REFINE 

Browse All : Images from 01-07-1999

1-11 of 11
A Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., assists with an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the GOES-L [ http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm ] weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite
A Loral worker at Astro...<a target="_blank" href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm"></a>
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the GOES-L [ http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm ] weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite
During an illumination ...<a target="_blank" href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm"></a>
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., perform an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the GOES-L [ http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm ] weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite
Loral workers at Astrot...<a target="_blank" href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm"></a>
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
A fourth and final Solid Rocket Booster, to be mated with a Boeing Delta II rocket, starts its lift up the tower at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The rocket will carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999
A fourth and final Soli...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Boeing Delta II rocket waits with its four solid rocket boosters for final preparations to launch the Stardust satellite on Feb. 6, 1999. The rocket will carry Stardust into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
At Pad 17A, Cape Canave...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
Workers (right) at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., arrange the lights for an illumination test on the solar panel of the GOES-L [ http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm ] weather satellite. The test is verifying the circuitry on the panel. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite
Workers (right) at Astr...<a target="_blank" href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm"></a>
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
A Boeing Delta II rocket sits on Launch Pad 17A (left), Cape Canaveral Air Station, before mating with its final Solid Rocket Booster, in the tower at right. In the background is Pad 17B with its two launch tower components. The Delta II rocket will carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999
A Boeing Delta II rocke...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers keep watch on the placement of the fourth and final solid rocket booster (SRB) being mated with the Boeing Delta II rocket. The rocket will be aided by four SRBs to carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999
At Pad 17A, Cape Canave...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
A fourth and final Solid Rocket Booster arrives at Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station to be mated with a Boeing Delta II rocket. The rocket will carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999
A fourth and final Soli...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a fourth and final solid rocket booster (SRB) (right) is moved from the mobile tower by a crane before mating with the Delta II rocket (left). The rocket will be aided by four SRBs to carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999
At Pad 17A, Cape Canave...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the GOES-L [ http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm ] weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite
During an illumination ...<a target="_blank" href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm"></a>
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
1-11 of 11