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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The tugboat towing the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, passes through a drawbridge on its voyage to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tugboat tows the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, passes cruise ships as it enters Port Canaveral, Fla. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, toward the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A tugboat maneuvers the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, toward the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, moves slowly toward its destination, the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin, propelled by two tugboats. At left in the background is Launch Pad 39A. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Delta Operations Center, Jack Reynolds and Leslie Guzman (background) and other workers attach the nozzle for the RL-10 engine to the second stage of the Boeing Delta IV rocket. The Delta IV is the launch vehicle for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-N), scheduled to launch in April 2005 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-N is a weather satellite for NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P, the GOES-N will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric ?triggers? of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Delta Operations Center, Jack Reynolds and Leslie Guzman (both at left), with Pratt & Whitney, prepare the nozzle for the RL-10 engine to be attached to the second stage of the Boeing Delta IV rocket. The Delta IV is the launch vehicle for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-N), scheduled to launch in April 2005 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-N is a weather satellite for NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P, the GOES-N will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric ?triggers? of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Delta Operations Center, Jack Reynolds and Leslie Guzman (left and right), with Pratt & Whitney, closely guide the nozzle for the RL-10 engine on the second stage of the Boeing Delta IV rocket. The Delta IV is the launch vehicle for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-N), scheduled to launch in April 2005 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-N is a weather satellite for NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P, the GOES-N will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric ?triggers? of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, is finally docked at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Delta Operations Center, Leslie Guzman (yellow shirt), with Pratt & Whitney, watches closely as the nozzle for the RL-10 engine is lifted into place on the second stage of the Boeing Delta IV rocket. The Delta IV is the launch vehicle for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-N), scheduled to launch in April 2005 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-N is a weather satellite for NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P, the GOES-N will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric ?triggers? of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Tugboats maneuver the barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank (ET), designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, closer to the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin. The ET can be seen inside the barge. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, moves slowly toward its destination, the dock at the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin, propelled by two tugboats. At left in the background is Launch Pad 39A. The External Tank arrived safely early this morning at Port Canaveral, Fla., after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea. It departed from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Dec. 31 and was transported on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, pulled by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At the port, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey to the Turn Basin. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The barge carrying the newly redesigned External Tank, designated for use on Return to Flight mission STS-114, is towed toward the Launch Complex 39 Area Turn Basin at Kennedy. At left is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The barge arrived after an approximately 900-mile journey at sea from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. It left the facility Dec. 31 on the Pegasus, NASA?s specially designed barge, towed by Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ship Liberty Star. At Port Canaveral, the barge was then hooked up to the tugs for the last part of the journey. Next, the External Tank will be off-loaded from the barge and transported to the Vehicle Assembly Building for its final checkout and mating to the twin Solid Rocket Boosters and orbiter Discovery. NASA and Lockheed Martin Corp. spent nearly two years modifying the 15-story, bronze-colored tank to make it safer for liftoff. Among dozens of changes is a redesigned forward bipod fitting -- a design that meets the recommendation of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to reduce the risk to the Space Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. STS-114 is targeted for a launch opportunity beginning in May. The seven-member Discovery crew will fly to the International Space Station primarily to test and evaluate new procedures for flight safety, including Space Shuttle inspection and repair techniques.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Delta Operations Center, Jack Reynolds and Leslie Guzman (left and right), with Pratt & Whitney, closely guide the nozzle for the RL-10 engine on the second stage of the Boeing Delta IV rocket. The Delta IV is the launch vehicle for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-N), scheduled to launch in April 2005 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. GOES-N is a weather satellite for NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The first in a series of three advanced weather satellites including GOES-O and GOES-P, the GOES-N will provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It will provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric ?triggers? of severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, GOES-N will be able to monitor storm development and track their movements.
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JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, TEXAS -- JSC2005-E-20603 -- Official portrait of astronaut Mark E. Kelly, pilot.
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