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Browse All : Images of Montreal

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Great Balls of Fire! Hubble Sees Bright Knots Ejected From Brilliant Star
Great Balls of Fire! Hu...
M1-67
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
Great Balls of Fire! Hubble Sees Bright Knots Ejected From Brilliant Star
Great Balls of Fire! Hu...
M1-67
2008-02-14 0:0:0
 
International Space Sta...
2007-02-06 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-12686 (21 Jan. 2007) --- This wintry scene of Quebec Province in Canada was photographed by one of the Expedition 14 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. In 1535 Jacques Cartier landed on an island in the St. Lawrence River and named a 233 meter-high mountain Mount Royal. Montreal is a city on that island that grew up around the mountain. The city of Montreal (near center frame) is located on the Ile de Montreal to the northwest of the St. Lawrence river (the wider body of water). It was not until 1642 that Ville Marie, founded by missionaries, would officially become the city of Montreal. The cityscape contrasts well with the farmland and natural forests in this summer view. Today Montreal is the largest city in the province of Quebec, and is the second most populous metropolitan area in Canada -- in 1991 the population was just more than one million in the city and 3,127,242 in the metropolitan area. While owing its early growth to the fur trade, the city is a leading producer of aircraft, chemical and pharmaceutical products, and is a major petroleum production center. Nearly half of Canada's $5.8 billion aerospace industry is located in the Montreal area.
International Space Sta...
2007-05-31 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-19807 (18 April 2007) --- Monteregian Hills, Quebec, Canada are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. This view captures two striking patterns, pointed out by NASA scientists who study the shuttle and station photography. The circular features are the central members of the Monteregian Hills located to the east of Montreal--Mont St. Hilaire, Rougemont, and Mont Yamaska. The rectangular pattern records the intensive agricultural land use of the fertile lowlands in southern Quebec. The Monteregian Hills are an isolated series of roughly east-west trending plutons--masses of igneous rock that crystallized below the land surface--located near Montreal. According to the scientists, magmas forming the Hills were intruded into pre-existing sedimentary rocks during the Cretaceous Era (roughly 123-125 million years ago). Over time, the sedimentary rock has eroded away, leaving the more resistant igneous rock of the plutons exposed as the Monteregian Hills in the surrounding flat St. Lawrence Plains. Rocks of these three plutons record a transition from silica-poor magmas (little to no minerals such as quartz or feldspar) to silica-rich magmas (abundant quartz and feldspar) along the line of the Hills. Snow cover on the three mountains provides additional contrast with surrounding tan to brown fallow agricultural fields. The city of Granby, Quebec is visible at left. In addition to their interesting geology, the Monteregian Hills also serve as important woodland habitat "islands" in the greater Montreal urban area.
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS085-506-081 (7-19 August 1997) --- Montreal is a city on an island that grew up around the mountain -- in 1535 Jacques Cartier landed on an island in the St. Lawrence River and named a 233 meter-high mountain Mount Royal. It was not until 1642 that Ville Marie, founded by missionaries, would officially become the city of Montreal. The cityscape contrasts well with the farmland and natural forests in this summer view. Today Montreal is the largest city in the province of Quebec, and is the second most populous metropolitan area in Canada -- in 1991 the population was just more than one million in the city and 3,127,242 in the metropolitan area. While owing its early growth to the fur trade, the city is a leading producer of aircraft, chemical and pharmaceutical products, and is a major petroleum production center. Nearly half of Canada's .8 billion aerospace industry is located in the Montreal area. In the image captured by the astronauts, the lighter blue, wide river is the St. Lawrence. The city of Montreal is located on the Ile de Montreal to the northwest of the St. Lawrence river. The Ottawa River enters the St. Lawrence near the center of the view. Mirabel International Airport stands out well, on the north side of the city. The long, narrow strips of land in the image are indicative of French agricultural land use. The narrow ends of farmlands are oriented perpendicular to rivers so that more farmers will have access to water resources.
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