REFINE 

Browse All : Images of Pacific Ocean

101-104 of 104
1 2 3
STS-87 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS087-706-020 (19 November ? 5 December 1997) --- The Spartan 201 satellite, held in the grasp of the Space Shuttle Columbia's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, is backdropped over white clouds and blue waters of the Pacific Ocean. Long Island, off the coast of Papua New Guinea, is barely visible in the lower left corner.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS099-723-054 (11-22 February 2000) --- A wide-sweeping occlusion in the South Pacific Ocean caught the eye of one of the STS-99 crew members during the 11-day SRTM mission. The astronaut used a 70mm handheld camera to record the oblique scene.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS106-704-063 (9 September 2000) --- Typhoon Saomai swirls in the Pacific Ocean east of Taiwan and the Philippines. The typhoon was captured on film with a 70mm handheld camera by the STS-106 crew members aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on September. 9
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS112-704-142 (7-18 October 2002) --- (For orientation purposes, north is toward the top left corner). Green colors of the forests of the Cascade Mountains dominate this view, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis. Browner colors (top right) are the semiarid plains of the Columbia Basin, in the rain shadow of the Cascades. The highest peaks in this part of the Cascades are four volcanoes. The amount of snow is a good indication of their altitude. The highest is Mt. Rainier (14,410 feet) with the greatest amount of white snow (top left). Seattle lies immediately downslope (top left margin). Mt. Adams (12,276) lies due south in the middle of the view. Mt. Hood (11,235 feet) in the lower right corner, lies south of the great gorge of the Columbia River (which crosses the lower right and then the lower left corners of the view). The river flows broadly west (left) to the Pacific Ocean (out of the picture left). Mt. St Helens (8,364 feet), the snow-free brown patch lower left, was too low to retain snow after the recent fall. According to geologists studying the STS-112 photography, even from the altitude of the Space Shuttle, the intact south half of the cone can be discerned. The geologists point out that the famous blast of 1980 not only destroyed the north side of the cone but blew down the green forest for many square miles on the north side (brown signature).
101-104 of 104
1 2 3