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Browse All : Images of Nevada

1-36 of 36
Earth Resources Project
Earth Resources Project
3/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
ER-2
ER-2
2/19/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
The Original Seven
The Original Seven
11/27/07
NASA
 
Year 2007
Lower Colorado River L & C bands
Lower Colorado River L ...
1/25/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Mammoth land cover map
Mammoth land cover map
4/16/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Mammoth Mountain, Calif. L, C bands
Mammoth Mountain, Calif...
10/10/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Mammoth Mountain, Calif. Seasonal Changes
Mammoth Mountain, Calif...
10/10/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Mammoth/C-band multipol
Mammoth/C-band multipol
4/13/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
May 2000 Nevada Field Test
May 2000 Nevada Field T...
5/17/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
May 2000 Nevada Field Test
May 2000 Nevada Field T...
5/16/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
May 2000 Nevada Field Test
May 2000 Nevada Field T...
5/15/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
May 2000 Nevada Field Test
May 2000 Nevada Field T...
5/15/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
Perspective View, Garlock Fault
Perspective View, Garlo...
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
SRTM/Swath Comparison
SRTM/Swath Comparison
7/15/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Nuclear Rocket Engine Being Transported to Test Stand
Nuclear Rocket Engine B...
Rocket Propulsion
12/01/1967
AEC-NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
XECF
XECF
Rocket Propulsion
12/01/1967
AEC-NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Drawing of a NERVA Engine
Drawing of a NERVA Engi...
Rocket Propulsion
01/29/1970
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Kiwi-A Prime Atomic Reactor
Kiwi-A Prime Atomic Rea...
Rocket Propulsion
1960
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Destruction of KIWI Nuclear Reactor
Destruction of KIWI Nuc...
Rocket Propulsion
01/12/1965
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
NASA Astronauts Desert Survival Training
NASA Astronauts Desert ...
Astronauts
1/1/1964
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
ACC-00281-107
ACC-00281-107
6/1/72
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1972
ACC-00281-107
ACC-00281-107
6/1/72
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1972
ACC 00281-107
ACC 00281-107
6/1/72
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1972
ACD07-0049-011
ACD07-0049-011
3/16/07
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 2007
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Day after day of stormy...
TRMM
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS090-756-046 (17 April - 3 May 1998) --- A 70mm view of the Las Vegas, Nevada area, including the western-most tip of Lake Mead. The flight track of the Space Shuttle Columbia and lack of heavy cloud cover during the 16-day Neurolab mission allowed the astronauts a number of opportunities to photograph North American cities.
International Space Sta...
2005-07-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-09680 (27 June 2005) --- Searles Lake, California is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station. Searles Lake is known for the abundance of rare elements and evaporite minerals, such as trona, hanksite, and halite formed within its sediments. These minerals dissolve in water or very humid environments. According to NASA scientists who are studying the Space Station photography, during the Pleistocene Epoch (beginning approximately two million years ago), Searles Lake was one of a chain of lakes fed by streamflow from the Sierra Nevada to the west. Lake levels rose and fell dependant on glacial outwash from the Sierra Nevada as climates shifted. Successive layers of sediment were deposited as lake levels fluctuated, preserving an important record of regional climate change. The lakes gradually dried up completely as climatic conditions became hotter and drier (as today), forming a string of enclosed basins with no outlets (playas). This photograph depicts the Searles Lake playa (characterized by white surface mineral deposits) bounded by the Argus and Slate Mountains. The width of the playa is approximately 10 kilometers. The center of the image is dominated by mining operations that extract sodium- and potassium-rich minerals (primarily borax and salt) for industrial use. Minerals are primarily in naturally-occurring brines that are pumped to the surface and evaporated to crystallize the minerals. A large evaporation pond (black) is visible in the center of the image. Further processing concentrates the minerals and removes excess water.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-09986 (11 July 2003) --- This view of Earth?s horizon was taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS) while the Station was in orbit over Dodge City, Kansas. In the lower right is the Great Salt Lake. At the left side in the distance are the Sierra Nevada Mountains with elevations between 12,000 and 15,000 feet, and coastal California.
International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-11144 (11 Dec. 2005) --- Sierra Nevada, Spain is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Sierra Nevada, part of the Betic Cordillera of southern Spain, was formed during the Alpine Orogeny (or mountain-building event) that also formed the European Alps to the east and the Atlas Mountains of northern Africa across the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The Sierra as observed today formed during the Tertiary Period (65 to 1.8 million years ago) during collision of the African and Eurasian continental plates. The former Tethys Sea also closed during this time period, the scientists say, and the Mediterranean Sea is the largest surviving remnant basin of the ancient Tethys. The Sierra Nevada in the Granada province of Spain is perhaps the southernmost skiing location in all of Europe. Veleta Peak, at an elevation of 3,398 meters above sea level, is a popular destination for skiers and snowboarders. The rapid transition from lofty ski runs to Mediterranean beaches within a few hours? drive has made the Sierra Nevada region popular for both outdoor and urban tourism. This photograph depicts the Veleta Peak region of the range and illustrates the sharp contrast between the snow capped mountains, adjacent dry lowlands to the west and north, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south.
International Space Sta...
2006-09-25 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-81687 (17 Sept. 2006) --- A forest fire in southern California is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The day fire started in Los Padres National Forest north of Los Angeles on Sept. 4, 2006. Easterly winds on Sept. 17 blew the smoke west out to sea, and this wind shift was observed by station crewmembers. The forested mountains north of Los Angeles appear dark green, the smoke a dusky gray. Dense farmland at the south end of California's central valley is framed by the forested Sierra Nevada mountain range. White patches near the center of the view are dry lakes of the Mojave Desert, one of which acts as a landing site for the space shuttle. The dark irregular shape at image right is part of the space station. Death Valley and Las Vegas are visible at image right. The extent of the day fire smoke plume can be gauged from the gray urban region of greater Los Angeles (center) which stretches along 50 miles of coastline. The plume obscures the northern Channel Islands, but the southern Channel Islands are silhouetted against the ocean.
STS-68 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS068-267-097 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- An extensive view eastward from the irrigated San Joaquin Valley in the foreground, across the Sierra Nevada (living up to its name in early October), into the desert of eastern California and Nevada (which has no snow, despite the name). Mono Lake is just visible at the left edge of the frame; Owens Valley extends southward to Owens Lake, the next valley is Panamint Valley, and then Death Valley. Las Vegas and Lake Mead are visible at the upper right of the frame. The Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) obtained extensive, multiple-pass data from many test sites within the region displayed, including Mammoth Mountain ski area south of Mono Lake, and in Death Valley.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-810-003 Lake Tahoe, California, USA September 1996 Located on the California-Nevada border (two thirds in California and one third in Nevada), Lake Tahoe (large dark blue feature in the center of image) measures about 22 miles (35 kilometers) long and 12 miles (19 kilometers) wide. Lake Tahoe?s average surface elevation is 6225 (1897 meters) above sea level and its maximum depth measures 1645 feet (501 meters), making the lake the third deepest lake in North America. The actual surface elevation of the lake is controlled by how much water flows into the lake from the surrounding mountains and how much water flows out of the lake and into the Truckee River controlled by the dam at Tahoe City. The Lake Tahoe Basin was created over millions of years by two major faulting events: the elevation of the Carson Range of mountains along the eastern margin of the basin and the development of the Sierra Nevada mountains along the western side of the basin. The gray waters of shallow Washoe Lake are in the bottom center of the photograph. Carson City, the capital of Nevada, can be seen as light gray areas in the desert valley to the east (left) of the Lake Tahoe, just south (above) Washoe Lake. The white object in the lower right corner of the picture is part of the Space Shuttle.
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS085-716-061 (7 - 19 August 1997) --- The dark green forests of the Sierra Nevada Mts. occupy the left side of the picture. Reno lies between Lake Tahoe (center) and Pyramid Lake (top right). Lake Tahoe, is a clear, deep alpine lake (over 505 meters deep), surrounded by Montane forest, ski resorts and casinos. Although Tahoe is known as one of the clearest lakes in the world, water quality in the lake has been declining due to soil erosion from development. Since 1968, it has lost about 30 feet of clarity. A partnership was recently formed between environmentalists and resort owners to protect their common interest in keeping the lake as clear as possible. Over the last five years they have slowed the erosion and the growth of algae that it causes so that clarity is now "only" lost at a rate of roughly one foot per year. Pyramid Lake (on the upper right of the photo) is as different from Tahoe as a lake could be. The sagebrush desert around the lake and is owned by the Pyramid Lake Paiute tribe who manage it as a fishery for an endangered sucker (fish), the cui-cui. The tribe has added modern fisheries' biology methods to their traditional management and chooses not to develop the lake as a recreation destination. Anaho Island, in the lower half of the lake, is a wildlife refuge managed for American White Pelicans which fly hundreds of miles each day to get from this safe breeding area to the shallow marshes where they feed. Directly above Lake Tahoe is Donner pass, near the site where the beleaguered Donner Party spent the winter of 1846 - 1847 trapped in the mountains. Several shallow ephemeral lakes can be seen in Lemmon Valley north of Reno's core urban area. These lakes would normally have dried up by August when this photo was taken, but are still wet because of the extremely wet winter and floods of January 1997.
International Space Sta...
2007-07-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-05815 (30 April 2007) --- Algae in Great Salt Lake, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Great Salt Lake of northern Utah is a remnant of glacial Lake Bonneville that extended over much of present-day western Utah, and into the neighboring states of Nevada and Idaho, approximately 32,000 to 14,000 years ago. During this time, the peaks of adjacent ranges such as the Promontory and Lakeside Mountains were most likely islands. As climate warmed and precipitation decreased in the region, glaciers that fed melt-water to Lake Bonneville disappeared, and the lake began to dry up. The present-day Great Salt Lake is a terminal lake in that water does not flow out of the lake basin. Water loss through the year is due primarily to evaporation, and when this loss exceeds input of water from rivers, streams, precipitation, and groundwater the lake level decreases. This is particularly evident during droughts. This process of evaporation, together with the relatively shallow water levels (maximum lake depth is around 33 feet), has led to increased salinity (dissolved salt content) of the lake waters. The north arm of the Lake, displayed in this image, typically has twice the salinity of the rest of the lake due to impoundment of water by a railroad causeway that crosses the lake from east to west. This restriction of water flow has led to a striking division in the types of algae and bacteria found in the north and south arms of the lake. In the northern arm (north of the causeway), the red algae Dunaliella Salina and the bacterial species Halo bacterium produce a pronounced reddish cast to the water, whereas the south arm (south of the causeway) is dominated by green algae such as Dunaliella viridis. The Great Salt Lake also supports brine shrimp and brine flies; and is a major stopover point for migratory birds including avocets, stilts, and plovers.
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