spectral range made by the SWAN instrument on-board SOHO on April 3, 1997. The SWAN instrument observes the solar UV light which is back scattered by neutral hydrogen in the interplanetary medium. Comet Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and its size is estimated to be about 40 km of diameter. In contrast, the size of the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second on this day. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
Comet Hale-Bopp observe...
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Description Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. False color image of the sky (in ecliptic coordinates) in the 110-180 nm spectral range made by the SWAN instrument on-board SOHO on April 3, 1997. The SWAN instrument observes the solar UV light which is back scattered by neutral hydrogen in the interplanetary medium. Comet Hale-Bopp is clearly visible because of its huge hydrogen cloud produced by photo-dissociation of water vapor molecules evaporated from the solid nucleus. This nucleus is composed of ice and dust and its size is estimated to be about 40 km of diameter. In contrast, the size of the hydrogen cloud is more than 100 million kilometers, which makes it the largest object in the solar system. The analysis of the hydrogen cloud indicates that about 600 tons of ice are vaporized and ejected in space each second on this day. Credits: SOHO (SWAN consortium), ESA, NASA. SWAN: Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS (France), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland) SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.
UVCS/EIT composite image. The Sun's outer atmosphere a s it appears in ultraviolet light emitted by electrically charged oxygen flowing away from the Sun to form the solar wind (region outside black circle), and the disk of the Sun in light emitted by electrically charged iron at temperatures n ear two million degrees Celsius (region inside circle). This composite image tak en by two instruments (UVCS, outer region and EIT, inner region) shows dark area s called coronal holes at the poles and across the disk of the Sun where the hig hest speed solar wind originates. UVCS has discovered that the oxygen atoms flow ing out of these regions have extremely high energies corresponding to temperatu res of over 200 million degrees Celsius and accelerate to supersonic outflow vel ocities within 1.5 solar radii of the solar surface. The structure of the corona is controlled by the Sun's magnetic field which forms the bright active regions and the ray-like structures originating in the coronal holes. The composite ima ge allows one to trace these structures from the base of the corona to millions above the solar surface.
UVCS/EIT composite imag...
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Description UVCS/EIT composite image. The Sun's outer atmosphere a s it appears in ultraviolet light emitted by electrically charged oxygen flowing away from the Sun to form the solar wind (region outside black circle), and the disk of the Sun in light emitted by electrically charged iron at temperatures n ear two million degrees Celsius (region inside circle). This composite image tak en by two instruments (UVCS, outer region and EIT, inner region) shows dark area s called coronal holes at the poles and across the disk of the Sun where the hig hest speed solar wind originates. UVCS has discovered that the oxygen atoms flow ing out of these regions have extremely high energies corresponding to temperatu res of over 200 million degrees Celsius and accelerate to supersonic outflow vel ocities within 1.5 solar radii of the solar surface. The structure of the corona is controlled by the Sun's magnetic field which forms the bright active regions and the ray-like structures originating in the coronal holes. The composite ima ge allows one to trace these structures from the base of the corona to millions above the solar surface.
A long whip-like eruptive prominence is captured in this EIT 304Å image on 30 July 2002. Although one end of the prominence is still attached to the Sun, it probably broke away soon after the image was taken--it was gone in the next image 6 hours later. Prominences are huge clouds of relatively cool dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, thin corona. At times, they can erupt, escaping the Sun's atmosphere. Emission in this spectral line shows the upper chromosphere at a temperature of about 60,000 degrees K.
A long whip-like erupti...
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Description A long whip-like eruptive prominence is captured in this EIT 304Å image on 30 July 2002. Although one end of the prominence is still attached to the Sun, it probably broke away soon after the image was taken--it was gone in the next image 6 hours later. Prominences are huge clouds of relatively cool dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, thin corona. At times, they can erupt, escaping the Sun's atmosphere. Emission in this spectral line shows the upper chromosphere at a temperature of about 60,000 degrees K.
A comparison of three EIT images almost three years apart illustrates how the level of solar activity has increased significantly. The Sun attains its expected sunspot maximum of its 11-years solar cycle in the year 2000. These images are captured using Fe XII 195 ? emissions showing the solar corona at a temperature of about 1 million K. Many more sunspots, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections occur during the solar maximum. The progression towards more active regions and the number/size of magnetic loops is unmistakable.
A comparison of three E...
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Description A comparison of three EIT images almost three years apart illustrates how the level of solar activity has increased significantly. The Sun attains its expected sunspot maximum of its 11-years solar cycle in the year 2000. These images are captured using Fe XII 195 ? emissions showing the solar corona at a temperature of about 1 million K. Many more sunspots, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections occur during the solar maximum. The progression towards more active regions and the number/size of magnetic loops is unmistakable.
This composite image combines EIT images from three wavelengths (171Å, 195Å and 284Å) into one that reveals solar features unique to each wavelength. Since the EIT images come to us from the spacecraft in black and white, they are color coded for easy identification. For this image, the nearly simultaneous images from May 1998 were each given a color code (red, yellow and blue) and merged into one.
This composite image co...
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Description This composite image combines EIT images from three wavelengths (171Å, 195Å and 284Å) into one that reveals solar features unique to each wavelength. Since the EIT images come to us from the spacecraft in black and white, they are color coded for easy identification. For this image, the nearly simultaneous images from May 1998 were each given a color code (red, yellow and blue) and merged into one.
Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. SOHO looks at a comet's shadow in space Depicted here is a series of three images of Comet Hale-Bopp's shadow taken by SOHO's SWAN instrument between 25 February, 1997 and 8 March, 1997. The blue-white monochrome images show a portion of the sky illuminated by the Sun's ultraviolet light. The Sun is shown as a round dot at the bottom. The bright white glow at the centre is a 150-million-kilometre-wide hydrogen cloud released by Hale-Bopp's nucleus. As the comet neared the Sun, the water-ice nucleus began to vaporize. Ultraviolet radiation then split the water molecules, which freed the hydrogen. The resulting hydrogen cloud absorbed the ultraviolet light emitted by the Sun, which was no longer available to illuminate the background of interstellar hydrogen. That resulted in an elongated, 150-million-kilometre-long shadow of the comet projected in sky, which is visible in the upper part of each image. The comet's movement in the sky (right to left) is evident by looking at the blue three-image sequence. The image bottom left is a schematic that depicts the geometry of the SWAN observations
Comet Hale-Bopp observe...
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Description Comet Hale-Bopp observed by SOHO/SWAN on April 3, 1997. SOHO looks at a comet's shadow in space Depicted here is a series of three images of Comet Hale-Bopp's shadow taken by SOHO's SWAN instrument between 25 February, 1997 and 8 March, 1997. The blue-white monochrome images show a portion of the sky illuminated by the Sun's ultraviolet light. The Sun is shown as a round dot at the bottom. The bright white glow at the centre is a 150-million-kilometre-wide hydrogen cloud released by Hale-Bopp's nucleus. As the comet neared the Sun, the water-ice nucleus began to vaporize. Ultraviolet radiation then split the water molecules, which freed the hydrogen. The resulting hydrogen cloud absorbed the ultraviolet light emitted by the Sun, which was no longer available to illuminate the background of interstellar hydrogen. That resulted in an elongated, 150-million-kilometre-long shadow of the comet projected in sky, which is visible in the upper part of each image. The comet's movement in the sky (right to left) is evident by looking at the blue three-image sequence. The image bottom left is a schematic that depicts the geometry of the SWAN observations
The Sun's outer atmosphere as it appears in ultraviolet light emitted by electrically charged oxygen flowing away from the Sun to form the solar wind (region outside black circle), and the disk of the Sun in light emitted by electrically charged iron at temperatures near two million degrees Celsius (region inside circle). This composite image taken by two instruments (UVCS, outer region and EIT, inner region) aboard the SOHO spacecraft shows dark areas called coronal holes at the poles and across the disk of the Sun where the highest speed solar wind originates. UVCS has discovered that the oxygen atoms flowing out of these regions have extremely high energies corresponding to temperatures of over 200 million degrees Celsius and accelerate to supersonic outflow velocities within 1.5 solar radii of the solar surface. The structure of the corona is controlled by the Sun's magnetic field which forms the bright active regions and the ray-like structures originating in the coronal holes. The composite image allows one to trace these structures from the base of the corona to millions of kilometers above the solar surface.
The Sun's outer atmosph...
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Description The Sun's outer atmosphere as it appears in ultraviolet light emitted by electrically charged oxygen flowing away from the Sun to form the solar wind (region outside black circle), and the disk of the Sun in light emitted by electrically charged iron at temperatures near two million degrees Celsius (region inside circle). This composite image taken by two instruments (UVCS, outer region and EIT, inner region) aboard the SOHO spacecraft shows dark areas called coronal holes at the poles and across the disk of the Sun where the highest speed solar wind originates. UVCS has discovered that the oxygen atoms flowing out of these regions have extremely high energies corresponding to temperatures of over 200 million degrees Celsius and accelerate to supersonic outflow velocities within 1.5 solar radii of the solar surface. The structure of the corona is controlled by the Sun's magnetic field which forms the bright active regions and the ray-like structures originating in the coronal holes. The composite image allows one to trace these structures from the base of the corona to millions of kilometers above the solar surface.
The figure is a composite image taken by three SOHO instruments at the time of the 21 April 2002 solar flare. The green image of the solar disk at the time of the flare was taken by EIT in light emitted by iron ions at about 2 million degrees Kelvin. The blue/white image of a coronal mass ejection associated with the flare was taken by LASCO in visible light. UVCS images of the region outlined in white were made in light from four ultraviolet emissions, each showing threads of ejected material at very different temperatures above the flare. The `images' are constructed from a time sequence of observations as the ejected material moved through a region located 0.63 solar radii above the flare site. From top to bottom the UVCS images are total intensities from the emission of iron ([Fe XVIII] 974 A), silicon (Si XII 499 A), oxygen (O VI 1032,1037 A), and neutral hydrogen (H I Lyman alpha 1216 A). These emissions tend to form in regions where the gas is at 6 million degrees K, 2 million degrees K, 300 thousand d egrees K, and 20 thousand degrees K, respectively. Spectroscopy can be used to probe the extreme conditions during a solar flare where non-thermal processes are thought to be involved in producing the observed emissions. This composite image was produced by Alexander Panasyuk (SAO).
The figure is a composi...
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Description The figure is a composite image taken by three SOHO instruments at the time of the 21 April 2002 solar flare. The green image of the solar disk at the time of the flare was taken by EIT in light emitted by iron ions at about 2 million degrees Kelvin. The blue/white image of a coronal mass ejection associated with the flare was taken by LASCO in visible light. UVCS images of the region outlined in white were made in light from four ultraviolet emissions, each showing threads of ejected material at very different temperatures above the flare. The `images' are constructed from a time sequence of observations as the ejected material moved through a region located 0.63 solar radii above the flare site. From top to bottom the UVCS images are total intensities from the emission of iron ([Fe XVIII] 974 A), silicon (Si XII 499 A), oxygen (O VI 1032,1037 A), and neutral hydrogen (H I Lyman alpha 1216 A). These emissions tend to form in regions where the gas is at 6 million degrees K, 2 million degrees K, 300 thousand d egrees K, and 20 thousand degrees K, respectively. Spectroscopy can be used to probe the extreme conditions during a solar flare where non-thermal processes are thought to be involved in producing the observed emissions. This composite image was produced by Alexander Panasyuk (SAO).
In a run of observations at the SOHO Experiment Operation Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA), the UVCS has observed the passage close to the Sun of a newly discovered comet (SOHO-8/Stetzelberger) on the 1st and 2nd of May, 1997. These images, from right to left, show the comet as it approached the Sun. The comet was followed by UVCS in its path toward the Sun along a direction coming from the Northwest limb and inclined by 30 degrees with respect to the equator. At distances from the Sun center of less than 2 solar radii the comet became indistinguishable from the solar corona. After Sun-crossing the comet became visible again on May 2nd, when it emerged from an intense coronal streamer at 13 degrees South of the equator on the East limb. It was followed with UVCS from 5.4 to 8.2 solar radii, i.e., until 01:08 UT on May 3 1997. Its velocity along the portion of trajectory observed with UVCS was of the order of 100 km/sec.
In a run of observation...
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Description In a run of observations at the SOHO Experiment Operation Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA), the UVCS has observed the passage close to the Sun of a newly discovered comet (SOHO-8/Stetzelberger) on the 1st and 2nd of May, 1997. These images, from right to left, show the comet as it approached the Sun. The comet was followed by UVCS in its path toward the Sun along a direction coming from the Northwest limb and inclined by 30 degrees with respect to the equator. At distances from the Sun center of less than 2 solar radii the comet became indistinguishable from the solar corona. After Sun-crossing the comet became visible again on May 2nd, when it emerged from an intense coronal streamer at 13 degrees South of the equator on the East limb. It was followed with UVCS from 5.4 to 8.2 solar radii, i.e., until 01:08 UT on May 3 1997. Its velocity along the portion of trajectory observed with UVCS was of the order of 100 km/sec.
C2 Trio CME series - A strong solar storm erupted from the Sun (25 April 2003). The still series of three LASCO C2 coronagraph frames show the CME as it evolved over a two-hour period. In it the structures of the expanding cloud are unusually strong and clearly defined.
C2 Trio CME series - A ...
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Description C2 Trio CME series - A strong solar storm erupted from the Sun (25 April 2003). The still series of three LASCO C2 coronagraph frames show the CME as it evolved over a two-hour period. In it the structures of the expanding cloud are unusually strong and clearly defined.
Images showing two, then three coronal mass ejections 13 June 2001 taken by LASCO C2 Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 1 1 2001-06-13T15:46:00Z 2001-06-13T15:47:00Z 1 58 335 NASA GSGC 2 1 411 9.2511 800x600 0 0 Images showing two, then three coronal mass ejections 13 June 2001 taken by LASCO C2. Rarely has SOHO seen three CMEs in a LASCO C2 image because these blasts usually disappear from its field of view too quickly.  CMEs eject a billion tons of particles traveling millions of miles an hour. The dark disk blocks the Sun so that the LASCO instrument can observe the structures of the corona in visible light.
Images showing two, the...
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Description Images showing two, then three coronal mass ejections 13 June 2001 taken by LASCO C2 Joseph B. Gurman Normal Joseph B. Gurman 1 1 2001-06-13T15:46:00Z 2001-06-13T15:47:00Z 1 58 335 NASA GSGC 2 1 411 9.2511 800x600 0 0 Images showing two, then three coronal mass ejections 13 June 2001 taken by LASCO C2. Rarely has SOHO seen three CMEs in a LASCO C2 image because these blasts usually disappear from its field of view too quickly.  CMEs eject a billion tons of particles traveling millions of miles an hour. The dark disk blocks the Sun so that the LASCO instrument can observe the structures of the corona in visible light.
Double prominences -- Two large solar prominences in extreme ultraviolet light (ionized helium at 304) roughly the same size but quite different in structure appeared on the Sun on 18 March 2003. The observation of two large prominences in one image makes this one of the most spectacular images that SOHO has captured. Prominences are large clouds of relatively cool, dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, tenuous corona. Magnetic fields built up enormous forces that propelled particles out beyond the Sun's surface. The one on the right and possibly both were associated with a flare and a coronal mass ejection that blasted away from the Sun at about the time of this image. The twisting nature of the one on the right is of particular interest to some solar physicists who believe that eruptive events like this are the Sun's way of getting rid of magnetic fields that are twisted up too tightly, like the rubber bands that run model airplanes. For a sense of scale, the prominences extend about 20 Earths out from the Sun. They both had disappeared by the time the next image was taken 6 hours later.
Double prominences -- T...
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Description Double prominences -- Two large solar prominences in extreme ultraviolet light (ionized helium at 304) roughly the same size but quite different in structure appeared on the Sun on 18 March 2003. The observation of two large prominences in one image makes this one of the most spectacular images that SOHO has captured. Prominences are large clouds of relatively cool, dense plasma suspended in the Sun's hot, tenuous corona. Magnetic fields built up enormous forces that propelled particles out beyond the Sun's surface. The one on the right and possibly both were associated with a flare and a coronal mass ejection that blasted away from the Sun at about the time of this image. The twisting nature of the one on the right is of particular interest to some solar physicists who believe that eruptive events like this are the Sun's way of getting rid of magnetic fields that are twisted up too tightly, like the rubber bands that run model airplanes. For a sense of scale, the prominences extend about 20 Earths out from the Sun. They both had disappeared by the time the next image was taken 6 hours later.
Large Sunspot Aimed at Earth
Large Sunspot Aimed at ...
At 20 times the size of...<a href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/"></a>
 
A Backward Sunspot and the New Solar Cycle
A Backward Sunspot and ...
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Sun Storm: A Coronal Mass Ejection
Sun Storm: A Coronal Ma...
SOHO
2002
 
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A Solar Prominence Erupts
A Solar Prominence Erup...
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2007
 
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The Iron Sun
The Iron Sun
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September 22, 2001
 
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The Iron Sun
The Iron Sun
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Coronal Hole
Coronal Hole
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A Twisted Solar Eruptive Prominence
A Twisted Solar Eruptiv...
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The Iron Sun
The Iron Sun
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Tomorrow's picture: Red Sun Streaming [ http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970107.html ]
Tomorrow's picture: Red...<a target="_blank" href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970107.html"></a>
SOHO
 
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Tomorrow's picture: Grey Sun Seething [ http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970108.html ]
Tomorrow's picture: Gre...<a target="_blank" href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970108.html"></a>
SOHO
 
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Tomorrow's picture: Arecibo: The Largest Telescope [ http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970412.html ]
Tomorrow's picture: Are...<a target="_blank" href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970412.html"></a>
SOHO
 
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A Complete Solar Cycle from SOHO
A Complete Solar Cycle ...
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1996
 
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The Magnetic Carpet Of The Sun
The Magnetic Carpet Of ...
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Solar Flares Cause Sun Quakes
Solar Flares Cause Sun ...
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Solar Magnetic Bananas
Solar Magnetic Bananas
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SOHO Composite: Coronal Mass Ejection
SOHO Composite: Coronal...
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November 6, 1997
 
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A Great Day For SOHO
A Great Day For SOHO
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Color Composite of Solar Features
Color Composite of Sola...
This composite image co...<a target="_blank" href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov"></a>
05.01.1998
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