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Browse All : Images of Los Angeles

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Lee R. Scherer
Lee R. Scherer
11/13/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Santa Ana Winds Fuel California Wildfires
Santa Ana Winds Fuel Ca...
10/14/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Fires in California
Fires in California
11/17/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Fires in California
Fires in California
11/19/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Jesusita Fire, California
Jesusita Fire, Californ...
5/12/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Fires in Los Angeles County
Fires in Los Angeles Co...
9/1/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Fires in Los Angeles County 3
Fires in Los Angeles Co...
9/1/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
More Los Angeles Fire Images
More Los Angeles Fire I...
9/1/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
More Fires in Los Angeles County
More Fires in Los Angel...
9/3/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Extent of Station Fire Burn
Extent of Station Fire ...
9/9/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
STS-119 Goes to the Ballgame
STS-119 Goes to the Bal...
4/30/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
9/3/99
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1999
Comet Hale-Bopp
Comet Hale-Bopp
3/20/97
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1997
Comet Hale-Bopp
Comet Hale-Bopp
3/20/97
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1997
Comet Hale-Bopp
Comet Hale-Bopp
3/20/97
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1997
Comet Hale-Bopp
Comet Hale-Bopp
3/20/97
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1997
Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
7/20/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
Los Angeles, California L band
Los Angeles, California...
10/5/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Orange County, Calif. L and C bands
Orange County, Calif. L...
4/25/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Perspective View, Garlock Fault
Perspective View, Garlo...
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Perspective View, San Andreas Fault
Perspective View, San A...
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Perspective View, San Andreas Fault
Perspective View, San A...
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Perspective with Landsat Overlay Santa Monica Bay to Mount Baden-Powell, CA
Perspective with Landsa...
10/5/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain
San Andreas Fault in th...
11/13/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
San Fernando Valley
San Fernando Valley
11/5/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
San Fernando Valley, California
San Fernando Valley, Ca...
8/13/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
Santa Cruz Island, Calif. L & C bands
Santa Cruz Island, Cali...
2/22/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Les Johnson Views Interstellar Sail Material
Les Johnson Views Inter...
2002-09-09
 
NASA Sails for the Stars
NASA Sails for the Star...
1999-10-21
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Day after day of stormy...
TRMM
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
Flooding in Brazil
Flooding in Brazil
This dramatic image cap...<b></b></a><a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/Archive/Jan2003/brazil.qt"></a>
TRMM
 
Earthquake in the Valley
Earthquake in the Valle...
NASA/U.S. Geological Su...
 
Year 1994
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-36913 (10 March 2003) --- This nighttime view of Los Angeles, California was captured by one of the Expedition Six crewmembers on board the International Space Station (ISS). In the north, Hollywood is nestled against the south side of the Santa Monica Mountains. On the coast, Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and the port facilities at Long Beach Naval Shipyards are also bright spots. The bright lights of Disneyland in Anaheim are also a standout feature.
International Space Sta...
2006-09-25 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-81687 (17 Sept. 2006) --- A forest fire in southern California is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The day fire started in Los Padres National Forest north of Los Angeles on Sept. 4, 2006. Easterly winds on Sept. 17 blew the smoke west out to sea, and this wind shift was observed by station crewmembers. The forested mountains north of Los Angeles appear dark green, the smoke a dusky gray. Dense farmland at the south end of California's central valley is framed by the forested Sierra Nevada mountain range. White patches near the center of the view are dry lakes of the Mojave Desert, one of which acts as a landing site for the space shuttle. The dark irregular shape at image right is part of the space station. Death Valley and Las Vegas are visible at image right. The extent of the day fire smoke plume can be gauged from the gray urban region of greater Los Angeles (center) which stretches along 50 miles of coastline. The plume obscures the northern Channel Islands, but the southern Channel Islands are silhouetted against the ocean.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000E01554 (January 2000) --- This high-resolution topographic elevation map image is provided for comparison purposes with an aerial, optical image in E01553. Radar imagery, such as that to be provided by SRTM, is instrumental in creating these types of topographic models. Both images depict the San Bernadino and San Gabriel Mountains in California, north of Los Angeles. Cajon Junction and Cajon Pass, as well as part of the San Andreas fault line, are clearly seen.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000E01553 (January 2000) --- This aerial photograph, made with an optical camera, is provided for comparison purposes with the high-resolution topographic elevation map image in E01554. Both images depict the San Bernadino and San Gabriel Mountains in California, north of Los Angeles.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02654 PIA02712 (FOR RELEASE: 17 February 2000) --- This topographic image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, the damage would run into billions of dollars, scientist estimate, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps. This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 144 km (90 miles) x 52 km (32 miles) Location: 34.5 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description [JSC2000-E-02741 PIA02719 (Release Date: 18 February 2000) --- When scientists first looked at this image, at least one was heard to mutter, "From the desert to the mountains to the sea." This image shows in striking detail the varied topography of Southern California. The data, which cover an area one and a half times the size of New Jersey, were acquired in 15 seconds by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The large V-shape across the center of the image is the intersection of the mountains uplifted along two major faults. The San Andreas Fault is the lower part of the "V" and the Garlock Fault is the upper part. Between the faults is the western Mojave Desert, including the alternate landing site for the Shuttle at Edwards Air Force Base, near the center of the image. The Pacific Coast appears in the lower left of the image, from Oxnard at the left center edge, curving southeast to Los Angeles. The flat blue area along the top is the southern end of California's Central Valley. Along the right edge of the image is NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Tracking Station. Scientists will use data like these to study a broad range of topics, including ecology, the environment, geology, as well as to make assessments of seismic, flood, and wildfire hazards. This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 3000 meters (10,000 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 250 km (155 miles) x 150 km (93 miles) Location: 34.8 deg. North lat., 118.0 deg. West lon. Orientation: North at top Data Resolution: 30, meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA]
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02656 PIA02714 (For Release: 17 February 2000) --- This topographic radar image vividly displays California's famous San Andreas Fault along the southwestern edge of the Mojave Desert, 75 kilometers (46 miles) north of downtown Los Angeles. The entire segment of the fault shown in this image last ruptured during the Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857. This was one of the greatest earthquakes ever recorded in the U.S., and it left an amazing surface rupture scar over 350 kilometers in length along the San Andreas. Were the Fort Tejon shock to happen today, scientists say the damage would run into billions of dollars, and the loss of life would likely be substantial, as the communities of Wrightwood, Palmdale, and Lancaster (among others) all lie upon or near the 1857 rupture area. The Lancaster/Palmdale area appears as bright patches just below the center of the image and the San Gabriel Mountains fill the lower left half of the image. At the extreme lower left is Pasadena. High resolution topographic data such as these are used by geologists to study the role of active tectonics in shaping the landscape, and to produce earthquake hazard maps. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 144 km (90 miles) x 52 km (32 miles) Location: 34.5 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02655 PIA2713 (FOR RELEASE: 17 February 2000)--- This topographic radar image shows the relationships of the dense urban development of Los Angeles and the natural contours of the land. The image includes the Pacific Ocean on the left, the flat Los Angeles Basin across the center, and the steep ranges of the Santa Monica and Verdugo mountains along the top. The two dark strips near the coast at lower left are the runways of Los Angeles International Airport. Downtown Los Angeles is the bright yellow and pink area at lower center. Pasadena, including the Rose Bowl, are seen half way down the right edge of the image. The communities of Glendale and Burbank, including the Burbank Airport, are seen at the center of the top edge of the image. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities such as Los Angeles. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 41 km (25 miles) x 29 km (18 miles) Location: 34.1 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02782 PIA02734 (Release Date 21 February 2000) --- This image shows a perspective view of the area around Pasadena, California, just north of Los Angeles. The cluster of hills surrounded by freeways on the left is the Verdugo Hills, which lie between the San Gabriel Valley in the foreground and the San Fernando Valley in the upper left. The San Gabriel Mountains are seen across the top of the image, and parts of the high desert near the city of Palmdale are visible along the horizon on the right. Several urban features can be seen in the image. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)is the bright cluster of buildings just right of center. The flat tan area to the right of JPL at the foot of the mountains is a new housing development devoid of vegetation. Two freeways (the 210 and the 134) cross near the southeastern end of the Verdugo Hills near a white circular feature, the Rose Bowl. The commercial and residential areas of the city of Pasadena are the bright areas clustered around the freeway. These data will be used for a variety of applications including urban planning and natural hazard risk analysis. This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.18 deg. North lat., 118.16 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02781 PIA02733 (Release Date: 21 February 2000) --- San Andreas Fault, Palmdale, California. The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault. This segment of the fault lies near the city of Palmdale, California (the flat area in the right half of the image) about 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American Plate on the right and the Pacific Plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American Plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. The Lake Palmdale Reservoir, approximately 1.5 kilometers (0.9 miles) across, sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Highway 14 is the prominent linear feature starting at the lower left edge of the image and continuing along the far side of the reservoir. The patterns of residential and agricultural development around Palmdale are seen in the Landsat imagery in the right half of the image. SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.58 deg. North lat., 118.13 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-08-07 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-32816 (3 August 2006) --- The crew of STS-121 attended opening day of the 12th "X Games" in Los Angeles Aug. 3, discussing their recent mission to the International Space Station with students and athletes. Astronaut Steven W. Lindsey (with microphone), commander, and his crew take time out of the question and answer session to watch "Rally Car" practice. The crew's visit also included presentations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Science Center.
STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-10-27 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-32815 (3 August 2006) --- The crew of STS-121 attended opening day of the 12th "X Games" in Los Angeles Aug. 3, discussing their recent mission to the International Space Station with students and athletes. From left to right are astronauts Piers J. Sellers, Stephanie D. Wilson, Steven W. Lindsey, Michael E. Fossum, Lisa M. Nowak and Mark E. Kelly. In the background is the signature 80 foot high "Big Air Jump" skateboarding ramp - one of the event highlights. The crew's visit also included presentations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Science Center.
STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-08-07 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-32814 (3 August 2006) --- The crew of STS-121 attended opening day of the 12th "X Games" in Los Angeles Aug. 3, discussing their recent mission to the International Space Station with students and athletes. Astronaut Mark E. Kelly, pilot, stands at the edge of the signature 80 foot high "Big Air Jump" skateboarding ramp - location for one of the event highlights. The crew's visit also included presentations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Science Center.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-14 0:0:0
 
Description S95-01400 (February 1995) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) After first visiting the Moon, this solar electric propulsion vehicle approaches the near-dormant nucleus of Comet Wilson-Harrington. The Diana mission, proposed by NASA Lewis Research Center (LRC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), TRW, the University of California at Los Angeles, and other participants, will provide the first high-resolution compositional, gravitational, and visual mapping of the entire lunar surface. The spacecraft will then collect the same data during the first rendezvous with the heart of a comet. Artwork done for NASA by Pat Rawlings, of SAIC.
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