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Browse All : Images from 01-10-2005

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott (left), with United Space Alliance, and Donald Wall (right), with NASA Quality Assurance, closely inspect the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel to be installed on orbiter Discovery?s left wing. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
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JET PROPULSION LABORATORY, CALIF. - At Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo., the infrared (IR) spectrometer for the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft is inspected in the instrument assembly area in the Fisher Assembly building clean room. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. The spectrometer is part of the High Resolution Instrument in the spacecraft. This imager will be aimed at the ejected matter as the crater forms, and an infrared "fingerprint" of the material from inside of the comet's nucleus will be taken. It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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JET PROPULSION LABORATORY, CALIF. - The impactor of the Deep Impact spacecraft, suspended by an overhead crane, undergoes inspection in the Fischer Assembly building at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. The impactor will separate from the flyby spacecraft 24 hours before it impacts the surface of Tempel 1's nucleus. The impactor delivers 19 Gigajoules (that's 4.8 tons of TNT) of kinetic energy to excavate the crater. This kinetic energy is generated by the combination of the mass of the impactor and its velocity when it impacts. To accomplish this feat, the impactor uses a high-precision star tracker, the Impactor Target Sensor (ITS), and Auto-Navigation algorithms developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory to guide it to the target. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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JET PROPULSION LABORATORY, CALIF. - At Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo., a thermal vacuum test is conducted on Deep Impact instruments in the instrument assembly area in the Fisher Assembly building clean room. The High Resolution Instrument (HRI, at right) is one of the largest space-based instruments built specifically for planetary science. It is the main science camera for Deep Impact, providing the highest resolution images via a combined visible camera, an infrared spectrometer and a special imaging module. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Matt Scott, with United Space Alliance, lifts the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel into position for installation on orbiter Discovery?s left wing. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott (upper right), with United Space Alliance, fits the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel on orbiter Discovery?s left wing. Helping to support the panel underneath are Alberto DeLoucas (left) and Mel Romans, with United Space Alliance. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo., the impactor on the Deep Impact spacecraft is tested. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface, Deep Impact?s flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater?s depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. The impactor will separate from the flyby spacecraft 24 hours before it impacts the surface of Tempel 1's nucleus. The impactor delivers 19 Gigajoules (that's 4.8 tons of TNT) of kinetic energy to excavate the crater. This kinetic energy is generated by the combination of the mass of the impactor and its velocity when it impacts. To accomplish this feat, the impactor uses a high-precision star tracker, the Impactor Target Sensor (ITS), and Auto-Navigation algorithms developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory to guide it to the target. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott and Mel Romans (left and right), with United Space Alliance, closely inspect the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel to be installed on orbiter Discovery?s left wing. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mel Romans, with United Space Alliance, prepares the area on orbiter Discovery?s leftwing for installation of the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Matt Scott (upper right), with United Space Alliance, fits the final Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel on orbiter Discovery?s left wing. Helping to support the panel underneath is Alberto DeLoucas, also with United Space Alliance. The leading edges of each of an orbiter?s wings have 22 RCC panels. They are light gray and made entirely of carbon composite material, which protect the orbiter during re-entry. The molded components are approximately 0.25- to 0.5-inch thick and capable of withstanding temperatures up to 3,220 degrees F. Following the Columbia accident in February 2002, which was caused by a breach in an RCC panel that allowed hot gases into the vehicle, each panel on Discovery was removed and thoroughly inspected before final reinstallation. Discovery is the designated orbiter to fly on the Return to Flight mission STS-114, the first Space Shuttle to launch since the accident. The launch window for the mission is May 12 to June 3, 2005.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
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