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Travelmate Bear with SR...
Mar 1996
 
The NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF) was built in 1983 and is part of the Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards AFB, Edwards, California. The FVF is a convenient, inexpensive tool that provides a means by which complex flow fields can be observed. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a time- and cost-effective flow diagnostic tool. Since the start of its operation, the FVF's primary use has been to study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations. Because of the low Reynolds numbers obtainable in a water tunnel, it is best used to investigate flow regimes where the vortex flow is dominant over viscous flow effects. Ideally, a water tunnel is best used in the infant stages of aircraft development. Potential problems can be identified and a variety of fixes may be implemented before a substantially more expensive wind tunnel model is built and tested. Flow visualization in a water tunnel, however, is useful at any stage of aircraft development. Observation of the flow is a good first step toward providing physical explanations for anomalies or phenomena discovered during wind tunnel or flight tests. Once the causes are understood, possible configuration modifications can easily be investigated. The Dryden FVF is a convenient and inexpensive tool that can provide a qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, description of complex fluid phenomena. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a flow diagnostic tool. The visualization and interpretation of complicated fluid motions around isolated vehicle components and complete configurations in a time- and cost-effective manner can be key elements in the development of flow control concepts.
Water Tunnel with an SR...
January 30, 1996
 
Description The NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF) was built in 1983 and is part of the Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards AFB, Edwards, California. The FVF is a convenient, inexpensive tool that provides a means by which complex flow fields can be observed. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a time- and cost-effective flow diagnostic tool. Since the start of its operation, the FVF's primary use has been to study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations. Because of the low Reynolds numbers obtainable in a water tunnel, it is best used to investigate flow regimes where the vortex flow is dominant over viscous flow effects. Ideally, a water tunnel is best used in the infant stages of aircraft development. Potential problems can be identified and a variety of fixes may be implemented before a substantially more expensive wind tunnel model is built and tested. Flow visualization in a water tunnel, however, is useful at any stage of aircraft development. Observation of the flow is a good first step toward providing physical explanations for anomalies or phenomena discovered during wind tunnel or flight tests. Once the causes are understood, possible configuration modifications can easily be investigated. The Dryden FVF is a convenient and inexpensive tool that can provide a qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, description of complex fluid phenomena. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a flow diagnostic tool. The visualization and interpretation of complicated fluid motions around isolated vehicle components and complete configurations in a time- and cost-effective manner can be key elements in the development of flow control concepts.
A collection of NASA's research aircraft on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center in July 1997: X-31, F-15 ACTIVE, SR-71, F-106, F-16XL Ship #2, X-38, Radio Controlled Mothership and X-36.
Dryden 1997 Research Ai...
July 16, 1997
 
Description A collection of NASA's research aircraft on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center in July 1997: X-31, F-15 ACTIVE, SR-71, F-106, F-16XL Ship #2, X-38, Radio Controlled Mothership and X-36.
The NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF) was built in 1983 and is part of the Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards AFB, Edwards, California. The FVF is a convenient, inexpensive tool that provides a means by which complex flow fields can be observed. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a time- and cost-effective flow diagnostic tool. Since the start of its operation, the FVF's primary use has been to study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations. Because of the low Reynolds numbers obtainable in a water tunnel, it is best used to investigate flow regimes where the vortex flow is dominant over viscous flow effects. Ideally, a water tunnel is best used in the infant stages of aircraft development. Potential problems can be identified and a variety of fixes may be implemented before a substantially more expensive wind tunnel model is built and tested. Flow visualization in a water tunnel, however, is useful at any stage of aircraft development. Observation of the flow is a good first step toward providing physical explanations for anomalies or phenomena discovered during wind tunnel or flight tests. Once the causes are understood, possible configuration modifications can easily be investigated. The Dryden FVF is a convenient and inexpensive tool that can provide a qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, description of complex fluid phenomena. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a flow diagnostic tool. The visualization and interpretation of complicated fluid motions around isolated vehicle components and complete configurations in a time- and cost-effective manner can be key elements in the development of flow control concepts.
Water Tunnel preparatio...
January 30, 1996
 
Description The NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (FVF) was built in 1983 and is part of the Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards AFB, Edwards, California. The FVF is a convenient, inexpensive tool that provides a means by which complex flow fields can be observed. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a time- and cost-effective flow diagnostic tool. Since the start of its operation, the FVF's primary use has been to study highly complex 3-dimensional vortex flow on aircraft configurations. Because of the low Reynolds numbers obtainable in a water tunnel, it is best used to investigate flow regimes where the vortex flow is dominant over viscous flow effects. Ideally, a water tunnel is best used in the infant stages of aircraft development. Potential problems can be identified and a variety of fixes may be implemented before a substantially more expensive wind tunnel model is built and tested. Flow visualization in a water tunnel, however, is useful at any stage of aircraft development. Observation of the flow is a good first step toward providing physical explanations for anomalies or phenomena discovered during wind tunnel or flight tests. Once the causes are understood, possible configuration modifications can easily be investigated. The Dryden FVF is a convenient and inexpensive tool that can provide a qualitative, and sometimes quantitative, description of complex fluid phenomena. As the designs of advanced technology vehicles become more complex, water tunnels have become increasingly useful as a flow diagnostic tool. The visualization and interpretation of complicated fluid motions around isolated vehicle components and complete configurations in a time- and cost-effective manner can be key elements in the development of flow control concepts.
LASRE pod being mated t...
The addition of the Lin...
15 Feb 1996
 
SR-71 Pilot Stephen (St...
NASA research pilot Ste...
1992
 
SR-71 Pilots and Crew (...
The two pilot-engineer ...
Novmber 1991
 
SR-71 on Ramp with Flig...
Looking more like astro...
1991
 
SR-71 Pilots and Crew (...
The two pilot-engineer ...
November 1991
 
SR-71 in Flight over Mo...
The streamlined profile...
September 1992
 
SR-71 Ship #1 on Ramp
This photo shows a head...
1994
 
SR-71 Takeoff with Afte...
Shock waves stream from...
1992
 
SR-71 Ship #1 on Ramp
This look-down view of ...
April 1994
 
SR-71 in Flight over Ro...
This photo shows NASA D...
July 1995
 
SR-71 - Taxi on Ramp wi...
This photo shows a head...
1995
 
SR-71 - In-flight Close...
This extreme close-up o...
December 1994
 
LASRE pod being mated t...
This is a head-on view ...
15 Feb 1996
 
SR-71 Tail #844 Landing...
With distinctive heat w...
1996
 
LASRE pod being mated t...
This is a rear/side vie...
15 Feb 1996
 
SR-71 wind tunnel scale...
This is a photo of the ...
15 Feb. 1996
 
LASRE pod being mated t...
These workers are perfo...
15 Feb 1996
 
LASRE pod being mated t...
This Feb. 15, 1996 phot...
15 Feb 1996
 
SR-71 #844 with LASRE p...
The Linear Aerospike SR...
Aug 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
The NASA SR-71A success...
March 4, 1998
 
SR-71 with LASRE pod pa...
A NASA SR-71A with the ...
Aug 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
This photograph shows t...
4 Mar 1998
 
SR-71 being towed to ha...
NASA's SR-71 is being t...
Aug 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 made its s...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 refuels wi...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 made its s...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
This photograph shows t...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 takes off ...
October 31, 1997
 
LASRE pod being mated t...
The Linear Aerospike SR...
Aug 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 successful...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
A NASA SR-71 successful...
October 31, 1997
 
Linear Aerospike SR-71 ...
This photograph shows a...
February 12, 1998
 
SR-71 Pilot Rogers E. S...
Research pilot Rogers E...
1992
 
SR-71 on Ramp
NASA's SR-71A, used for...
1990
 
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