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An Expanding Bubble in Space
An Expanding Bubble in ...
Deep Space Studies
01/13/2000
NASA
 
NASA Center Hubble Space Telescope Center
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew try on oxygen masks. From left are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) is helped by a suit technician during flight crew equipment fit check prior to her trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
In the Operations and C...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Near the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri check out the slidewire basket used for emergency egress. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 167-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose for a photograph during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri, and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Behind them are visible the top of a solid rocket booster (white) and external tank (orange). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 167-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose for a photograph during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri, and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Behind them (left) are visible the top of a solid rocket booster (white) and external tank (orange). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, gets help from a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building, as part of flight crew equipment fit check, prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
STS-99 Mission Speciali...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level on the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew receive instructions about emergency egress. From left (in uniform) are Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Commander Kevin Kregel. In the background can be seen the Vehicle Assembly Building at left and the waters of Banana Creek in between. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On the Fixed Service Structure at Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency, look over the emergency egress equipment. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
Inside the White Room attached to the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel gets ready to place a sign identifying the mission at the entrance to the orbiter Endeavour. Other crew members gathered around are (left to right) Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri (behind Kregel), and Pilot Dominic Gorie (at right). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
Inside the White Room a...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
At Launch Pad 39A, members of the STS-99 crew and others look over part of the safety equipment. Standing left to right (in uniform) are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
At Launch Pad 39A, memb...
No copyright protection...
NASA
 
Inside the White Room attached to the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose at the entrance to the orbiter Endeavour. From left are Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele, Janice Voss (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri, Commander Kevin Kregel (standing) and Pilot Dominic Gorie (kneeling in front). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
Inside the White Room a...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, gets help from suit technicians during flight crew equipment fit check prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST
In the Operations and C...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-99 crew take time out during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities to talk to the media. From left to right are Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri, and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. ES
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA
 
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