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Browse All : Images of Mongolia

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Aug. 1 Solar Eclipse Image Sequence
Aug. 1 Solar Eclipse Im...
8/4/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Tuva, Central Asia L & C bands
Tuva, Central Asia L & ...
7/18/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Dust clouds over eastern China
Dust clouds over easter...
5/9/01
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2001
International Space Sta...
2005-05-27 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-08497 (24 November 2004) --- This picture, apparently the first verifiable photo showing the Great Wall of China from low earth orbit, was taken by International Space Station Commander Leroy Chiao. Chiao used a digital still camera with a 400mm lens when he snapped the photo early in the Expedition 10 mission on Nov. 24, 2004. The land mass featured is in the central part of Inner Mongolia, about 200 miles north of Beijing. A small section of the wall is visible just below true center of the photo at 42.5 degrees north latitude and 117.4 east longitude, according to NASA scientists studying the Space Station imagery.
International Space Sta...
2006-04-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-18779 (28 Feb. 2006) --- Winter in the Dasht-e-Lut Desert, eastern Iran is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. The image takes advantage of the low angle of illumination to reveal linear geological structures of the Iranian mountain range bordering the western edge of the basin known as Dasht-e-Lut. The range rises 1818 meters (6000 feet) above sea level and lies 750 kilometers (466 miles) north of the Persian Gulf. The convoluted appearance results from erosion of folded and faulted rocks ? softer rocks erode away quickly, leaving more resistant rock to form linear ridges perpendicular to the direction of compression. While not a major oil producing region like the Zagros Fold Belt to the southwest, the mountains of east-central Iran contain economically important deposits of copper and other metals. Little vegetation is visible from space in the arid interior basin of the Dasht-e-Lut. Iran is climatically part of the Afro-Asian belt of deserts that stretch from the Cape Verde islands off West Africa all the way to Mongolia near Beijing. The patchy, elongated, light-colored feature in the foreground (parallel to the mountain range) is the northernmost of the Dasht dry lakes that stretch southward 300 kilometers (186 miles). High country is the source of precipitation-derived water in all near-tropical deserts. Agricultural fields (small dark patches in the image) that depend on this precipitation are located down slope near the margin of the dry, salty soils of the lake.
International Space Sta...
2006-05-15 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-21250 (2 March 2006) --- Dust and smog in northeast China are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crewmember on the International Space Station. Much of the land surface is obscured in this oblique image of the North China Plain and parts of Inner Mongolia. In the center of the view a mass of gray smog?mainly industrial pollution and smoke from domestic burning?obscures Beijing and surrounding cities. Numerous plumes with their source points appear within the mass. Beijing suffers some of the worst air pollution in the world from these chronic sources, and the characteristic colors and textures of the smog can be easily seen through windows of the International Space Station. The coastline of Bo Hai Bay, 300 kilometers east of Beijing, is visible at left. The light brown material in Bo Hai Bay is sediment from the Yellow and other rivers. Separated from the smog mass by a band of puffy, white cumulus clouds is a light brown plume of dust. The line of white cloud has developed along the escarpment that separates the heavily populated North China Plain ? location of the largest population agglomeration on Earth ? and the sparsely populated semi-desert plains of Inner Mongolia. Observers saw a number of dust events in most Northern Hemisphere deserts in the spring of 2006, and the Gobi and the Takla Makan deserts of western China were no exception. Dust plumes originating in these deserts typically extend eastward hundreds of kilometers, regularly depositing dust on Beijing, the Korean peninsula and Japan. Some plumes even extend over the Pacific Ocean. In extreme cases, visible masses of Gobi-derived dust have reached North America.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-78506 (7 Sept. 2006) --- Sand dunes near Mongolia's Har Lake are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. Har (or Black) Lake is located in the western part of the country within the Valley of Lakes--part of a system of closed basins that stretches across central Asia. According to scientists, these basins are the remnants of larger paleolakes that had begun to shrink in size by approximately five thousand years ago as regional climate became drier. Today, the Valley of Lakes is an important ecological resource for study of steppe grasslands, and as resting points for large numbers of migratory birds. Portions of the basin are designated as national parks or other protected areas, and Har Lake itself is an ecotourism destination (usually by horseback). This oblique view captures the dynamic nature of the landscape of Har Lake. The lake is encircled by sand dune fields which encroach on the lower slopes of the Tobhata Mountains to the west and south. Gaps in the mountains have been exploited by sand dunes moving eastward (indicating westerly winds) -- the most striking example being a series of dunes entering Har Lake along its southwestern shoreline. Here, the dune forms reflect the channeling of winds through the break in the mountain ridgeline, leading to dune crests oriented transverse to northwesterly winds. Another well-developed line of dunes is visible between Har and Baga Lakes. While these dunes appear to cut across a lake surface, the dunes have in fact moved across a narrow stream channel.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02745 (14 February 2000) --- SRTM X-SAR achieved the (left) high- resolution image of Uvs Nuur Basin in Mongolia. The coordinates of the location are 91 degrees, 36 minutes east longitude and 50 degrees, 12 minutes north latitude. Horizontal resolution for the left image is 25 meters, compared to 1000 meters for the global elevation (GLOBE) model at right. Note: All X-SAR imagery and related charts and maps are provided by DLR, Germany's national aerospace resource center as well as the national space agency.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02751 --- The SRTM image seen in JSC2000-E-02760 falls within the rectangle marked on this relief representation of a part of Mongolia. Note: All X-SAR imagery and related charts and maps are provided by DLR, Germany's national aerospace resource center as well as the national space agency.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02760 --- X-SAR/SRTM image of Mongolia covers an area reaching from the Tagnyn Nuruu Range in the northwest to the Toktokhyn Shil Range and the Uvs Nuur Lake in the southeast showing height differences of more then 2500 meters. The temperatures in this area go down to -57.3 degrees Fahrenheit, even though its latitude is the same as that of Vancouver, Canada. Note: All X-SAR imagery and related charts and maps are provided by DLR, Germany's national aerospace resource center as well as the national space agency.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02750 --- This ground scene covers swamps along Mongolia's Uvs Nuur Lake appearing during the summer as well as steppes and semi-arid areas along the foot of the mountains. The vegetation strongly depends on the elevation and the exposition of the mountain slopes. Larch forests can be found on wet north-oriented slopes while steppe vegetation grows on dry southern slopes. The transition zone is covered by grassland. Due to the rough climate the larches grow only a few millimeters per year but live for more then 400 years. Because of its unique diversity in landscape and vegetation this area is now an UNESCO protected reservation. Information on the Mongolian site was provided by Mr. Rolf Kastner, Institute for Geography of the Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Numberg, Germany. Note: All X-SAR imagery and related charts and maps are provided by DLR, Germany's national aerospace resource center as well as the national space agency.
STS-117 Shuttle Mission...
2007-08-15 0:0:0
 
Description S117-E-06998 (10 June 2007) --- Polar Mesospheric Clouds are featured in this image photographed by a STS-117 crewmember onboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sometimes in the summertime in the far northern (or southern) latitudes, high in the Earth's atmosphere at the edge of space, thin silvery clouds form and are observed just after sunset. These high clouds, occurring at altitudes of about 80 kilometers (50 miles), are called Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) or noctilucent clouds, and are the subject of new studies to determine whether their occurrence is related to global climate change. Observations over the past few years suggest that PMC are now observed more frequently and at lower latitudes than historical observations. Several studies related to the International Polar Year (IPY), and the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) spacecraft are underway to collect relevant data on the chemistry and physics of the mesosphere that might explain the occurrence of PMC. Astronauts in orbiting spacecraft frequently observe PMC over Canada, northern Europe and Asia during June, July and August. While PMC also occur over the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere in December, January and February, astronaut observations of southern PMC are less frequent. Earlier in June 2007, the shuttle crew visiting the International Space Station observed spectacular PMC over north-central Asia. This image was taken looking north while the shuttle and station were docking and flying over the border between western China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan. The red-to-dark region at the bottom of the image is the dense part of the Earth's atmosphere. Because this image was taken with a long lens (180mm), the entire profile of the Earth's limb is not captured. To support IPY research over the next 2 years, station crewmembers will be looking for and documenting PMC in both hemispheres.
STS-101 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS101-720-58 (26 May 2000) --- The International Space Station is photographed just after separation from the Space Shuttle Atlantis over Mongolia. Featured in the 70mm frame is the Lake Hovsgol rift valley. A long, straight transform fault zone connects the Hovsgol and Baykal rift valleys. Lake Baykal is 200 kilmeters east of Lake Volsgol.
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