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Browse All : Images of Idaho

1-17 of 17
Fires in Idaho
Fires in Idaho
8/20/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Craters of the Moon, Idaho
Craters of the Moon, Id...
2/1/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
A90-3000
A90-3000
8/21/90
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1990
Drought in the U.S. Pacific Northwest
Drought in the U.S. Pac...
From December to March,...<a href="http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/seasonal_drought.html"></a><A HREF="http://www.ncep.noaa.gov/"></A>
NOAA-15 POES- AVHRR
 
Drought in the U.S. Pacific Northwest
Drought in the U.S. Pac...
From December to March,...<a href="http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/seasonal_drought.html"></a><A HREF="http://www.ncep.noaa.gov/"></A>
NOAA-15 POES- AVHRR
 
Smoke over the Dakotas
Smoke over the Dakotas
Thanks to <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=14443">fires</a> in west...<a href="http://alg.umbc.edu/usaq/archives/002351.html"></a><a href="http://terra.nasa.gov"></a><a href="http://www.eos.ucar.edu/mopitt/"></a>
Terra- MOPITT
 
Libby South Fire, Washington
Libby South Fire, Washi...
On July 9, 2001, a fire...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/redirect?http://terra.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></a></a><a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/redirect?http://modland.nascom.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></a>
 
Libby South Fire, Washington
Libby South Fire, Washi...
On July 9, 2001, a fire...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/redirect?http://terra.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></a></a><a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/redirect?http://modland.nascom.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></a>
 
Northwest corner of Wyoming
Northwest corner of Wyo...
A near vertical view of...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
Yellowstone River and Wyoming as seen from STS-58
Yellowstone River and W...
Yellowstone Lake and th...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
Space Radar Image of Craters of the Moon, Idaho
Space Radar Image of Cr...
Sol (our sun)
 
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-17557 (17 October 2003) --- This sweeping view of the Rocky Mountains and the western US was taken when the International Space Station (ISS) traveled over eastern Washington on October 17, 2003. The POV of the Station was looking southeast over the mountains of Idaho (foreground) and Wyoming (Yellowstone, the Tetons and the Wind River Range are just right and above the center of the image). Great Salt Lake is in the lower right of the image.
International Space Sta...
2007-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-22276 (13 Aug. 2007) --- Smoke plumes from wide-spread fires across Idaho, Utah and Montana are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-118) was docked with the station. Looking westward toward the horizon, this image covers an expanse from northern Utah to central Idaho with southwest Montana in the foreground.
International Space Sta...
2007-08-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-22269 (13 Aug. 2007) --- The crew aboard the International Space Station provided this image of the wide-spread forest fires in the Payette National Forest, Central Idaho within the Salmon River Mountains. North is toward the left of the image. The Salmon River is the feature in the bottom central part of the frame. Lake Cascade is seen at the lower right.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-811-019 Yellowstone Area, Wyoming September, 1996 The Yellowstone area, one of the most geologically unique regions in the world, can be seen in this synoptic generally west-looking low-oblique view. The majority of the area is located atop a geothermal ?hotspot? in the mantle of the earth, a geologic layer just below the earth?s crust. This concentrated hotspot under the earth provides the heat necessary to drive the incredible hydrothermal features and volcanic activity. The world?s greatest concentration of geysers and hot springs are situated here in the Yellowstone area. A large caldera, which is caused by a collapsed volcano, exists in the southern portion of Yellowstone and is the remnant of a major volcanic eruption that occurred about 1.2 million years ago. Yellowstone Lake, (small and very dark blue) just to the right and slightly above the center of the image, is the largest high mountain lake in North America and fills part of the huge caldera. Other features visible in this view include the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole (to the left of Yellowstone Lake); the Absaroka Range (to the east or right of Yellowstone Lake); and the Wind River Range (extending southeastward or below the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole). The Bighorn Mountains of north central Wyoming are discernible in the lower right portion of the image. Between the Bighorn Mountains and the Yellowstone area is the Bighorn Basin. Near the bottom center of the image is the Great Divide Basin. In the bottom left portion of the image are the Uinta Mountains of northern Utah. Bear Lake and the northern Wasatch Range are visible near the left center of the image. Just to the west of the Wasatch Range, the northern portion of the Great Salt Lake is discernible. Extending westward from the Yellowstone area toward the upper left of the image is the Snake River Plain of eastern Idaho.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS112-708-002 (7-18 October 2002) --- This image, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis, covers parts of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho. The Front Range of the Rockies is the dark range crossing the bottom of the view, with Denver and neighboring cities (grays) situated in the gentle embayment of the mountains (bottom center of the view). Great Salt Lake in Utah appears as two colors of blue top left, with the snow-covered Uinta Mountains just below, in this northwesterly view. Most of the view encompasses the brown plains of western Wyoming (center) and the cluster of mountains around Yellowstone (top center, top right, with snow). Beyond the brown Snake River Plain, black rocks of the Sawtooth Mountains and neighboring ranges of central Idaho appear top center.
International Space Sta...
2007-07-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-05815 (30 April 2007) --- Algae in Great Salt Lake, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Great Salt Lake of northern Utah is a remnant of glacial Lake Bonneville that extended over much of present-day western Utah, and into the neighboring states of Nevada and Idaho, approximately 32,000 to 14,000 years ago. During this time, the peaks of adjacent ranges such as the Promontory and Lakeside Mountains were most likely islands. As climate warmed and precipitation decreased in the region, glaciers that fed melt-water to Lake Bonneville disappeared, and the lake began to dry up. The present-day Great Salt Lake is a terminal lake in that water does not flow out of the lake basin. Water loss through the year is due primarily to evaporation, and when this loss exceeds input of water from rivers, streams, precipitation, and groundwater the lake level decreases. This is particularly evident during droughts. This process of evaporation, together with the relatively shallow water levels (maximum lake depth is around 33 feet), has led to increased salinity (dissolved salt content) of the lake waters. The north arm of the Lake, displayed in this image, typically has twice the salinity of the rest of the lake due to impoundment of water by a railroad causeway that crosses the lake from east to west. This restriction of water flow has led to a striking division in the types of algae and bacteria found in the north and south arms of the lake. In the northern arm (north of the causeway), the red algae Dunaliella Salina and the bacterial species Halo bacterium produce a pronounced reddish cast to the water, whereas the south arm (south of the causeway) is dominated by green algae such as Dunaliella viridis. The Great Salt Lake also supports brine shrimp and brine flies; and is a major stopover point for migratory birds including avocets, stilts, and plovers.
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