REFINE 

Browse All : Images from 01-30-2007

1-12 of 12
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Russell Romanella, director of the International Space Station/Payload Processing Directorate at Kennedy Space Center, addresses guests and attendees in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay in the ceremony commemorating the bay's transition for use by the Constellation Program. Seated on the dais at right are Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Bill Parsons, Kennedy Space Center director; Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida; and Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a ceremony to commemorate the transition of the historic Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay for use by the Constellation Program, representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida look at the banner, unfurled by Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons (center), spotlighting the Orion crew exploration vehicle that will be assembled in the O&C. From left are Russell Romanella, director of the International Space Station/Payload Processing Directorate at Kennedy Space Center; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Parsons; Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida (turned away); and Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons addresses guests and attendees in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay in the ceremony commemorating the bay's transition for use by the Constellation Program. At right is Russell Romanella, director of the International Space Station/Payload Processing Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. Other representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida also attended. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Employees and guests are seated in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay for the ceremony commemorating the bay's transition for use by the Constellation Program. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A is being moved for the first time in more than a year due to maintenance and upgrades on the pad. Some of the work included sandblasting the structure to remove rust and repainting. In addition, the RSS was jacked up and a new upper-bearing race assembly installed where the RSS pivots against the fixed service structure and a half-inch steel plate added. Pad 39A is being made ready for its first launch in four years, the upcoming STS-117 on March 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A is being moved for the first time in more than a year due to maintenance and upgrades on the pad. Some of the work included sandblasting the structure to remove rust and repainting. In addition, the RSS was jacked up and a new upper-bearing race assembly installed where the RSS pivots against the fixed service structure and a half-inch steel plate added. Pad 39A is being made ready for its first launch in four years, the upcoming STS-117 on March 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers on Launch Pad 39A get ready to begin the movement of the rotating service structure above them. The RSS has not been rotated for more than a year during the maintenance and upgrades on the pad. Some of the work included sandblasting the structure to remove rust and repainting. In addition, the RSS was jacked up and a new upper-bearing race assembly installed where the RSS pivots against the fixed service structure and a half-inch steel plate added. Pad 39A is being made ready for its first launch in four years, the upcoming STS-117 on March 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A has been fully opened for the first time in more than a year due to maintenance and upgrades on the pad. Some of the work included sandblasting the structure to remove rust and repainting. In addition, the RSS was jacked up and a new upper-bearing race assembly installed where the RSS pivots against the fixed service structure and a half-inch steel plate added. Pad 39A is being made ready for its first launch in four years, the upcoming STS-117 on March 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager, addresses guests and attendees in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay in the ceremony commemorating the bay's transition for use by the Constellation Program. Seated on the dais at right are representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida: Russell Romanella, director of the International Space Station/Payload Processing Directorate at Kennedy Space Center, Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Bill Parsons, director of Kennedy Space Center; and Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida are seated on stage at a ceremony to commemorate the transition of the historic Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay for use by the Constellation Program. From left are Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Bill Parsons, Kennedy Space Center director; Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida; and Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager. Representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida are seated on stage at a ceremony to commemorate the transition of the historic Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay for use by the Constellation Program. From left are Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Bill Parsons, Kennedy Space Center director; Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida; and Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The rotating service structure on Launch Pad 39A has moved for the first time in more than a year due to maintenance and upgrades on the pad. Some of the work included sandblasting the structure to remove rust and repainting. In addition, the RSS was jacked up and a new upper-bearing race assembly installed where the RSS pivots against the fixed service structure and a half-inch steel plate added. Pad 39A is being made ready for its first launch in four years, the upcoming STS-117 on March 15. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons addresses guests and attendees in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building high bay in the ceremony commemorating the bay's transition for use by the Constellation Program. Representatives from NASA, Lockheed Martin, Space Florida and the state of Florida are seated at right: Russell Romanella, director of the International Space Station/Payload Processing Directorate at Kennedy Space Center, Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin program manager; Thad Altman, representative of the State of Florida; Steve Koller, executive director of Space Florida; and Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager. Originally built to process space vehicles in the Apollo era, the O&C Building will serve as the final assembly facility for the Orion crew exploration vehicle. Orion, America's human spaceflight vehicle of the future, will be capable of transporting four crewmembers for lunar missions and later will support crew transfers for Mars missions. Each Orion spacecraft also may be used to support up to six crewmembers to the International Space Station after the space shuttle is retired in 2010. Design, development and construction of Orion's components will be performed by Lockheed Martin for NASA at facilities throughout the country. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
1-12 of 12