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SAGE III instrument
SAGE III instrument
Richard Rawls standing ...
01.28.1999
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SAGE III instrument
SAGE III instrument
Richard Rawls and Chip ...
01.28.1999
Image
 
SAGE III instrument
SAGE III instrument
Richard Rawls and Chip ...
01.28.1999
Image
 
Workers at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, connect the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (above), which is already attached to the Stardust spacecraft, with the second stage (below). Stardust, targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6, is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
Workers at Launch Pad 1...
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Workers inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watch as the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is lowered for mating with the second stage below it. The Stardust spacecraft, above it out of sight, is connected to the rocket's third stage. Stardust, targeted for liftoff on Feb. 6, is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
Workers inside the laun...
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Inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers guide the Stardust spacecraft toward an opening to a Boeing Delta II rocket below. The spacecraft is already connected to the third stage of the rocket that will be mated with the second stage in preparation for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
Inside the launch tower...
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At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers watch as the protective canister is lifted from the Stardust spacecraft. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
At Launch Pad 17-A, Cap...
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The protective canister is removed from around the Stardust spacecraft at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
The protective canister...
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At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft, attached to the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket, is lifted up the launch tower. The second and third stages of the rocket will be mated next as preparations continue for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
At Launch Pad 17-A, Cap...
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In the early morning, the Stardust spacecraft, with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket attached, arrives atop a transporter at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The second and third stages of the rocket will be mated and prepared for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
In the early morning, t...
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The KSC-developed X-33 weight simulator (top), known as the "iron bird," is lifted to a vertical position at the X-33 launch site as part of launch equipment testing on Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The simulator matches the 75,000-pound weight and 63-foot height of the X-33 vehicle that will be using the launch equipment. KSC's Vehicle Positioning System (VPS) placed the simulator on the rotating launch platform prior to the rotation. The new VPS will dramatically reduce the amount of manual labor required to position a reusable launch vehicle for liftoff
The KSC-developed X-33 ...
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As part of X-33 launch equipment testing at Edwards Air Force Base, CA, the KSC-developed X-33 weight simulator (top), known as the "iron bird," is lifted to a vertical position at the X-33 launch site. The simulator matches the 75,000-pound weight and 63-foot height of the X-33 vehicle that will be using the launch equipment. KSC's Vehicle Positioning System (VPS) placed the simulator on the rotating launch platform prior to the rotation. The new VPS will dramatically reduce the amount of manual labor required to position a reusable launch vehicle for liftoff
As part of X-33 launch ...
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At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft is revealed after removal of a protective canister. Stardust is targeted for launch on Feb. 6 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. The spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
At Launch Pad 17-A, Cap...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
Workers watch as the protective canister surrounding the Stardust spacecraft is removed at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. Preparations continue for liftoff of the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
Workers watch as the pr...
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The KSC-developed X-33 weight simulator (left), known as the "iron bird," is fully raised to a vertical position at the X-33 launch site as part of launch equipment testing on Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The simulator matches the 75,000-pound weight and 63-foot height of the X-33 vehicle that will be using the launch equipment. KSC's Vehicle Positioning System (VPS) placed the simulator on the rotating launch platform prior to the rotation. The new VPS will dramatically reduce the amount of manual labor required to position a reusable launch vehicle for liftoff
The KSC-developed X-33 ...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
The KSC-developed X-33 weight simulator (top, right), known as the "iron bird," is lifted to a vertical position at the X-33 launch site as part of launch equipment testing on Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The simulator matches the 75,000-pound weight and 63-foot height of the X-33 vehicle that will be using the launch equipment. KSC's Vehicle Positioning System (VPS) placed the simulator on the rotating launch platform prior to the rotation. The new VPS will dramatically reduce the amount of manual labor required to position a reusable launch vehicle for liftoff
The KSC-developed X-33 ...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
Workers inside the launch tower at Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, guide the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket, and the Stardust spacecraft connected to it, through an opening to the second stage of the rocket below. The second and third stages of teh rocket will be mated next as preparations continue for liftoff on Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006
Workers inside the laun...
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