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Browse All : Images of Mediterranean Sea

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Eclipse View from the ISS
Eclipse View from the I...
6/9/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Flight Day 1
Flight Day 1
NASA
5/13/09
 
Year 2009
The Way Home
The Way Home
11/26/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Gaza Strip KidSat image
Gaza Strip KidSat image
1/22/97
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1997
Nile River, Sudan
Nile River, Sudan
12/6/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-33736 (25 February 2003) --- The boot of Italy crosses the image in this southwest-looking view taken by an Expedition Six crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The spine of Italy is highlighted with snow and the largely cloud-covered Mediterranean Sea is at the top. The Adriatic Sea transverses most of the bottom of the image and Sicily appears top left beyond the toe of the boot. The heel lies out of the left side of the image. Corsica and Sardinia appear right of center partly under cloud. The floor of the Po River valley, lower right, is obscured by haze. Experience gained from similar haze events, in which atmospheric pressure, humidity and visibility and atmospheric chemistry were known, suggests that the haze as industrial smog. Industrial haze from the urban region of the central and upper Po valley accumulates to visible concentrations under conditions of high atmospheric pressure and the surrounding mountains prevent easy dispersal. This view illustrates the markedly different color and texture of cloud versus industrial aerosol haze.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-11144 (11 Dec. 2005) --- Sierra Nevada, Spain is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Sierra Nevada, part of the Betic Cordillera of southern Spain, was formed during the Alpine Orogeny (or mountain-building event) that also formed the European Alps to the east and the Atlas Mountains of northern Africa across the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The Sierra as observed today formed during the Tertiary Period (65 to 1.8 million years ago) during collision of the African and Eurasian continental plates. The former Tethys Sea also closed during this time period, the scientists say, and the Mediterranean Sea is the largest surviving remnant basin of the ancient Tethys. The Sierra Nevada in the Granada province of Spain is perhaps the southernmost skiing location in all of Europe. Veleta Peak, at an elevation of 3,398 meters above sea level, is a popular destination for skiers and snowboarders. The rapid transition from lofty ski runs to Mediterranean beaches within a few hours? drive has made the Sierra Nevada region popular for both outdoor and urban tourism. This photograph depicts the Veleta Peak region of the range and illustrates the sharp contrast between the snow capped mountains, adjacent dry lowlands to the west and north, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south.
International Space Sta...
2006-03-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-21343 (29 Mar. 2006) --- The shadow of the moon falls on Earth as seen from the International Space Station, 230 miles above the planet, during a total solar eclipse at about 4:50 a.m. CST Wednesday, March 29. This digital photo was taken by the Expedition 12 crew, Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev, who are wrapping up a six-month mission on the complex. Visible near the shadow are portions of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea and the coast of Turkey.
International Space Sta...
2004-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-09954 (3 June 2004) --- Large internal waves in the Strait of Gibraltar are featured in this scene photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). These subsurface internal waves occur at depths of about 100 meters, but appear in the sun glint as giant swells flowing eastward into the Mediterranean Sea. This image was merged with image ISS009-E-09952 to create a mosaic, which can be viewed on http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov.
International Space Sta...
2004-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-09952 (3 June 2004) --- Large internal waves in the Strait of Gibraltar are featured in this scene photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). These subsurface internal waves occur at depths of about 100 meters, but appear in the sun glint as giant swells flowing eastward into the Mediterranean Sea. This image was merged with image ISS009-E-09954 to create a mosaic, which can be viewed on http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov.
International Space Sta...
2004-08-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS009-E-09985 (3 June 2004) --- The Ebro River Delta, located along the eastern coast of Spain, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Taken in partial sun glint, this view defines the Ebro?s fresh water lens? the water density boundary between the upper layer of fresh water issuing from the Ebro River mouth and the saltier, denser Mediterranean Sea water. According to NASA geologists studying the ISS imagery, diversion and impoundment of the Ebro River upstream has led to a decrease in water and sediment delivery to the delta. This decrease has led to increased erosion in some areas to the northeast of El Fangar Bay and along the southwestern shoreline of the delta. The Ebro River Delta is one of the largest wetland areas in the western Mediterranean region. The Ebro delta has grown rapidly?the historical rate of growth of the delta is demonstrated by the city of Amposta. This city was a seaport in the 4th Century, and is now located well inland from the current Ebro river mouth. The rounded form of the delta attests to the balance between sediment deposition by the Ebro River and removal of this material by wave erosion. The modern delta is in intensive agricultural use for rice, fruit, and vegetables. White polygonal areas to the north and south of the Ebro River are paddy fields. The Ebro delta also hosts numerous beaches, marshes, and saltpans that provide habitat for over 300 species of birds. A large part of the delta was designated as Parc Natural del Delta de l'Ebre (Ebre Delta National Park) in 1983. A network of canals and irrigation ditches constructed by both agricultural and conservation groups are helping to maintain the ecologic and economic resources of the Ebro Delta.
International Space Sta...
2006-03-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-21351 (29 Mar. 2006) --- The shadow of the moon falls on Earth as seen from the International Space Station, 230 miles above the planet, during a total solar eclipse at about 4:50 a.m. CST Wednesday, March 29. This digital photo was taken by the Expedition 12 crew, Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev, who are wrapping up a six-month mission on the complex. Part of the Mediterranean Sea can be seen outside the shadow.
International Space Sta...
2006-06-23 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-34753 (8 June 2006) --- Carthage, Tunisia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The favorable location of the ancient city of Carthage is clear in this image. Embayments along the coastline provided ready access to the Gulf of Tunis/Mediterranean Sea to the east and southeast. Docks along the coastline (lower right) support the shipping industry. Modern Carthage is a wealthy suburb of the Tunis metropolitan area (the center of which is located to the southwest of the image), as evidenced by dense concentrations of white building rooftops in residential subdivisions to the north and south of the ancient city location. Large tracts of new developments appear to be in progress along the curving, light colored roadways to the southwest of the historical city (lower center). The green shallow waters of an evaporating saline lake are visible at image left ? several such lakes are present in Tunisia and are centers for bird watching-related tourism.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-01 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-44847 (30 June 2006) --- Ship traffic on the Suez Canal, Egypt is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. This oblique photograph captures a northbound convoy of cargo ships entering the Mediterranean Sea from the Suez Canal in Egypt (leftmost canal branch at image center). Oblique images are taken at an angle other than vertical, or nadir -- looking down a line connecting the station to the point on the Earth's surface directly below it -- and this provides a sense of perspective. In this case, the station was located above the eastern coast of Cyprus and the crewmember was looking at Egypt to the southwest. Regions of reduced clarity in the image are caused by thin variable cloud cover. The Suez Canal connects Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea with the port of Suez on the Red Sea, and provides an essentially direct route for transport of goods between Europe and Asia. The Canal is 163 kilometers long and 300 meters wide at its narrowest point -- sufficiently wide for ships as large as aircraft carriers to traverse it. Transit time from end to end is 14 hours on average.
International Space Sta...
2006-11-02 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-76441 (4 Sept. 2006) --- Aquaculture in the Nile delta, Egypt is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. In the last three decades, a series of lagoons and lakes with greater and lesser connection to the sea have been greatly modified for the production of fish along the northeast coast of the Nile delta. Partial sunglint in this image reveals numerous details in one such fishery. Waves generated by northwesterly winds (lower left to upper right) have generated the frond-like sand spit along the coast (top). Faint sea swells are visible at upper left. Dark patches in the center are shadows cast by small clouds (also visible as dull white masses against the silver-grey sunglint). Dark curved lines on the inshore (western) side of the spit show prior positions of the spit. Most of Musallas Lagoon occupies the lower half of the image. By contrast with spit, the shores of the lagoon are everywhere occupied by a network of man-made structures--mainly short dikes enclosing hundreds of aquaculture ponds. The total area under fish production is estimated to be 8,000 hectares in the lagoon, which provides more than half of the aquaculture production for Egypt, largely in the form of two species of mullet. An outlet to the Mediterranean Sea (top right), allows sea-water recharge to the lagoon. Wind helps to circulate the water in this shallow lagoon--bright wind streaks on the lagoon (lower left) show this circulation driven by the north-northwest wind on this day.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-77377 (5 Sept. 2006) --- Bernese Alps, Switzerland is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. The formidable mountain system of the Alps stretches across much of central Europe, with seven countries claiming portions of the mountains within their borders (Germany, France, Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, and Slovenia). The glacial landscape of the Bernese Alps, located in southwestern Switzerland, is well illustrated by this view. The image was taken by a crewmember looking north-northwest while the station was located over the Mediterranean Sea between Corsica and Italy -- this oblique viewing angle imparts a sense of perspective to the image. This type of viewing angle complements more nadir (downward)--viewing imagery of the region. Three of the higher peaks of the central Alps are visible--Jungfrau (4,158 meters), Moench (4,089 meters), and Eiger (3,970 meters). To the east and south of the Jungfrau is the Aletsch Glacier, clearly marked by dark medial moraines extending along the glacier's length parallel to the valley axis. The moraines are formed from rock and soil debris collected along the sides of three mountain glaciers located near the Jungfrau and Moench peaks -- as these flowing ice masses merge to form the Aletsch Glacier, the debris accumulates in the middle of the glacier and is carried along the flow direction. According to geologists, Lake Brienz to the northwest was formed by the actions of both glacial ice and the flowing waters of the Aare and Lutschine rivers, and has a maximum depth of 261 meters. The lake has a particularly fragile ecosystem, as demonstrated by the almost total collapse of the whitefish population in 1999. Possible causes for the collapse, according to the scientists, include increased water turbidity associated with upstream hydropower plant operations, and reduction of phosphorus (a key nutrient for lake algae, a basic element of the local food web) due to water quality concerns.
International Space Sta...
2007-01-08 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-06812 (30 Oct. 2006) --- Gibraltar Bay, located near the southernmost tip of the Iberian Peninsula in the western Mediterranean Sea, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the famous Rock of Gibraltar that forms the northeastern border of the Bay is formed of Jurassic seafloor sediments that were lithified to form limestone (a rock formed predominantly of the mineral calcite) and subsequently uplifted as a result of collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates. The cities of La Linea and Algeciras bordering the Bay -- together with petroleum-processing facilities along the northern Bay shoreline -- are part of Spain, whereas the city of Gibraltar itself (to the west of and including the Rock) is under the jurisdiction of the United Kingdom. The protected waters of the Bay and its proximity to Africa and the Strait of Gibraltar as the gateway between the Atlantic and Mediterranean contribute to the region's past and current strategic and economic importance. Numerous ships and several ship wakes are visible within the Bay; the majority of these are freighters and cargo tankers accessing the petroleum facilities. Ships nearer to the Rock are more likely cruise ships, as Gibraltar is a popular destination for tourists. Partial sunglint within the Bay highlights surface water roughened by winds funneled into the Bay by the surrounding highlands -- one such area is visible directly to the west of La Linea.
STS-73 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS073-723-054 (20 OCTOBER - 5 NOVEMBER 1995) --- Central Turkey dominates this north-looking panorama, with the long fingered island of Cyprus lower left, surrounded by the deep blue waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Turkey's capital, Ankara, lies just north of the white bed of a dry lake in the center of the view. The city is supplied with water from the neighboring blue lake. The coast of Syria and Lebanon appear bottom right. Man-made lakes on the upper Euphrates River in eastern Turkey appear extreme right.. According to scientists studying the STS-73 photo collection, the striking difference in visibility to north and south of Turkey suggests a pollution event over the Black Sea. Air pollution from East European industry flows down into the Black Sea basin, especially at the west end (haze top left) as shown in this view (compare clearer air top right).
STS-73 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS073-708-089 (20 OCTOBER - 5 NOVEMBER 1995) --- As evidenced by this 70mm photograph from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia, international borders have become easier to see from space in recent decades. This, according to NASA scientists studying the STS-73 photo collection, is particularly true in arid and semi-arid environments. The scientists go on to cite this example of the razor-sharp vegetation boundary between southern Israel and Gaza and the Sinai. The nomadic grazing practices to the south (the lighter areas of the Sinai and Gaza, top left) have removed most of the vegetation from the desert surface. On the north side of the border, Israel uses advanced irrigation techniques in Israel, mainly "trickle irrigation" by which small amounts of water are delivered directly to plant roots. These water-saving techniques have allowed precious supplies from the Jordan River to be used on farms throughout the country. Numerous fields of dark green can be seen in this detailed view. Scientists say this redistribution of the Jordan River waters has increased the Israeli vegetation cover to densities that approach those that may have been common throughout the Mid-East in wetter early Biblical times. A small portion of the Mediterranean Sea appears top right.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-782-050 The Island of Cyprus September 1996 Covering an area of 3578 sq. miles (9267 sq. km) and located in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, the island of Cyprus can be seen in this northeast-looking view. Cyprus is located 40 miles (60 km) south of Turkey and 60 miles (100 km) west of Syria. There are three main geographic regions on Cyprus. The Troodos Massif, consisting of mostly volcanic rock and some limestone, traverses the southwest portion of the island (darker feature near the center of the image). Iron and copper pyrites are found in the foothills and asbestos and chromium in the higher slopes of the Troodos. The highest elevation in the massif is 6406 feet (1953 meters). Numerous government-owned forests cover the Troodos Massif. On the north coast is the Kyrenia Range, a narrow mountain range reaching elevations of 3000 feet (1000 meters). Consisting mainly of limestone, the range is wooded. Between the two mountain ranges is the Central Plain, where seventy percent of the island?s agriculture is located. The capital city of Cyprus, Nicosia, is situated on the Central Plain. The plain consists of a limestone crust and is considered a flat tableland. Heavily forested in ancient times, today the plain is almost treeless.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS106-706-055 (8-20 September 2000) --- One of the STS-106 crew members on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis used a handheld 70mm camera to photograph this image of the Etna Volcano on Sicily. Mt. Etna is known as the volcano with the longest record of volcanic activity with the first being in 1500 BC. It has erupted many times since then and is almost continuously venting gas and steam, as shown in this view. Astronauts can almost be assured of seeing some venting whenever they fly in orbit. Mt. Etna appears as a cone with an almost circular base in this near-vertical view. The Salso River winds around the western and southern flanks of the volcano. The city of Catania appears as a diffuse gray patch at the foot of the volcano where the river meets the Mediterranean Sea. Mt. Etna has a complex of cones at its summit, which is nearly 3300 meters above sea level. Its slopes are a patchwork of colors, the darker colors being lava flows of different ages. Greens are patches of forest on slopes which have not been disrupted by lava and ash in the last few decades. Mt. Etna is a constructional landform which has been built upwards for millennia; it contrasts subtly but distinctly in this view with the surrounding lower hills which are water-eroded landforms everywhere sculpted into V-shaped valleys by the erosive power of flowing water of streams.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-024 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the Sinai Peninsula and the Dead Sea Rift. The left side of the view is dominated by the great triangle of the Sinai peninsula, which is partly obscured by an unusual cloud mass on this day. The famous Monastery of St. Catherine lies in the very remote, rugged mountains in the southern third of the peninsula (foreground). The Gulf of Aqaba is a finger of the Red Sea bottom center, pointing north to the Dead Sea, the small body of water near the center of the view. According to NASA scientists studying the STS-109 photo collection, the gulf and the Dead Sea are northerly extensions of the same geological rift that resulted in the opening of the Red Sea . The Gulf of Suez appears in the lower left corner. Northwest Saudi Arabia occupies the lower right side of the view, Jordan and Syria the right and top right, and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea the top left. Thin white lines of cloud have formed along the coastal mountains of southern Turkey and stretch across the top of the view near the Earth's limb.
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS110-738-052 (8-19 April 2002) --- The major portion of the 180-mile (290 kilometers) long Gulf of Suez (center of the image) can be seen in this north-looking view, captured on film by one of the STS-110 crewmembers on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis . The Gulf of Suez is considered to be one of the most important water transportation routes in the world, connecting the Mediterranean Sea (upper portion of the image) through the Suez Canal (mostly covered by clouds) with the Red Sea (not visible on the image) and the Indian Ocean. To the gulf's right (east), the rugged landscape of the Sinai Peninsula can be seen. The 100 mile (160 kilometers) long Gulf of Aqaba, which is part of the Great Rift Valley of Eastern Africa, is discernible at the lower right of the image. Near the upper right portion of the image, a distinct line marking the border between Israel and Egypt can be seen. To the left (west) of the Gulf of Suez, are the Western Desert and the Nile River Valley and Delta of eastern Egypt. The tail of the Space Shuttle is at the right center of the image.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS112-702-002 (7-18 October 2002) --- Egypt's triangular Sinai Peninsula lies in the center of this view, photographed from the Space Shuttle Atlantis, with the dark greens of the Nile delta lower right. In this southwesterly view, the Red Sea, with its characteristic parallel coastlines, stretches toward the top. At the bottom of the image, the Suez Canal appears as an irregular line joining the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea (lower left). The Dead Sea in central Israel, with its light blue salt ponds at the south end, appears on the left margin.
STS-113 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS113-332-035 (14 December 2002) --- The STS-113 crewmembers used a 35mm still camera to record this image of Mt. Etna Volcano erupting on the island of Sicily. The oblique, south-looking view shows Mt. Etna's dark ash plume rising above the general altitude of storm clouds over the Mediterranean Sea at sunset on Dec. 14, 2002.
STS-113 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS113-348-012 (3 December 2002) --- The STS-113 crewmembers used a 35mm still camera to record this image of a mid latitude storm system. The counter-clockwise swirl shows that this is a northern hemisphere storm. The storm was northeast of the Mediterranean Sea, covering the Balkans and western Turkey. The view was taken looking northwest in the early afternoon of Dec 3, 2002.
STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-08-31 0:0:0
 
Description STS121-334-026 (4-17 July 2006) --- This photo, featuring an easterly view of the Nile River, the Nile River Delta, Sinai Peninsula, the Suez Canal, Red Sea and part of the Mediterranean Sea, was taken by one of the STS-121 crewmembers aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. Cairo, Egypt, can be seen at far right.
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