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Browse All : Images from February 1996

1-9 of 9
Composite of a LASCO C1 and LASCO C2 image, taken on 1 February 1996. The inner part shows the corona in the light of the green forbidden coronal line of Fe XIV, the outer (orange) part the streamer belt in the fieldofview of the LASCO C2 coronagraph.
Composite of a LASCO C1...
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Description
Composite of a LASCO C1 and LASCO C2 image, taken on 1 February 1996. The inner part shows the corona in the light of the green forbidden coronal line of Fe XIV, the outer (orange) part the streamer belt in the fieldofview of the LASCO C2 coronagraph.
he inner corona as seen by the LASCO C1 coronagraph in the light of the green forbidden coronal line of Fe XIV.Coronal structures can be seen as far as 1 million km above the solar surface.The large-scale solar magnetic field is being traced by loop systems,which are forming all around the Sun in different latitude zones, as demonstrated by the appearance of the corona above both the east and the west limbs. Three loop systems can be seen from high northern to high southern latitudes,bridging the solar equator. This magnetic configuration is known as a magnetic "quadrupole," because it has four magnetic zones, each zone bordering another of opposite polarity. Inherently,this configuration is not stable. This picture was taken on 1 February 1996, just 2 days before the coronal mass ejection shown in another figure on this page. Back [ http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/gallery/SolarCorona/index.html ]
he inner corona as seen...<a target="_blank" href="http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/gallery/SolarCorona/index.html"></a>
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Description
he inner corona as seen by the LASCO C1 coronagraph in the light of the green forbidden coronal line of Fe XIV.Coronal structures can be seen as far as 1 million km above the solar surface.The large-scale solar magnetic field is being traced by loop systems,which are forming all around the Sun in different latitude zones, as demonstrated by the appearance of the corona above both the east and the west limbs. Three loop systems can be seen from high northern to high southern latitudes,bridging the solar equator. This magnetic configuration is known as a magnetic "quadrupole," because it has four magnetic zones, each zone bordering another of opposite polarity. Inherently,this configuration is not stable. This picture was taken on 1 February 1996, just 2 days before the coronal mass ejection shown in another figure on this page. Back [ http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/gallery/SolarCorona/index.html ]
The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of Ne VIII at 770.4 A, formed in the lower corona at about 600,000 K. The picture was put together from 8 horizontal raster scans in alternating directions and of different length, starting in the solar SE. Each raster scan includes 664 to 1074 exposures, each lasting 7.5 s. The picture is shown in bins of 3x3 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec^2. The brightest pixels in this picture correspond to an intensity of approx. 260 counts/line/arcsec^2, whereas the intensity is generally below 40. The avera intensity on the disk is around 6 counts/line/arcsec^2.
The Sun observed by SUM...
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Description
The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of Ne VIII at 770.4 A, formed in the lower corona at about 600,000 K. The picture was put together from 8 horizontal raster scans in alternating directions and of different length, starting in the solar SE. Each raster scan includes 664 to 1074 exposures, each lasting 7.5 s. The picture is shown in bins of 3x3 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec^2. The brightest pixels in this picture correspond to an intensity of approx. 260 counts/line/arcsec^2, whereas the intensity is generally below 40. The avera intensity on the disk is around 6 counts/line/arcsec^2.
The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of C III lines at 977.020 , formed in the transition region at a temperature of about 70 000 K. The image is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec. The patchy pattern is the chromospheric network, with individual cells being of the size of about 30 000 km. Also note some prominences over the limb. This image was the first full Sun scan of SUMER.
The Sun observed by SUM...
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Description
The Sun observed by SUMER on 2 February 1996 in the emission line of C III lines at 977.020 , formed in the transition region at a temperature of about 70 000 K. The image is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec. The patchy pattern is the chromospheric network, with individual cells being of the size of about 30 000 km. Also note some prominences over the limb. This image was the first full Sun scan of SUMER.
The Sun in C IV 1548 A as observed by SUMER on 4-5 February 1996. The picture was put together from eight horizontal raster scans across the Sun, altogether 7406 exposures, each lasting 15 seconds. The picture is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec.
The Sun in C IV 1548 A ...
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Description
The Sun in C IV 1548 A as observed by SUMER on 4-5 February 1996. The picture was put together from eight horizontal raster scans across the Sun, altogether 7406 exposures, each lasting 15 seconds. The picture is shown in bins of 4x4 pixels, one pixel being approx. 1 arcsec.
A Bright Ring of Star Birth around a Galaxy's Core
A Bright Ring of Star B...
NGC 4314
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud
SN1987A in the Large Ma...
SN 1987A
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud
SN1987A in the Large Ma...
2008-02-15 0:0:0
 
Mt. Pinatubo, Phillippines - Perspective View
Mt. Pinatubo, Phillippi...
The effects of the June...
Sol (our sun)
AirSAR
 
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