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Browse All : SuitSat

1-13 of 13
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-16907 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth?s horizon, a spacesuit-turned-satellite called SuitSat began its orbit around the Earth after it was released by the Expedition 12 crewmembers during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 3, 2006. SuitSat, an unneeded Russian Orlan spacesuit, was outfitted by the crew with three batteries, internal sensors and a radio transmitter, which faintly transmitted recorded voices of school children to amateur radio operators worldwide. The suit will enter the atmosphere and burn up in a few weeks.
International Space Sta...
2006-01-26 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-15664 (24 Jan. 2006) --- An old Russian Orlan spacesuit is photographed in the Unity node of the International Space Station, which will be released by hand from the space station during a spacewalk Feb. 3, 2006. Outfitted with a special radio transmitter and other gear, the spacesuit comprises a Russian experiment called SuitSat. It will fly free from the station as a satellite in orbit for several weeks of scientific research and radio tracking, including communications by amateur radio operators. Eventually, it will enter the atmosphere and be destroyed.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-16905 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth?s horizon, a spacesuit-turned-satellite called SuitSat began its orbit around the Earth after it was released by the Expedition 12 crewmembers during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 3, 2006. SuitSat, an unneeded Russian Orlan spacesuit, was outfitted by the crew with three batteries, internal sensors and a radio transmitter, which faintly transmitted recorded voices of school children to amateur radio operators worldwide. The suit will enter the atmosphere and burn up in a few weeks.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-17057 (24 Jan. 2006) --- In the Unity node of the International Space Station, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, puts finishing touches on an old Russian Orlan spacesuit that will be released by hand from the space station during a spacewalk Feb. 3, 2006. Outfitted with a special radio transmitter and other gear, the spacesuit comprises a Russian experiment called SuitSat. It will fly free from the station as a satellite in orbit for several weeks of scientific research and radio tracking, including communications by amateur radio operators. Eventually, it will enter the atmosphere and be destroyed.
International Space Sta...
2006-01-26 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-15655 (24 Jan. 2006) --- In the Unity node of the International Space Station, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, puts finishing touches on an old Russian Orlan spacesuit that will be released by hand from the space station during a spacewalk Feb. 3, 2006. Outfitted with a special radio transmitter and other gear, the spacesuit comprises a Russian experiment called SuitSat. It will fly free from the station as a satellite in orbit for several weeks of scientific research and radio tracking, including communications by amateur radio operators. Eventually, it will enter the atmosphere and be destroyed.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-16908 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth?s horizon, a spacesuit-turned-satellite called SuitSat began its orbit around the Earth after it was released by the Expedition 12 crewmembers during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 3, 2006. SuitSat, an unneeded Russian Orlan spacesuit, was outfitted by the crew with three batteries, internal sensors and a radio transmitter, which faintly transmitted recorded voices of school children to amateur radio operators worldwide. The suit will enter the atmosphere and burn up in a few weeks.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-17050 (24 Jan. 2006) --- Cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, assembles the antenna kit for the Radioskaf (SuitSat) payload in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2006-01-26 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-15652 (24 Jan. 2006) --- In the Unity node of the International Space Station, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, puts finishing touches on an old Russian Orlan spacesuit that will be released by hand from the space station during a spacewalk Feb. 3, 2006. Outfitted with a special radio transmitter and other gear, the spacesuit comprises a Russian experiment called SuitSat. It will fly free from the station as a satellite in orbit for several weeks of scientific research and radio tracking, including communications by amateur radio operators. Eventually, it will enter the atmosphere and be destroyed.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-17036 (23 Jan. 2006) --- Astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur (foreground), Expedition 12 commander and NASA space station science officer, and cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, watch the contents of a compact disk at a work station in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. The compact disk was in the Radioskaf (SuitSat) package delivered to the station by a Progress spacecraft.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-17025 (23 Jan. 2006) --- Cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev (left), Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, and astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur, commander and NASA space station science officer, unpack the Radioskaf (SuitSat) package sent up on a Progress spacecraft. It contained instructions and a compact disk that included items such as artwork and photos from different schools.
International Space Sta...
2006-01-26 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-15666 (24 Jan. 2006) --- An old Russian Orlan spacesuit is photographed in the Unity node of the International Space Station, which will be released by hand from the space station during a spacewalk Feb. 3, 2006. Outfitted with a special radio transmitter and other gear, the spacesuit comprises a Russian experiment called SuitSat. It will fly free from the station as a satellite in orbit for several weeks of scientific research and radio tracking, including communications by amateur radio operators. Eventually, it will enter the atmosphere and be destroyed.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-16898 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, participates in the second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) performed by the Expedition 12 crew during their six-month mission. During the five-hour, 43-minute spacewalk, Tokarev and astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur (out of frame), commander and NASA space station science officer, released SuitSat, conducted preventative maintenance to a cable-cutting device, retrieved experiments and photographed the station?s exterior.
International Space Sta...
2006-09-08 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-24449 (3 Feb. 2006) --- Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, a spacesuit-turned-satellite called SuitSat began its orbit around the Earth after being released by the Expedition 12 crewmembers during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Feb. 3, 2006. SuitSat, an unneeded Russian Orlan spacesuit, was outfitted by the crew with three batteries, internal sensors and a radio transmitter, which faintly transmitted recorded voices of school children to amateur radio operators worldwide. The suit will enter the atmosphere and burn up in a few weeks.
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