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Total Eclipse of the Sun
Total Eclipse of the Su...
6/9/08
NASA
 
Year
2008
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Full solar disk from SO...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 284 Angstro...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 304 Angstro...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
TRACE (blue) at 171 Ang...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
The first image from VA...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Border appears around s...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Close-up view of the pl...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
The plume region at lat...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Active Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
None
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
Full solar disk from SO...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 284 Angstro...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 304 Angstro...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
TRACE (blue) at 171 Ang...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
The first image from VA...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
A view from the second ...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
A view in the H-alpha l...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
Magnetograms from SOHO-...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
A final view of the reg...
 
High Resolution Solar Views From VAULT
High Resolution Solar V...
SOHO/EIT
None
 
TRACE Observes Flows over Active Regions (Slow play)
TRACE Observes Flows ov...
SOHO/EIT
Full-disk view of the S...
 
TRACE Observes Flows over Active Regions (Slow play)
TRACE Observes Flows ov...
SOHO/EIT
Close-up view of the ou...
 
TRACE Observes Flows over Active Regions (Slow play)
TRACE Observes Flows ov...
SOHO/EIT
None
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Full solar disk from SO...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 284 Angstro...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
SOHO-EIT at 304 Angstro...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
TRACE (blue) at 171 Ang...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
The first image from VA...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Border appears around a...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
Close-up view of the qu...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
The quiet region in the...
 
Hi-resolution Solar Views from VAULT: Quiet Region
Hi-resolution Solar Vie...
SOHO/EIT
None
 
Solar Eclipse: December 4, 2002
Solar Eclipse: December...
Apogee AP8p CCD
Solar eclipse in red co...
 
Solar Eclipse: December 4, 2002
Solar Eclipse: December...
Apogee AP8p CCD
Red continuum image com...
 
Solar Eclipse: December 4, 2002
Solar Eclipse: December...
Apogee AP8p CCD
SOHO-EIT near the time ...
 
Building a 3-D Coronal Mass Ejection from 2-D Data
Building a 3-D Coronal ...
SOHO/LASCO/C2
View of the CME from th...
 
Building a 3-D Coronal Mass Ejection from 2-D Data
Building a 3-D Coronal ...
SOHO/LASCO/C2
View of the CME from ab...
 
Building a 3-D Coronal Mass Ejection from 2-D Data
Building a 3-D Coronal ...
SOHO/LASCO/C2
View of the CME from th...
 
Building a 3-D Coronal Mass Ejection from 2-D Data
Building a 3-D Coronal ...
SOHO/LASCO/C2
View of the CME from ab...
 
Using STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft's highest resolution frames (2048×2048 pixels per frame), we can zoom in a lot on areas of interest and still maintain good visual acuity. Over 34 hours (June 29-30, 2007), we zoom in on a pair of active regions and observe numerous instances of flaring activity, especially from the lead one of the two. These were low intensity flares. With frames taken every 10 minutes (and paced here at six frames a second), the motion is not jumpy or freeze-framed. It looks like a small surge of material reaches out from the trailing active region just before the clip ends. The image and clip show material at about 60,000 degrees C not far above the Sun's surface as seen in extreme ultraviolet light. (The still image shows a brightening of one active region whose intensity caused an optical illusion or aberration across the frame).
Using STEREO (Ahead) sp...
Image
 
Description
Using STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft's highest resolution frames (2048×2048 pixels per frame), we can zoom in a lot on areas of interest and still maintain good visual acuity. Over 34 hours (June 29-30, 2007), we zoom in on a pair of active regions and observe numerous instances of flaring activity, especially from the lead one of the two. These were low intensity flares. With frames taken every 10 minutes (and paced here at six frames a second), the motion is not jumpy or freeze-framed. It looks like a small surge of material reaches out from the trailing active region just before the clip ends. The image and clip show material at about 60,000 degrees C not far above the Sun's surface as seen in extreme ultraviolet light. (The still image shows a brightening of one active region whose intensity caused an optical illusion or aberration across the frame).
Many people ask if we are at solar minimum yet and how do we know when we are. Solar minimum is the period when the Sun has reached its lowest point of solar activity in its 11-year cycle. One way to see if we are there yet is to observe the solar corona, easily seen in SOHO's C2 coronograph images. The structure we see in the coronagraph images is a marker for the global magnetic field extending into the corona and heliosphere. When the Sun is at its minimum and the corona is "relaxed", the elongated structures in the corona will extend out horizontally with both sides fairly balanced. See the bottom coronagraph from 1996. At solar minimum, it's a simple "dipole" field, like a bar magnet's, and aligned with the solar equator. Compare that with the corona in an image from October 3, 2007 -- the structures are angled and unbalanced and they have looked like this for some time. In the absence of almost any sunspots over the past month or more, we still have this strong indicator that we are NOT there yet. Many predictors suggest that we will reach solar minimum sometime between January and March, 2008. So, we'll just have to be patient.
Many people ask if we a...
Image
 
Description
Many people ask if we are at solar minimum yet and how do we know when we are. Solar minimum is the period when the Sun has reached its lowest point of solar activity in its 11-year cycle. One way to see if we are there yet is to observe the solar corona, easily seen in SOHO's C2 coronograph images. The structure we see in the coronagraph images is a marker for the global magnetic field extending into the corona and heliosphere. When the Sun is at its minimum and the corona is "relaxed", the elongated structures in the corona will extend out horizontally with both sides fairly balanced. See the bottom coronagraph from 1996. At solar minimum, it's a simple "dipole" field, like a bar magnet's, and aligned with the solar equator. Compare that with the corona in an image from October 3, 2007 -- the structures are angled and unbalanced and they have looked like this for some time. In the absence of almost any sunspots over the past month or more, we still have this strong indicator that we are NOT there yet. Many predictors suggest that we will reach solar minimum sometime between January and March, 2008. So, we'll just have to be patient.
Once again we get to observe solar plasma sliding and zipping along above the edge of the Sun (May 30-31, 2007). With STEREO we are receiving an image every few minutes from each instrument, giving us detailed close-up views of smooth motion. The focal point of this activity was an active region rotating into view when we zoomed in on its action for about 2 days. An active region, an area of intense magnetic forces, is driving a lot of the activity we see. The plasma is being controlled by powerful magnetic forces that guide the material back into the Sun. The frames were taken in extreme ultraviolet light at 304 Angstroms from the Behind spacecraft. In fact, we are viewing ionized helium at about 60,000 degrees C., rising thousands of miles above the Sun's surface. Credit: NASA/STEREO/Naval Research Laboratory
Once again we get to ob...
Image
 
Description
Once again we get to observe solar plasma sliding and zipping along above the edge of the Sun (May 30-31, 2007). With STEREO we are receiving an image every few minutes from each instrument, giving us detailed close-up views of smooth motion. The focal point of this activity was an active region rotating into view when we zoomed in on its action for about 2 days. An active region, an area of intense magnetic forces, is driving a lot of the activity we see. The plasma is being controlled by powerful magnetic forces that guide the material back into the Sun. The frames were taken in extreme ultraviolet light at 304 Angstroms from the Behind spacecraft. In fact, we are viewing ionized helium at about 60,000 degrees C., rising thousands of miles above the Sun's surface. Credit: NASA/STEREO/Naval Research Laboratory
Over a five-day stretch (Nov. 30 - Dec. 4, 2007) SOHO observed two remarkably similar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The first one blew out to the right from the Sun as a familiar arch- shaped, bulbous CME. Just four days later another, slightly larger, CME headed out to the right in just about the same direction and similarly shaped. With the Sun being near its minimum period of activity, it was a little surprising to see two CMEs in this short a span of time. With the brilliant Sun blocked out by the red occulting disk, we can tease out these features in the corona with our coronagraph instruments. The white circle represents the size of the Sun itself.
Over a five-day stretch...
Image
 
Description
Over a five-day stretch (Nov. 30 - Dec. 4, 2007) SOHO observed two remarkably similar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The first one blew out to the right from the Sun as a familiar arch- shaped, bulbous CME. Just four days later another, slightly larger, CME headed out to the right in just about the same direction and similarly shaped. With the Sun being near its minimum period of activity, it was a little surprising to see two CMEs in this short a span of time. With the brilliant Sun blocked out by the red occulting disk, we can tease out these features in the corona with our coronagraph instruments. The white circle represents the size of the Sun itself.
When the Sun is in its quiet period as it is now, it often presents some very distinctive coronal structures that can be observed with SOHO's coronagraphs. In this still and video clip (September 2-5, 2007) one can see several, well-defined, lighter lines extending out into space. These are shaped by relatively long-lived magnetic features near the Sun's surface that extend out into space. Most solar scientists would call these "streamers." In the video clip you can watch as the fairly disorganized lines resolve themselves into an organized structure over the five days. These lines may remain in place for many more days as well. With the brilliant Sun blocked out by the red occulting disk, we can tease out these features in the corona. The white circle represents the size of the Sun itself. Near solar minimum these features usually extend out from near the equatorial region of the Sun.
When the Sun is in its ...
Image
 
Description
When the Sun is in its quiet period as it is now, it often presents some very distinctive coronal structures that can be observed with SOHO's coronagraphs. In this still and video clip (September 2-5, 2007) one can see several, well-defined, lighter lines extending out into space. These are shaped by relatively long-lived magnetic features near the Sun's surface that extend out into space. Most solar scientists would call these "streamers." In the video clip you can watch as the fairly disorganized lines resolve themselves into an organized structure over the five days. These lines may remain in place for many more days as well. With the brilliant Sun blocked out by the red occulting disk, we can tease out these features in the corona. The white circle represents the size of the Sun itself. Near solar minimum these features usually extend out from near the equatorial region of the Sun.
For the first time we are featuring an observation from one of the STEREO coronagraphs. This COR2 still and video clip (from the Ahead spacecraft) show a modest coronal mass ejection blasting into space over a two-day period (October 4-5, 2007). What is different about these images compared to those of SOHO's coronagraphs? STEREO's COR2 coronagraphs provide images with twice the resolution of SOHO's at about the same frame rate so that finer details are more easily seen. And with one on each of the two STEREO spacecraft, scientists gain a second perspective on the structure and direction of solar events. At this point the two spacecraft are about 35 degrees apart and moving apart at about 44 degrees per year. Its field of view is a middle-range 15 solar radii, compared to 30 solar radii for SOHO's C3 coronagraph and 6 solar radii for SOHO's C2 coronagraph. And STEREO also has a COR1 coronagraph with a field of view of 1.5 to 4 solar radii
For the first time we a...
Image
 
Description
For the first time we are featuring an observation from one of the STEREO coronagraphs. This COR2 still and video clip (from the Ahead spacecraft) show a modest coronal mass ejection blasting into space over a two-day period (October 4-5, 2007). What is different about these images compared to those of SOHO's coronagraphs? STEREO's COR2 coronagraphs provide images with twice the resolution of SOHO's at about the same frame rate so that finer details are more easily seen. And with one on each of the two STEREO spacecraft, scientists gain a second perspective on the structure and direction of solar events. At this point the two spacecraft are about 35 degrees apart and moving apart at about 44 degrees per year. Its field of view is a middle-range 15 solar radii, compared to 30 solar radii for SOHO's C3 coronagraph and 6 solar radii for SOHO's C2 coronagraph. And STEREO also has a COR1 coronagraph with a field of view of 1.5 to 4 solar radii
Here is one way to demonstrate concretely that STEREO is watching the Sun seven days a week, 24 hours a day. We have put together an entire week's (April 22- 28, 2007) worth of frames into a movie of the Sun in extreme ultraviolet light (304 Angstroms). The frames do not show off any major solar events. The devil, as they say, is in the details and what lovely details are revealed. The Sun's edge can be seen busily erupting with little spicules (vertical spikes), sliding plasma, small prominences loops, and fringe effects. These kinds of finely scaled events were much harder to pick out with SOHO. Why? Because SOHO's frames are only half as big and, thus, provide less resolution. And as for smooth motion, STEREO takes images in several wavelengths every 10 minutes, something that SOHO usually did in another wavelength, rarely in this one. So this is a visual treat that we can expect to see more and more of. Credit: NASA/STEREO/Naval Research Laboratory
Here is one way to demo...
Image
 
Description
Here is one way to demonstrate concretely that STEREO is watching the Sun seven days a week, 24 hours a day. We have put together an entire week's (April 22- 28, 2007) worth of frames into a movie of the Sun in extreme ultraviolet light (304 Angstroms). The frames do not show off any major solar events. The devil, as they say, is in the details and what lovely details are revealed. The Sun's edge can be seen busily erupting with little spicules (vertical spikes), sliding plasma, small prominences loops, and fringe effects. These kinds of finely scaled events were much harder to pick out with SOHO. Why? Because SOHO's frames are only half as big and, thus, provide less resolution. And as for smooth motion, STEREO takes images in several wavelengths every 10 minutes, something that SOHO usually did in another wavelength, rarely in this one. So this is a visual treat that we can expect to see more and more of. Credit: NASA/STEREO/Naval Research Laboratory
Over a four-day period (July 7-11, 2007) of watching the Sun's atmosphere with SOHO's C2 coronagraph, we observed a sputtering outflow of particles from an active region. Although none of the distinct outbursts were particulary strong, at least six to eight clouds of particles were thrust into space. The rest of the time was generally marked by recurrent flows or a streaming of charged particles. That active region has since lost much of its energy and is much quieter than it was. The white circle represents the size of the Sun, which is covered by an occulting disk (solid red in this image) so that we can see the faint features of the activity in the Sun's corona.
Over a four-day period ...
Image
 
Description
Over a four-day period (July 7-11, 2007) of watching the Sun's atmosphere with SOHO's C2 coronagraph, we observed a sputtering outflow of particles from an active region. Although none of the distinct outbursts were particulary strong, at least six to eight clouds of particles were thrust into space. The rest of the time was generally marked by recurrent flows or a streaming of charged particles. That active region has since lost much of its energy and is much quieter than it was. The white circle represents the size of the Sun, which is covered by an occulting disk (solid red in this image) so that we can see the faint features of the activity in the Sun's corona.
This week SOHO observed sunspot 944 coming around the Sun's eastern limb--for the fifth time! Usually sunspots form and dissolve in a matter of days or weeks, but this spot has real longevity-it has survived for an unusually long five solar rotations. Here we put side-by-side images at almost exactly three of the five rotations. The Sun rotates about once every 27 days. A sunspot receives a new number each time it reappears, so three months ago this was called Sunspot 930 when it blasted out a strong solar flare, one of the strongest in 25 years. Few months ago it was called Sunspot 923. Though the numbers have changed, the spot remains true to its character: a source of magnetic intensity rising from beneath the Sun's surface. Now, though, it is a mere shadow of its former self and poses no threat for such activity.
This week SOHO observed...
Image
 
Description
This week SOHO observed sunspot 944 coming around the Sun's eastern limb--for the fifth time! Usually sunspots form and dissolve in a matter of days or weeks, but this spot has real longevity-it has survived for an unusually long five solar rotations. Here we put side-by-side images at almost exactly three of the five rotations. The Sun rotates about once every 27 days. A sunspot receives a new number each time it reappears, so three months ago this was called Sunspot 930 when it blasted out a strong solar flare, one of the strongest in 25 years. Few months ago it was called Sunspot 923. Though the numbers have changed, the spot remains true to its character: a source of magnetic intensity rising from beneath the Sun's surface. Now, though, it is a mere shadow of its former self and poses no threat for such activity.
For the ninth day in a row (as of April 12, 2007), the Sun has appeared spotless. No sunspots, Zip. We really are in the midst of solar minimum when the Sun's activity level in its 11 year cycle is at its lowest. Dr. Tony Phillips (of spaceweather.com [ http://spaceweather.com/ ]) recalled that during the last solar minimum in 1996 the Sun was spotless for 37 days! So at this point we are still far from those tedious doldrums. Sunspot watchers are getting antsy, but what are you going to do? When there are no sunspots, then it usually follows that there are no solar storms. Over the past few weeks that has proven generally to be the case as well. Better find a good book to read - it's a waiting game for now!
For the ninth day in a ...<a target="_blank" href="http://spaceweather.com/"></a>
Image
 
Description
For the ninth day in a row (as of April 12, 2007), the Sun has appeared spotless. No sunspots, Zip. We really are in the midst of solar minimum when the Sun's activity level in its 11 year cycle is at its lowest. Dr. Tony Phillips (of spaceweather.com [ http://spaceweather.com/ ]) recalled that during the last solar minimum in 1996 the Sun was spotless for 37 days! So at this point we are still far from those tedious doldrums. Sunspot watchers are getting antsy, but what are you going to do? When there are no sunspots, then it usually follows that there are no solar storms. Over the past few weeks that has proven generally to be the case as well. Better find a good book to read - it's a waiting game for now!
One of the STEREO spacecraft (Ahead) caught an enourmous wave as it rippled across the most of the Sun (Dec. 7, 2007). While the visual effect is subtle when observed in at extreme UV wavelengths, (especially in any still image) there is nothing subtle about the roughly 500,000 miles it traverses at a speed of 500-1500 km/s in a just few hours or the amount of energy it carries. This event was likely triggered by a small flare and CME from Active Region 977. Scientists believe this is the most substantial wave of this type observed by STEREO.
One of the STEREO space...
Image
 
Description
One of the STEREO spacecraft (Ahead) caught an enourmous wave as it rippled across the most of the Sun (Dec. 7, 2007). While the visual effect is subtle when observed in at extreme UV wavelengths, (especially in any still image) there is nothing subtle about the roughly 500,000 miles it traverses at a speed of 500-1500 km/s in a just few hours or the amount of energy it carries. This event was likely triggered by a small flare and CME from Active Region 977. Scientists believe this is the most substantial wave of this type observed by STEREO.
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