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Browse All : Images of Arizona

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PAPAGO INDIAN VILLAGE OF SIL NAKYA ARIZONA REFRIGERATOR
PAPAGO INDIAN VILLAGE O...
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PAPAGO INDIAN VILLAGE OF SIL NAKYA ARIZONA REFRIGERATOR
PAPAGO INDIAN VILLAGE O...
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PHOTOVOLTAIC POWERED INSECT SURVEY TRAPS NEAR COLLEGE STATION & NAVASOTA TEXAS - PHOTOVOLTAIC POWERED DUST STORM WARNING SIGN ON INTERSTATE 10 NEAR CASA GRANDE ARIZONA
PHOTOVOLTAIC POWERED IN...
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STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS090-736-037 (17 April - 3 May 1998) --- Phoenix, Arizona as photographed with a 70mm handheld camera from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. Sunglint makes canals and pools very easily identifiable in the frame. Minimal cloud cover during the 16-day Neurolab mission and the flight track of Columbia opened the way for the crew members to photograph more North American cities than most Shuttle missions.
International Space Sta...
2005-11-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-11543 (3 August 2005) --- Algodones Dunefield, CA is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crew member on the international space station. Fans of the Star Wars series of films may recognize the Algodones Dunefield ? also known as the Imperial Dunes - as portions of the imaginary planet of Tatooine. While not planetary in scale, this dune field located at the junction of three states (Arizona and California in the USA; Baja California del Norte in Mexico) is a distinctive feature of North America. The field is approximately 72 kilometers long by 10 kilometers wide (45 miles by 6 miles) and extends along a northwest-southeast line that correlates to the prevailing northerly and westerly wind directions. The dune field is designated a wilderness area, with the only manmade structure being the All American Canal that cuts across the southern portion from west to east (right side of view). A checkerboard pattern of farms in the Colorado River floodplain is visible on the Mexican side of the border (far right). Wisps of clouds obscure the Cargo Muchacho Mountains (top). Distinctive dune forms pointed out by NASA geologists in this image include transverse mega-dunes and linear dunes. The transverse dunes, appearing much like a large tank tread along the long axis of the dune field, are the largest features and were formed by strong and constant northwesterly winds. A fine pattern of smaller dunes has formed along the crests and windward (northwestern) sides of these large dunes and point to continuing sediment transport activity. Networks of small dunes along the western side of the dune field suggest that wind direction here is more variable and perhaps influenced by the large transverse dunes themselves. Long linear dunes extending northwest-southeast are visible along the western edge of the dune field. The presence of vegetated drainage networks along the northeastern border of the field, and the relative lack of dunes themselves, suggest that rapid dune migration is not occurring along this margin. The majority of dune migration today occurs at a rate of approximately 0.3 meter/year (1 foot/year) along the southeast margin of the dune field.
International Space Sta...
2005-11-04 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-05172 (14 October 2005) --- Navajo Mountain, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crewmember on the international space station. According to scientists, the Colorado Plateau of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah is characterized by mostly flat-lying sedimentary layers that record paleoclimate extremes ranging from oceans to widespread deserts over the last 1.8 billion years. Navajo Mountain is formed by a dome-shaped body of igneous rock (called a laccolith by geologists), one of several in southeast Utah that intrude and uplift the surrounding sedimentary layers of the Plateau. This oblique image highlights Navajo Mountain in the center of the image, surrounded by light red-brown Navajo Sandstone (also visible in canyons at bottom of image). Scientists believe the peak of Navajo Mountain, at approximately 3148 meters (10,388 feet) elevation, is comprised of uplifted Dakota Sandstone deposited during the Cretaceous Period. The establishment of Rainbow Bridge National Monument (1910), and the filling of Glen Canyon by Lake Powell in 1963 (upper right), have facilitated tourism and aesthetic appreciation of this previously remote region. Access to Navajo Mountain is still regulated by the sovereign Navajo Nation, and the process of permitting is required to hike in the region.
International Space Sta...
2004-06-21 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-05953 (7 May 2004) --- The Pinacates Biosphere Reserve is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). The Pinacates?a moon-like volcanic landscape that lies in the Sonoran Desert in Mexico just a few miles from the border with Arizona?is one of the most unique and striking landscapes in North America. The volcanic range is surrounded by one of North America?s largest dune fields, Gran Desierto. The natural history of the region includes thousands of years of human occupation; it is the aboriginal homeland of the O?Odham tribe, also known as the Papago. The region also served as an early training site for Apollo astronauts in the mid-late 1960s. The name Pinacate is derived from ?pinacatl,? the Aztec name for the desert stink beetle which is common in the region. The natural and cultural resource management of the region, including the archeological sites and the high biodiversity, is now guaranteed: the site was declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in 1993. The high-resolution image provides a view of a large volcanic crater called Crater Elegante, which is one of the most prominent and interesting features of the Pinacates.
International Space Sta...
2004-06-21 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-05944 (7 May 2004) --- The Pinacates Biosphere Reserve is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). The Pinacates?a moon-like volcanic landscape that lies in the Sonoran Desert in Mexico just a few miles from the border with Arizona?is one of the most unique and striking landscapes in North America. The volcanic range is surrounded by one of North America?s largest dune fields, Gran Desierto. The natural history of the region includes thousands of years of human occupation; it is the aboriginal homeland of the O?Odham tribe, also known as the Papago. The region also served as an early training site for Apollo astronauts in the mid-late 1960s. The name Pinacate is derived from ?pinacatl,? the Aztec name for the desert stink beetle which is common in the region. The natural and cultural resource management of the region, including the archeological sites and the high biodiversity, is now guaranteed: the site was declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in 1993. The high-resolution image provides a view of a large volcanic crater called Crater Elegante, which is one of the most prominent and interesting features of the Pinacates.
International Space Sta...
2004-07-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-10382 (7 June 2004) --- Tucson, Arizona is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Tucson lies between the forested Catalina Mountains and the Tucson Mountains (dark reddish brown at left). The typical western North American cityscape is a pattern of regular north-south aligned rectangles outlined by major streets set one mile apart. Tucson?s Randolph golf course is the large rectangular dark zone in the image center. The striking contrast between the golf course and its surroundings is due to dense grass cover maintained by frequent watering. The rectangular grid pattern disappears in the small streets of the original city center, situated along the Santa Cruz River (enters the view lower left and exits in the top left corner). Newer and less densely built-up neighborhoods in the foothills of the Catalina Mountains are designed to incorporate natural landscape features, and retain major washes with natural vegetation. This portion of the cityscape seen from space is consequently quite different from the main city grid. The foothills afford views of the city to the south and the mountains to the north and are major areas of development. Large white dots within the urban grid are the reflective rooftops of shopping malls. Tucson enjoys an important position along several major crossroads. Interstate highway I-10, which connects southern California to Florida, appears as a straight line running parallel with the Santa Cruz River northwest from Tucson in the direction of Phoenix. The I-10 traverses a well-marked alluvial fan that extends from the Santa Rita Mountains to the southeast (fine drainage pattern lower center) and exits the view lower right. Highway I-19 is the straight line (lower left) leading south from the city center, between the Santa Cruz River and rectangular spoil heaps of nearby copper mines. The I-19 connects Tucson with Nogales on the Mexican border.
International Space Sta...
2006-06-02 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-17394 (10 May 2006) --- The central Phoenix Metro Area, Arizona is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area is the largest in the southwestern United States, and is comprised of 21 contiguous incorporated municipalities. Such a collection of discrete political entities forming a larger integrated urban landscape is referred to as a conurbation by urban geographers. This portion of a high resolution (approximately 9 meters/pixel) photograph (upper image) of the central metro region includes the boundary area between three of the municipalities included in the conurbation: the Cities of Phoenix (upper image, left), Tempe (upper image, center and lower right), and Scottsdale (upper image, upper right).
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000E02283 --- STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Pre-Flight Imagery --- Still image of Escalante, Arizona 30 and 90 meter comparison.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-00455 (October 2004) --- Dean Eppler, equipped with a Mark-III suit, works at the rear of a science trailer, which is pulled by an electric tractor. The activity was part of a NASA-led effort using the rugged terrain and variegated climate of Arizona desert land to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. Geology tools, used throughout the test/demonstration, are on the front of the trailer. The Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center. Eppler spent a number of long sessions attired in the planetary surface exploration suit technology demonstrator as he interfaced with much of the gear used during the field trip.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-43624 (October 2004) --- Dean Eppler, equipped with a Mark-III suit, takes a stroll in Arizona's high desert as part of a NASA-led team using the rugged terrain and variegated climate to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. The Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center. Eppler spent a number of long sessions attired in the planetary surface exploration suit technology demonstrator as he interfaced with much of the gear used during the field trip.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-43529 (October 2004) --- Dean Eppler, equipped with a Mark-III suit, pauses at the rear of a science trailer as part of a NASA-led effort using the rugged terrain and variegated climate of Arizona desert land to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. Geology tools, used throughout the test/demonstration, are on the front of the trailer. The Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center. Eppler spent a number of long sessions attired in the planetary surface exploration suit technology demonstrator as he interfaced with much of the gear used during the field trip.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-43474 (October 2004) --- Kevin Groneman, the lead technician in the Advanced EVA Technology Development Lab, drives an electric tractor as part of a NASA-led effort using the rugged terrain and variegated climate of Arizona desert land to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. Groneman wears an I-suit. The Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-43618 (October 2004) --- Dean Eppler, equipped with a Mark-III suit, operates the controls for a robot named Matilda as part of a NASA-led effort using the rugged terrain and variegated climate of Arizona desert land to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. The Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center. Eppler spent a number of long sessions attired in the planetary surface exploration suit technology demonstrator as he interfaced with much of the gear used during the field trip.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2004-E-49595 (October 2004) --- Jeff Graham (right) and Nathan Howard (NASA), the Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team's Mechanical Engineer, discuss braking issues regarding the nearby robot named Boudreaux during a field trip to the high desert of Arizona. Graham, who has a strong Louisiana background (he calls Baton Rouge his hometown and he attended Louisiana State University), named the robot, one of a number of pieces of hardware tested by the group. The activity was part of a NASA-led effort using the rugged terrain and variegated climate of Arizona desert land to try out prototype spacesuits and innovative equipment that may help America pursue the Vision for Space Exploration to return the Moon and travel beyond. The team is led by scientists from the Johnson Space Center and the Glenn Research Center.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38294 (8-13 September 2005) --- Dean Eppler of SAIC and Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover collect soil samples during Desert RATS activity in Arizona
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38267 (8-13 September 2005) --- Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover stands beside a core sampling tool on the edge of Meteor Crater during Desert RATS activity in Arizona.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38265 (8-13 September 2005 --- Dean Eppler (SAIC) in orange checks an ILC-Dover made I-suit worn by Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover during Desert RATS activity in Arizona.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38283 (8-13 September 2005) --- SCOUT Project Lead Frank Delgado and Desert RATS Lead Joe Kosmo of JSC discuss experiment operations as technicians prepare the rover and two suited subjects for a test during Desert RATS activity in Arizona.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38278 (8-13 September 2005 ) --- SCOUT rover testbed follows Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover by using stereo-vision cameras and autonomous operation programs during Desert RATS activity in Arizona.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38281 (8-13 September 2005 ) --- Dean Eppler of SAIC and Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover take a ride on SCOUT during Desert RATS activity in Arizona.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2005-E-38264 (8-13 September 2005) --- Keith Splawn of ILC-Dover collects a soil sample on the edge of Meteor Crater during Desert RATS activity in Arizona
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39966 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS), a team of scientists and engineers who test futuristic equipment that may one day be used for explorations of the moon and Mars, is in the Arizona desert. This photo shows Centaur removing packed samples from the SCOUT (Science, Crew, Operations and Utility Testbed) rover. Behind is a mock way station -- called a Pressurized Rover Compartment (PRC) -- which has been delivered to the site by Athlete, an All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer vehicle capable of "walking" over extremely rough or steep terrain.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39970 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- It's just another day of work for NASA's Desert RATS, a group of more than 100 scientists and engineers participating in field tests in Arizona's high desert. Robots, rovers and space suited subjects test the latest interplanetary gear trekking over some of the state's harshest topography. In this photo, a half-humanoid robot known as Centaur, far left, is joined by the K-10 robot with its 3-D vision and a futuristic lunar vehicle known as SCOUT.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39964 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- Testing the next generation of spacesuits and equipment in the Arizona desert, an "astronaut" heads to a mock way station that has been delivered to the site by a giant robot capable of "walking" over steep terrain. The giant robot, known as Athlete or All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer vehicle, can be seen at rest beneath the way station. The test was part of the 2006 NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS), a team of scientists and engineers who test futuristic equipment that may one day be used for explorations of the moon and Mars.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39968 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- NASA's Centaur, the half-humanoid, half-vehicle robot pictured in the foreground, is ready for a day's work in the high desert of Arizona. Centaur participated in the NASA's testing of the next generation of space equipment during the Desert RATS field test. Pictured with Centaur is NASA Ames Research Center's K-10 robot, far left, and Johnson Space Center's SCOUT rover. SCOUT -- NASA's Science Crew Operations and Utility Testbed -- is a multi-use rover able to transport both astronauts and equipment, follow verbal commands and hand signals, take direction by wireless remote control, act as communication and video relay stations and carry extra supplies.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-39969 (4-15 Sept. 2006) --- NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS), a team of scientists and engineers who test futuristic equipment that may one day be used for explorations of the moon and Mars, is in the Arizona desert. In one scenario, the crew (see test subject on platform) will return to a mock way station, called a Pressurized Rover Compartment (PRC), which has been delivered to the site by Athlete, an All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer vehicle capable of "walking" over extremely rough or steep terrain. Once the crew dismounts the rover and enters the way station, a half humanoid, half vehicle robot known as Centaur will unload the day's sample collection and equipment. Another robot (K-10) will then "visually" inspect the rover. The robotic maneuvers will be controlled through a satellite link to NASA's Exploration Planning and Operations Center at JSC.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S69-55662 (10/10/69) - Astronauts Alan L. Bean (left) and Charles Conrad Jr., two crewmen of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, are pictured during a geological field trip and training at a simulated lunar surface area near Flagstaff, Arizona. Bean and Conrad are scheduled to participate in extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. Here, Conrad gets a close look through hand lens at the stratography of a man-dug hole while Bean looks on.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S95-01072 (January 1995) --- This artwork is part of a series of depiction's of proposed projects involving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Lunar Discovery Orbiter (LDO) is depicted skimming just 20 kilometers over the lunar surface as it approaches Amundsen, a large terraced crater near the Moon's south pole. Shadows in the crater and in nearby areas may conceal deposits of ice permanently shadowed from the Sun's rays but quantifiable with LDO's instruments. LDO is expected to accomplish the first high-resolution global survey of the Moon. Developed by the University of Arizona, the Boeing Defense and Space Group and NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, this mission addresses the fundamental questions in lunar and planetary science and prepares for future exploration and use of the Moon. This artwork is a painting done by Pat Rawlings, of SAIC, for NASA. EDITOR'S NOTE: This is a proposed program not yet funded. A decision is expected sometime this year regarding the project's funding.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-15 0:0:0
 
Description S95-01566 (February 1995) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) Two kilometers above the lava flows of Mars' Tharsis Bulge region, a geologist collects samples from the eastern cliff at the base of Olympus Mons, the solar system's largest known shield volcano. To better understand the evolution of the Arizona-sized volcano, the scientist investigates the layers of hardened lava that make up the massive feature. The block-like nature of the rock face, caused by columnar jointing, is similar to features on Earth, such as the Devil's Tower in Wyoming. Artwork done for NASA by Pat Rawlings, of SAIC.
STS-100 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS100-716-176 (19 April - 1 May 2001)--- The deeply entrenched, meandering Colorado River is distinctively dark as the river winds its way across the arid terrain of southeast Utah in this 70mm frame photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. While Glen Canyon Dam (bottom of image) is located in northern Arizona, the reservoir of Lake Powell is in Utah. The Escalante and San Juan Rivers, two major tributaries that flow into Lake Powell (from the northwest and east respectively) are also discernable. The darker-looking, elongated and elevated feature north of Lake Powell is the Kaiparowits Plateau. Navajo Mountain is the darker circular feature to the south (to the right) of the lake.
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