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Browse All : Images from 01-07-2005

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Deep Impact spacecraft waits inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., for fairing installation. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Nearly vertical, the redesigned External Tank will be lifted into the "checkout cell" of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach talks to STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins as they watch the newly redesigned External Tank being lifted in the Vehicle Assembly Building to a ?checkout cell? where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. Collins and the rest of the crew are at Kennedy to observe tank activities. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank is designated to fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mission STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins and Sen. Bill Nelson watch as the newly redesigned External Tank is lifted in the Vehicle Assembly Building to a ?checkout cell? where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The mission crew and Nelson are at Kennedy to observe tank activities. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank is designated to fly with Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., the first half of the fairing is moved into place around the Deep Impact spacecraft. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the redesigned External Tank is seen being lifted to the top where it will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence listens to Space Shuttle Program Manager Bill Parsons while they are in the Vehicle Assembly Building observing the newly redesigned External Tank being lifted to a ?checkout cell? where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. Crew members are at Kennedy to observe tank activities. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank is designated to fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is raised above its transporter in the Vehicle Assembly Building. It will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Deep Impact spacecraft waits inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., for fairing installation. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., the partly enclosed Deep Impact spacecraft (background) waits while the second half of the fairing (foreground left) moves toward it. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is being raised to a vertical position in the Vehicle Assembly Building and will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Raised to a vertical position in the Vehicle Assembly Building, the redesigned External Tank will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Charles Camarda (left) and Pilot James Kelly look at the new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System while in space. Crew members are at Kennedy to become familiar with Shuttle equipment such as the OBSS and the newly redesigned External Tank. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins talks to reporters before she and the rest of the crew depart Kennedy Space Center. The crew was at KSC to observe the newly redesigned External Tank and new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Among redesign changes on the ET is the forward bipod fitting to reduce the risk to the Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. A camera has also been added to capture separation of the ET from the Shuttle after launch. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm and equips the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The launch window for Return to Flight mission STS-114 is May 12 to June 3, 2005. (Photo: Michael R. Brown)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Deep Impact spacecraft waits inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., for fairing installation. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas talks with Rafael Rodriguez, an advance systems technician with United Space Alliance, about the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) in front of them. The OBSS will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., the first half of the fairing is moved into place around the Deep Impact spacecraft. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is being raised to a vertical position in the Vehicle Assembly Building and will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank's mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sen. Bill Nelson and STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins watch the newly redesigned External Tank being lifted in the Vehicle Assembly Building to a ?checkout cell? where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. Crew members are at Kennedy to observe tank activities. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank is designated to fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is being raised off its transporter. It will be lifted to a vertical position and into the "checkout cell" of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi talks to a reporter before he and the rest of the crew depart Kennedy Space Center. Noguchi is with the Japanese Space Agency. The crew was at KSC to observe the newly redesigned External Tank and new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Among redesign changes on the ET is the forward bipod fitting to reduce the risk to the Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. A camera has also been added to capture separation of the ET from the Shuttle after launch. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm and equips the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The launch window for Return to Flight mission STS-114 is May 12 to June 3, 2005. (Photo: Michael R. Brown)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, the redesigned External Tank is being lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from the floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the redesigned External Tank is seen being lifted to the top where it will be lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Charles Camarda gets a close look at the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. Seated is Rafael Rodriguez, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is being raised off its transporter. It will be lifted to a vertical position and into the "checkout cell" of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence and Pilot James Kelly look at the new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System while in space. Crew members are at Kennedy to become familiar with Shuttle equipment such as the OBSS and the newly redesigned External Tank. The launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Viewed from an upper level in the Vehicle Assembly Building, the redesigned External Tank is being lifted into the "checkout cell" where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins talks to reporters before the crew departs Kennedy Space Center. Behind Collins are, left to right, Mission Specialists Wendy Lawrence, Andrew Thomas, Stephen Robinson, Charles Camardo and Sochi Noguchi, and Pilot James Kelly. Noguchi is with the Japanese Space Agency. The crew was at KSC to observe the newly redesigned External Tank and new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Among redesign changes on the ET is the forward bipod fitting to reduce the risk to the Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. A camera has also been added to capture separation of the ET from the Shuttle after launch. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm and equips the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The launch window for Return to Flight mission STS-114 is May 12 to June 3, 2005. (Photo: Michael R. Brown)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is ready to be raised to a vertical position and lifted into the "checkout cell" of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., workers attach the two halves of the fairing around the Deep Impact spacecraft. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The redesigned External Tank is being raised off its transporter. It will be lifted to a vertical position and into the "checkout cell" of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the tank?s mechanical, electrical and thermal protection systems are inspected. The tank will also undergo new processes resulting from its redesign, including inspection of the bipod heater and External Tank separation camera. The tank will be prepared for "mating" to the Shuttle?s Solid Rocket Boosters. When preparations are complete, the tank will be lifted from the checkout cell, moved across the transfer aisle and into High Bay 1. It will be lowered and attached to the boosters, which are sitting on the Mobile Launch Platform. The SRBs and ET will be flying with Shuttle Discovery for the Return to Flight mission STS-114. The launch planning window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Commander Eileen Collins talks with United Space Alliance engineers about the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air force Station, Fla., the first half of the fairing is moved toward the Deep Impact spacecraft for installation. The fairing is a molded structure that fits flush with the outside surface of the Delta II upper stage booster and forms an aerodynamically smooth nosecone, protecting the spacecraft during launch and ascent. Scheduled for liftoff Jan. 12, Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of its interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi (left) and Andrew Thomas (far right) get a close look at about the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. Between them is Rafael Rodriguez, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence talks to reporters before she and other crew members depart Kennedy Space Center. The crew was at KSC to observe the newly redesigned External Tank and new 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS). Among redesign changes on the ET is the forward bipod fitting to reduce the risk to the Shuttle from falling debris during ascent. A camera has also been added to capture separation of the ET from the Shuttle after launch. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttle?s robotic arm and equips the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttle?s Thermal Protection System while in space. The launch window for Return to Flight mission STS-114 is May 12 to June 3, 2005. (Photo: Michael R. Brown)
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