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Mount Ubinas, Peru
Mount Ubinas, Peru
Subduction of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazca_Plate">Nazca...</a><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andes_Mountains"></a><a href="http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1504-02="></a><a href="http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/scripts/sseop/photo.pl?mission=ISS013&roll=E&frame=66488"></a><a href="http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/home/index.html"></a><a href="http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/"></a>
ISS- Digital Camera
 
International Space Sta...
2005-11-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-06422 (19 May 2005) --- Rosario, Argentina is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station. The Paran? River in the center of the view is the principal transportation artery of central South America, and consequently gave rise from the times of early colonization to the growth of river port cities such as Argentina?s second city, Rosario, now a major industrial center (population greater than 1.1 million; lower left). Rosario is the center of a vibrant local agricultural economy?intensive agriculture is visible on the left margin of the view. As such, Rosario is one of the key cities in South America?s MERCOSUR common market (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). Other cities have expanded along the river bank especially northwards (for example, Capitan Bermudez, top left). Not only is the region around Rosario targeted for local economic development, but it is now a transportation hub. Rosario?s port facilities (center bottom), and facilities along the length of the Paran?-Paraguay river systems (the traditional north-south transport route), have been improved to give efficient river barge access to landlocked regions upstream?Paraguay, Bolivia and southwestern Brazil?connecting them to Buenos Aires, 300 kilometers to the south. East-west transport connections are becoming increasingly important for MERCOSUR trade with products from Argentina and southern Brazil moving by road and rail, via Rosario, to Pacific ports in Chile and then even to Asia. The great Rosario-Victoria bridge (center), completed in 2002, facilitates this east-west movement of goods. The bridge casts a shadow where it crosses almost two kilometers of open river. Viaducts and earth-filled sections continue the new highway to the city of Victoria to the east another 57 kilometers across the great swamplands of the Paran? floodplain?part of which is visible in the right half of the view. The bridge is one of very few road or rail connections between the east and west banks of South America?s second largest river. It allows the economic center of Argentina to communicate for the first time directly by road not only with Argentina?s remote northeastern provinces, but also with Uruguay and Brazil.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-23 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-66488 (14 Aug. 2006) --- Ash cloud from Ubinas Volcano, Peru is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Subduction of the Nazca tectonic plate along the western coast of South America forms the high Peruvian Andes, and also produces magma feeding a chain of historically active volcanoes along the western front of the mountains. The most active of these volcanoes in Peru is Ubinas. A typical steep-sided stratovolcano comprised primarily of layers of silica-rich lava flows, it has a summit elevation of 5,672 meters. The volcanic cone appears distinctively truncated or flat-topped in profile -- the result of a relatively small eruption that evacuated a magma reservoir near the summit. Following removal of the magma, the summit material collapsed downwards to form the current 1.4 kilometer-wide summit caldera. This oblique image (looking at an angle from the ISS) captures an ash cloud first observed on satellite imagery at 11:00 GMT on Aug. 14, 2006; this image was acquired one hour and 45 minutes later. The ash cloud resulted in the issuing of an aviation hazard warning by the Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. Modern activity at Ubinas is characterized by these minor to moderate explosive eruptions of ash and larger pumice - a volcanic rock characterized by low density and high proportion of gas bubbles formed as the explosively-erupted parent lava cools during its transit through the air. These materials blanket the volcanic cone and surrounding area, giving this image an overall gray appearance. Shadowing of the western flank of Ubinas throws several lava flows into sharp relief, and highlights the steep slopes at the flow fronts -- a common characteristic of silica-rich, thick, and slow-moving lavas. NASA researchers note that the most recent major eruption of Ubinas occurred in 1969, however the historical record of activity extends back to the 16th century.
International Space Sta...
2007-03-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-05615 (14 Oct. 2006) --- Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. The port city of Bahia Blanca lies almost 600 kilometers southwest of Buenos Aires on the southern rim of the Argentine economic heartland. This small city of 275,000 people is captured in one frame which shows its position near the mouth of the Arroyo Naposta. The salt flats (gray) and wetlands bordering this estuary, characterized by twisting, light colored tidal channels and dark swamps, lie mainly on the south side of the river. The yellow tinge to the water surfaces arises from the partial sunglint reflection on this particular day. The name Bahia Blanca (White Bay) derives from the white color of the salt and was applied to the major bay--noted by Magellan as he probed the coast of South America for a passage to the Pacific Ocean in 1520--and then to the city at the head of this bay. Highways, airline routes and pipelines from oil and gas fields to the west and south all converge on Bahia Blanca. The city is a major cultural center and historically has acted as a gateway for immigration. Higher ground on the north side of the estuary affords stable ground for the growth of the city and for intensive agriculture, a mainstay of the Argentine economy. The city is set back from the waterfront where an industrial park, a petrochemical center, and dockyards (white ellipse) are located.
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