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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft is ready for mating to the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. Seen in the photo are the three satellites that make up the ST5, containing miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Pegasus XL launch vehicle is ready for mating with the Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. The ST5 contains three microsatellites with miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, a worker examines the end of the Pegasus XL launch vehicle that will be mated with the Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. The ST5 contains three microsatellites with miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Pegasus XL launch vehicle is complete after mating with the Space Technology 5 (ST5). The ST5 contains three microsatellites, with miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft is ready for mating to the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. Seen in the photo are the three satellites that make up the ST5, containing miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Dark clouds hover over the Vehicle Assembly Building as a cold front passes through Kennedy Space Center on a winter's day in Florida.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Orbital Sciences? Building 1555 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, workers begin the mating process of the Space Technology 5 (ST5), at right, with the Pegasus XL launch vehicle, at left. The ST5 contains three microsatellites, with miniaturized redundant components and technologies. Each will validate New Millennium Program selected technologies, such as the Cold Gas Micro-Thruster and X-Band Transponder Communication System. After deployment from the Pegasus, the micro-satellites will be positioned in a ?string of pearls? constellation that demonstrates the ability to position them to perform simultaneous multi-point measurements of the magnetic field using highly sensitive magnetometers. The data will help scientists understand and map the intensity and direction of the Earth?s magnetic field, its relation to space weather events, and affects on our planet. With such missions, NASA hopes to improve scientists? ability to accurately forecast space weather and minimize its harmful effects on space- and ground-based systems. Launch of ST5 is scheduled no earlier than March 6 from Vandenberg Air Force Base.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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