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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sitting in the entrance to the orbiter Atlantis are (left to right) STS-98 Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins and Commander Ken Cockrell. Below them is the mission patch just placed there by Cockrell. Standing at left is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and at right Pilot Mark Polansky. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 , an overhead crane lifts the crate covering the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The spacecraft, which arrived from Denver, Colo., Jan. 4, will undergo final assembly and checkout. That includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II launch vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS, is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a media briefing at Launch Pad 39A, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (second from right) describes how the robotic arm will lift the payload from the orbiter?s bay and maneuver it into position for attachment to the International Space Station. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell answers a question from the media during a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Other crew members present are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, [Cockrell], and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Four members of the STS-98 crew pose for a photo at Launch Pad 39A. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Thomas Jones. Not pictured is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA -- After a media briefing at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-98 crew poses in the slidewire basket landing zone. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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The STS-98 crew listens to instructions on use of the slidewire basket, part of emergency egress equipment from the launch pad. At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure are Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins waits in the White Room outside the entrance into Atlantis. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. The other crew members are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2)secure an overhead crane to the crate containing the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The spacecraft will undergo final assembly and checkout, which includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II launch vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS, is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
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At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, the STS-98 crew watches a slidewire basket drop to the landing zone. The basket was released by Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (center); Pilot Mark Polansky is at left. The basket is part of emergency egress equipment from the launch pad. Others (not shown) taking part in the emergency egress training are Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell places the mission patch on the entrance to the orbiter Atlantis. He and the rest of the crew Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Thomas Jones, Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam are t KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A humorous question from the media (out of view) produces smiles among the STS-98 crew during a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones (with microphone), Commander Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew talks to the press at a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Holding the microphone is Commander Ken Cockrell, who answers a question about the mission. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, [Cockrell], and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers place a protective barrier around the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. Odyssey will undergo final assembly and checkout in the SAEf-2, which includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Odyssey, which arrived from Denver, Colo., Jan. 4, will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS. Launch is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
In the Spacecraft Assem...
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In the White Room, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones gets help with his launch and entry suit before entering Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
In the White Room, STS-...
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In the White Room, members of the closeout crew help STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (center) with her launch and entry suit before she enters Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 move the shipping crate away from the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, at left on the stand. Odyssey is still covered by a protective sheet. The spacecraft, which arrived from Denver, Colo., Jan. 4, will undergo final assembly and checkout in the SAEF-2. That includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II launch vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS, is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
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In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers remove the protective sheet from around the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. Odyssey, which arrived from Denver, Colo., Jan. 4, will undergo final assembly and checkout in the SAEF-2. That includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II launch vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS, is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
In the Spacecraft Assem...
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In the White Room, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky gets help with his launch and entry suit before entering Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
In the White Room, STS-...
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In the White Room at Launch Pad 39A, STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell (center) gets help from the closeout crew with his launch and entry suit before entering Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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In the White Room, STS-98 Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins pose for a photo before entering Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
In the White Room, STS-...
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In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft sits on a workstand, ready for final assembly and checkout. That includes installation of two of the three science instruments, integration of the three-panel solar array, and a spacecraft functional test. Odyssey, which arrived from Denver, Colo., Jan. 4, will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II vehicle from Pad A, Complex 17, CCAFS. Launch is planned for April 7, 2001 the first day of a 21-day planetary window. The spacecraft will arrive at Mars on Oct. 20, 2001, for insertion into an initial elliptical capture orbit. Its final operational altitude will be a 250-mile-high, Sun-synchronous polar orbit. Mars Odyssey will spend two years mapping the planet?s surface and measuring its environment
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The closeout crew in the White Room pose with two of the STS-98 crew. Kneeling in front is United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician George Schramm. Standing, left to right, are USA Mechanical Technician Vinny Difranzo, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Ken Strite, Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins, and USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is getting ready to enter Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
The closeout crew in th...
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Before entering Atlantis from the White Room for a simulated launch countdown, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky (left) poses with Travis Thompson, who is the orbiter vehicle closeout chief. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. Thompson is with United Space Alliance. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
Before entering Atlanti...
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The 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter is safely placed on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
The 2001 Mars Odyssey O...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo has the attention of workers and some of the STS-102 crew. The MPLM, part of the payload on the STS-102 mission, is the first of three pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched in early March. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew of STS-102, plus Expedition Two astronauts, poses in front of Leonardo, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module that will fly on the mission. From left are Susan Helms and James Voss, part of Expedition Two; Mission Specialists Paul W. Richards and Andrew S.W. Thomas; Pilot James M. Kelly; and Commander James D. Wetherbee. Not shown is cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is also part of Expedition Two. The MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. Leonardo will be launched March 1, 2001, on Shuttle mission STS-102. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo has the attention of workers and some of the STS-102 crew. The MPLM, part of the payload on the STS-102 mission, is the first of three pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched in early March. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter [ http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/ ] to a workstand (left). The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
In the Spacecraft Assem...<a target="_blank" href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/"></a>
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo has the attention of workers and some of the STS-102 crew. The MPLM, part of the payload on the STS-102 mission, is the first of three pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched in early March. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter [ http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/ ]is lifted from a platform by an overhead crane while workers help guide it. The Odyssey is being moved to a workstand in the SAEF-2. The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
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The 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter comes to rest on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. Workers check the spacecraft?s position. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
The 2001 Mars Odyssey O...
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In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter as it is lowered to a workstand. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
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In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check the movement of the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter [ http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/ ] as it is carried to the workstand at right. The circular object facing forward on the spacecraft is a high-gain antenna. On the right side is the rectangular solar array assembly. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
In the Spacecraft Assem...<a target="_blank" href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/"></a>
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a discussion with a worker inside Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, STS-102 Mission Specialist Andrew S.W. Thomas (left) reviews paperwork, while Expedition Two member James S. Voss (center) listens. The MPLM, part of the payload on the STS-102 mission, is the first of three pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. STS-102 is scheduled for launch March 1, 2001. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-102 Mission Specialist Andrew S.W. Thomas (center), and Expedition Two astronaut James S. Voss (right) talk with two workers inside Leonardo, one of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules in the Space Station Processing Facility. The MPLM, part of the payload on the STS-102 mission, is the first of three pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station?s ?moving vans,? carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. STS-102 is scheduled to be launched in early March. On that flight, Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module Destiny. The mission will also be carrying the Expedition Two crew to the Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew who will return on Shuttle Discovery
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking at the inside of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo are (left to right) Expedition Two astronauts Susan J. Helms and James S. Voss. They will be flying on STS-102 to the International Space Station, replacing the Expedition One crew, who will return to Earth on the Shuttle. Leonardo is part of the payload on STS-102 and will carry laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. STS-102 is scheduled to be launched in early March 2001
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the slidewire basket landing zone at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-98 crew gathers for a media briefing. With the microphone is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, who is talking about some of his activities during the mission. The others are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. The landing zone provides an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew (right) gathers at Launch Pad 39A for a media briefing before continuing their emergency egress training. Facing an audience (left) of photographers, videographers and writers, along with KSC media escorts, are (left to right) Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins, Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones and Pilot Mark Polansky. They are standing in the landing zone for the slidewire baskets that provide an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew gathers at Launch Pad 39A for a media briefing before continuing their emergency egress training. Facing an audience (foreground) of photographers, videographers and writers are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. In the background is the Fixed Service Structure with its 80-foot lightning mast on top. The Space Shuttle is hidden behind it. The crew is standing in the landing zone for the slidewire baskets that provide an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew talks to the press at a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. With the microphone is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins, who discusses her role in the mission using the robotic arm to move the payload into position. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (far right). They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew talks to the press at a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. With the microphone is Commander Ken Cockrell, who discusses the EVAs on the mission. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, [Cockrell], and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
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