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Browse All : Images from February 1999

1-17 of 17
El Niño-La Niña Sea Surface Temperature and Height Anomalies: January 1997 through February 1999
El Niño-La Niña Sea Sur...
NOAA-14/AVHRR
An animation of sea sur...
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
IC 418: The "Spirograph" Nebula
IC 418: The "Spirograph...
IC 418
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Movies from Hubble Show the Changing Faces of Infant Stars
Movies from Hubble Show...
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
The Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One) Buildup
The Integrated Truss As...
1999-09-01
 
DC-8 Airborne Laborator...
The DC-8 Airborne Scien...
February 1999
 
NEAR Mathilde
NEAR Mathilde
Earth
February 1999
 
Media Type
Image
facet_when_year
1999
Bright Comet SOHO
Bright Comet SOHO
BELLATRIX
February 1999
 
Media Type
Image
facet_when_year
1999
The Martian North Polar Cap in Summer - One Year Later
The Martian North Polar...
In the middle of Januar...
Sol (our sun)
Mars Orbiter Camera
 
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
KSC-99PP-0230 (23 February 1999) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --? Viewed from inside the altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, depositing it into the altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 24-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test. PHOTO CREDIT: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
KSC-99PP-0229 (23 February 1999) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered by crane into the altitude chamber below during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, depositing it into the altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 24-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test. PHOTO CREDIT: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S99-02362 (February 1999) --- Scott D. Altman, STS-109 mission commander.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS96-S-001 (February 1999) --- Designed by the crew members, this is the mission insignia for the STS-96 space flight, the second Space Shuttle mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The crew patch highlights the major themes of the Station Program: Earth-directed research, the advancement of human space exploration, and international cooperation. The Space Shuttle Discovery is depicted shortly after reaching orbit as the crew prepares to carry out the first docking with the new Station. At this early stage in its construction, ISS consists of two modules: Zarya and Unity, shown orbiting Earth. The triangular shape of the patch represents building on the knowledge and experience of earlier missions, while the three vertical bars of the astronaut emblem point toward future human endeavors in space. The five-pointed star that tops the astronaut emblem in this depiction is symbolic of the five space agencies participating in the development of ISS: NASA, the Russian Space Agency, the European Space Agency, the National Space Development Agency of Japan, and the Canadian Space Agency. The blend of red, white, and blue is a tribute to the nationalities of the crew members who are from the United States, Canada, and Russia. NOTE: The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availablity has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.
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