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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Standing in front of one of NASA Kennedy Space Center?s crawler transporters are Rick Drollinger (left) and Phllip Koehring Jr., who both represent their fathers for their roles in the development of the crawlers. The occasion was the 40th anniversary of the crawlers. Drollinger?s father, Richard, was director of engineering at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965. Koehring?s father, Philip Sr., was project manager at Marion. Alongside Koehring are his brothers Doug and John. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens talks to the media and invited guests (behind him) Rick Drollinger (blue shirt), whose father Richard was director of engineering at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965; Philip Koehring Jr. (on right), whose father was project manager at Marion; and Koehring?s sons Doug and John. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, Philip Koehring Jr. (left) meets Bill Clemens. Koehring represented his father, who was project manager at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, Rick Drollinger (center) and John Koehring get a close look at one of the crawlers still in use. Drollinger?s father, Richard, was director of engineering at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965. Koehring is the son of Philip Koehring Sr., who was project manager at Marion. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, three former crawler workers tour one of the crawlers still in use. From the top are Sylvan ?Skip? Montagna, Fred Renaud and Fred Wallace. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Standing in front of one of the crawler transporters at NASA Kennedy Space Center, Director of Space Shuttle Processing Mike Wetmore addresses invited guests (behind him) and the media on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporters. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens stops in front of one of the cabs used to navigate the crawler. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens (right) introduces Philip Koehring Jr., whose father was project manager at the Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Standing in front of one of the crawler transporters at NASA Kennedy Space Center, Director of Space Shuttle Processing Mike Wetmore addresses invited guests (behind him) and the media on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporters. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, retired crawler workers meet for the celebration. At left is Bill Clemens talking with Fred Renaud and his wife, Patricia. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ride on and photograph one of the crawlers up close. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ride on and photograph one of the crawlers up close. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, invited guests mingle in front of one of the crawlers still in use. From left are Sylvan ?Skip? Montagna, Patricia and Fred Renaud, Fred Wallace and Bill Clemens. Philip Koehring and his brothers Doug(white shirt) and John (light blue shirt) and Rick Drollinger are on the right. Philip Koehring Sr. was project manager at the Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965. Drollinger?s father, Richard, was director of engineering at Marion. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center?s launch pads, former crawler driver Fred Renaud gets a close look at one of the crawlers still in use. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room. Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program. In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers move the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The generator will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft encapsulated inside the fairing. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) arrives at the upper level of the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft encapsulated inside the fairing, at left. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) in the foreground has been removed from its caged enclosure. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft encapsulated inside the fairing, at right. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. ? In the Orbital Sciences Building 836 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians complete mating of the three micro-satellites on the payload support structure. The three satellites make up the Space Technology 5 spacecraft, called ST5, and will be launched by a Pegasus XL rocket. The satellites contain miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled for Feb. 28 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is attached to the New Horizons spacecraft inside the fairing. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. ? In the Orbital Sciences Building 836 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the three micro-satellites comprising the Space Technology 5 spacecraft are mated and ready for weighing. ST5 will be launched by a Pegasus XL rocket. The satellites contain miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled for Feb. 28 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BA...
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VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. ? In the Orbital Sciences Building 836 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians complete mating of the three micro-satellites on the payload support structure. The three satellites make up the Space Technology 5 spacecraft, called ST5, and will be launched by a Pegasus XL rocket. The satellites contain miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled for Feb. 28 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BA...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is attached to the New Horizons spacecraft inside the fairing. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. ? In the Orbital Sciences Building 836 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians complete mating of the three micro-satellites on the payload support structure. The three satellites make up the Space Technology 5 spacecraft, called ST5, and will be launched by a Pegasus XL rocket. The satellites contain miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled for Feb. 28 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. ? On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers move the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) into an area of the fairing containing the New Horizons spacecraft, to which it will be attached. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. On Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers on the ground oversee the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) being lifted into the Vertical Integration Facility. The RTG will be installed on the New Horizons spacecraft within the fairing at the top of the Atlas V launch vehicle. Designed and integrated at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., New Horizons will launch on a nine-and-a-half-year voyage to Pluto. Typical of RTG-based systems, as on past outer-planet missions, New Horizons does not have a battery for storing power. At the start of the mission, the RTG, which provides power through the natural radioactive decay of plutonium dioxide fuel, will supply approximately 240 watts (at 30 volts of direct current) - the spacecraft?s shunt regulator unit maintains a steady input from the RTG and dissipates power the spacecraft cannot use at a given time. By July 2015 (the earliest Pluto encounter date) that supply decreases to 200 watts at the same voltage, so New Horizons will ease the strain on its limited power source by cycling science instruments during planetary encounters. New Horizons is scheduled to launch Jan. 17.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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