REFINE 

Browse All : Images of Pacific Ocean

51-100 of 104
1 2 3  
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
Persistent Rains Bring Floods, Mudslides to California
Persistent Rains Bring ...
Another series of storm...<a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=12669"></a></a><a href="http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/"></a>
TRMM
 
Hurricane Darby
Hurricane Darby
The image above shows T...<A href="http://airs.jpl.nasa.gov/" target="outlink"></A>
Aqua- AIRS
 
Guinness World Records ...
n/a
 
The Panama Canal
The Panama Canal
NASA/U.S. Geological Su...
 
Year
1999
STS-91 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
NASA7-726-049 (May 1998) --- This view of a sunrise dissecting a line of airglow of Earth's atmosphere was taken as Russia's Mir space station was on a descending track toward Johnston Island in the central Pacific Ocean. The photo was brought back to Earth by astronaut Andrew S.W. Thomas, who spent four months aboard Mir before returning home with the STS-91 crew aboard Discovery. Photo credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Aviation and Space Agency.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS090-758-018 (17 April - 3 May 1998) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia was almost directly over the San Diego, California, area when this scene was captured with a 70mm handheld camera. In order for north to appear toward the top of the frame, it should be held with the Pacific Ocean waters to the left. The United States Naval Air Station, the United States Naval Training Center, United States Marine Corps (USMC) Recruit Depot and the United States Naval Station are all visible just left of center on or near the island and peninsula features. Among the many bodies of water visible in the photo are Mission Bay, San Diego Bay, Lower Otay Reservoir, Sweetwater Reservoir and El Capitan Reservoir.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS004-E-10288 (21 April 2002) --- This view featuring the San Francisco Bay Area was photographed by an Expedition 4 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The gray urban footprint of San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, and their surrounding suburbs contrasts strongly with the green hillsides. Of particular note are the Pacific Ocean water patterns that are highlighted in the sun glint. Sets of internal waves traveling east impinge on the coastline south of San Francisco. At the same time, fresher bay water flows out from the bay beneath the Golden Gate Bridge, creating a large plume traveling westward. Tidal current channels suggest the tidal flow deep in the bay. Because the ISS orbits are not synchronous with the sun, station crewmembers view Earth with variable solar illumination angles. This allows them to document phenomena such as the sun reflecting differentially off surface waters in a way that outlines complicated water structures.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-18 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS011-E-11227 (28 July 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station. On the left side of the image (under the left wing) is Lake Neuchatel, Switzerland. The city at the end of the lake is Yverdon. The Jura Mountains (most of the green portion of the background) are to the right in the image. Discovery later docked to the Station at 6:18 a.m. (CDT) on Thursday, July 28, 2005 as the two spacecraft orbited over the southern Pacific Ocean west of the South American coast. Onboard the Shuttle were astronauts Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander; James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Stephen K. Robinson, Wendy B. Lawrence, Charles J. Camarda and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, all mission specialists.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2006-02-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS011-E-11219 (28 July 2005) --- Overall view of the Space Shuttle Discovery as photographed during the survey operations performed by the Expedition 11 crew on the International Space Station during the STS-114 R-Bar Pitch Maneuver on Flight Day 3. Discovery docked to the station at 6:18 a.m. (CDT) on Thursday, July 28, 2005 as the two spacecraft orbited over the southern Pacific Ocean west of the South American coast. Onboard the shuttle were astronauts Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander; James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Stephen K. Robinson, Wendy B. Lawrence, Charles J. Camarda and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, all mission specialists. The Italian-built Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is visible in the cargo bay.
International Space Sta...
2005-09-09 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS011-E-12343 (3 September 2005) --- Typhoon Nabi is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station, as it swirls in the Pacific Ocean, heading toward southern Korea and Japan. At the time this image was taken Typhoon Nabi was ~23N 133E with sustained winds ~100 knots, gusting to 120 knots.
International Space Sta...
2005-09-09 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS011-E-12347 (3 September 2005) --- Typhoon Nabi is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station, as it swirls in the Pacific Ocean, heading toward southern Korea and Japan. At the time this image was taken Typhoon Nabi was ~23N 133E with sustained winds ~100 knots, gusting to 120 knots.
International Space Sta...
2005-10-14 0:0:0
 
Description
[ISS006-E-44980 (10 March 2003) --- A close up view of water droplets on leaves on the Russian BIO-5 Rasteniya-2/Lada-2 (Plants-2) plant growth experiment, which is located in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS)., ISS011-E-13551 (24 September 2005) --- Typhoon 18W Saola is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station, as it swirls in the Pacific Ocean, heading toward southern Japan.]
International Space Sta...
2005-10-14 0:0:0
 
Description
[ISS006-E-44980 (10 March 2003) --- A close up view of water droplets on leaves on the Russian BIO-5 Rasteniya-2/Lada-2 (Plants-2) plant growth experiment, which is located in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS)., ISS011-E-13723 (29 September 2005) --- Typhoon Longwang is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station, as it swirls in the Pacific Ocean.]
International Space Sta...
2005-10-14 0:0:0
 
Description
[ISS006-E-44980 (10 March 2003) --- A close up view of water droplets on leaves on the Russian BIO-5 Rasteniya-2/Lada-2 (Plants-2) plant growth experiment, which is located in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS)., ISS011-E-13727 (29 September 2005) --- Typhoon Longwang is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station, as it swirls in the Pacific Ocean.]
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS007-E-07304 (13 June 2003) --- This view of Earth?s horizon was taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS), using a wide-angle lens while the Station was over the Pacific Ocean. In the foreground are the atolls of Tabiteuea and Onotoa.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS007-E-10807 (21 July 2003) --- This view of Earth?s horizon as the sunsets over the Pacific Ocean was taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Anvil tops of thunderclouds are also visible.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS008-E-12372 (10 January 2004) --- The Biobio River in Chile was featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 8 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The river flows northwestward from the high Cordillera of the Andes to the Pacific Ocean near Concepcion, about 450 kilometers south of Santiago. This image shows a section of the river that skirts around Antuco volcano in the Andes, and features the Pangue dam and reservoir filling a narrow, meandering segment of the Biobio River valley. Upstream from the Pangue Reservoir (right frame), the cleared areas associated with earth moving and construction of the Ralco Dam are visible. The straight white lines in cleared forest between the two dams probably represent power transmission lines.
International Space Sta...
2006-05-15 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS012-E-21250 (2 March 2006) --- Dust and smog in northeast China are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crewmember on the International Space Station. Much of the land surface is obscured in this oblique image of the North China Plain and parts of Inner Mongolia. In the center of the view a mass of gray smog?mainly industrial pollution and smoke from domestic burning?obscures Beijing and surrounding cities. Numerous plumes with their source points appear within the mass. Beijing suffers some of the worst air pollution in the world from these chronic sources, and the characteristic colors and textures of the smog can be easily seen through windows of the International Space Station. The coastline of Bo Hai Bay, 300 kilometers east of Beijing, is visible at left. The light brown material in Bo Hai Bay is sediment from the Yellow and other rivers. Separated from the smog mass by a band of puffy, white cumulus clouds is a light brown plume of dust. The line of white cloud has developed along the escarpment that separates the heavily populated North China Plain ? location of the largest population agglomeration on Earth ? and the sparsely populated semi-desert plains of Inner Mongolia. Observers saw a number of dust events in most Northern Hemisphere deserts in the spring of 2006, and the Gobi and the Takla Makan deserts of western China were no exception. Dust plumes originating in these deserts typically extend eastward hundreds of kilometers, regularly depositing dust on Beijing, the Korean peninsula and Japan. Some plumes even extend over the Pacific Ocean. In extreme cases, visible masses of Gobi-derived dust have reached North America.
International Space Sta...
2007-09-05 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS015-E-16913 (10 July 2007) --- Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russian Far East is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Shiveluch is one of the biggest and most active of a line of volcanoes along the spine of the Kamchatka peninsula in easternmost Russia. In turn the volcanoes and peninsula are part of the tectonically active "Ring of Fire" that almost surrounds the Pacific Ocean, denoted by active volcanoes and frequent earthquakes. Shiveluch occupies the point where the northeast-trending Kamchatka volcanic line intersects the northwest-trending Aleutian volcanic line. Junctions such as this are typically points of intense volcanic activity. According to scientists, the summit rocks of Shiveluch have been dated at approximately 65,000 years old. Lava layers on the sides of the volcano reveal at least 60 major eruptions in the last 10,000 years, making it the most active volcano in the 2,200 kilometer distance that includes the Kamchatka peninsula and the Kuril island chain. Shiveluch rises from almost sea level to well above 3,200 miles (summit altitude 3,283 miles) and is often capped with snow. In this summer image however, the full volcano is visible, actively erupting ash and steam in late June or early July, 2007. The dull brown plume extending from the north of the volcano summit is most likely a combination of ash and steam (top). The two larger white plumes near the summit are dominantly steam, a common adjunct to eruptions, as rain and melted snow percolate down to the hot interior of the volcano. The sides of the volcano show many eroded stream channels. The south slope also reveals a long sloping apron of collapsed material, or pyroclastic flows. Such debris flows have repeatedly slid down and covered the south side of the volcano during major eruptions when the summit lava domes explode and collapse (this occurred during major eruptions in 1854 and 1964). Regrowth of the forest on the south slope (note the contrast with the eastern slope) has been foiled by the combined effects of continued volcanic activity, instability of the debris flows and the short growing season.
International Space Sta...
2007-03-09 0:0:0
 
Description
ISS014-E-05615 (14 Oct. 2006) --- Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. The port city of Bahia Blanca lies almost 600 kilometers southwest of Buenos Aires on the southern rim of the Argentine economic heartland. This small city of 275,000 people is captured in one frame which shows its position near the mouth of the Arroyo Naposta. The salt flats (gray) and wetlands bordering this estuary, characterized by twisting, light colored tidal channels and dark swamps, lie mainly on the south side of the river. The yellow tinge to the water surfaces arises from the partial sunglint reflection on this particular day. The name Bahia Blanca (White Bay) derives from the white color of the salt and was applied to the major bay--noted by Magellan as he probed the coast of South America for a passage to the Pacific Ocean in 1520--and then to the city at the head of this bay. Highways, airline routes and pipelines from oil and gas fields to the west and south all converge on Bahia Blanca. The city is a major cultural center and historically has acted as a gateway for immigration. Higher ground on the north side of the estuary affords stable ground for the growth of the city and for intensive agriculture, a mainstay of the Argentine economy. The city is set back from the waterfront where an industrial park, a petrochemical center, and dockyards (white ellipse) are located.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
JSC2000-E-02655 PIA2713 (FOR RELEASE: 17 February 2000)--- This topographic radar image shows the relationships of the dense urban development of Los Angeles and the natural contours of the land. The image includes the Pacific Ocean on the left, the flat Los Angeles Basin across the center, and the steep ranges of the Santa Monica and Verdugo mountains along the top. The two dark strips near the coast at lower left are the runways of Los Angeles International Airport. Downtown Los Angeles is the bright yellow and pink area at lower center. Pasadena, including the Rose Bowl, are seen half way down the right edge of the image. The communities of Glendale and Burbank, including the Burbank Airport, are seen at the center of the top edge of the image. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities such as Los Angeles. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 41 km (25 miles) x 29 km (18 miles) Location: 34.1 deg. North lat., 118.3 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
JSC2000-E-02780 PIA02732 (Release Date: 21 February 2000) --- The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau Plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement. This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to pink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters (4300 feet) of total relief. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Original Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-103 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S103-E-5361 (24 December 1999) --- This vertical view from the Space Shuttle Discovery shows two small islands of the Marianas Islands (Saipan and Tinian) in Micronesia in the Pacific Ocean. The STS-103 crew recorded this electronic still image at 28:05:53 GMT, December 24, 1999.
STS-116 Shuttle Mission...
2006-12-18 0:0:0
 
Description
S116-E-05983 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Backdropped by New Zealand and Cook Strait in the Pacific Ocean, astronaut Robert L. Curbeam Jr. (left) and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang, both STS-116 mission specialists, participate in the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction continues on the International Space Station. Cook Strait divides New Zealand's North and South Islands.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description
S114-E-5557 (28 July 2005) --- Japanese Aerospace Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi waves as he and his six STS-114 crewmates prepare to ingress the International Space Station for several days of joint activities. Earlier on this third flight day for the STS-114 crewmembers the Space Shuttle Discovery and the Space Station linked up over southern the Pacific Ocean west of the South American coast.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5018 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5014 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5035 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is visible against black space, primarily because its bright metallic disk-shaped base and the frame of its solar panels, as the Space Shuttle Columbia eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the seven-member crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5011 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5031 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5048 (3 March 2002) --- The top portion of the Hubble Space Telescope is photographed some 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, as the Space Shuttle Columbia is about to use its 50-foot-long robotic arm to lower the telescope into its cargo bay. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5057 (3 March 2002) --- One of the solar panels of the Hubble Space Telescope is pictured 350 miles above Pacific Ocean clouds Southwest of Mexico during capture operations. Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, was in control of the Shuttle's remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, was at the controls of the shuttle during capture and latch activities. The crew used a digital still camera to record a series of images documenting the fourth docking of a shuttle to the giant telescope during its tenure in space.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS109-E-5026 (3 March 2002) --- The Hubble Space Telescope is backdropped against black space as the Space Shuttle Columbia, with a crew of seven astronauts on board, eases closer and closer in order to latch its 50-foot-long robotic arm onto a fixture on the giant telescope. As Columbia flew 350 miles above the Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, with astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, in control of the arm and astronaut Scott D. Altman, mission commander, at the controls of the shuttle, the crew went on to capture the Hubble. The image was one of a series recorded with a digital still camera.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S72-36293 (27 April 1972) --- The Apollo 16 Command Module (CM), with astronauts John W. Young, Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Charles M. Duke Jr. aboard, splashed down in the central Pacific Ocean to successfully conclude their lunar landing mission. The splashdown occurred at 290:37:06 ground elapsed time, 1:45:06 p.m. (CST) Thursday, April 27, 1972, at coordinates of 00:43.2 degrees south latitude and 156:11.4 degrees west longitude. A point approximately 215 miles southeast of Christmas Island. Later the three crew men were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship U.S.S. Ticonderoga.
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
S72-55834 (19 December 1972) --- The Apollo 17 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, nears splashdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully concludes the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. This overhead view was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 304:31:59 ground elapsed time, 1:24:59 p.m. (CST) December 19, 1972, at coordinates of 166 degrees 8 minutes west longitude and 27 degrees 53 minutes south latitude, about 350 nautical miles southeast of the Samoan Islands. The splashdown was only .8 miles from the target point. Later, the three crewmen were picked up by a helicopter from the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Ticonderoga.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS79-E-5065 (19 September 1996) --- As seen from the Space Shuttle Atlantis' flight deck, backdropped against Cook Strait, the Tasman Sea and the south Pacific Ocean, several components of Russia's Mir Space Station greet STS-79 crew members looking through aft-flight deck windows. Egmont National Park and Mt. Egmont on New Zealand's North Island can be easily delineated, during Flight Day 4.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS079-E-5100 (20 September 1996) --- The crew aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis was able to track the large Typhoon Violet in the western Pacific Ocean. At the beginning of the mission, Violet was south and west of Japan, and packed winds of 140 - 150 miles per hour. Four days into the flight, about the time this Electronic Still Camera (ESC) view was recorded and downlinked to Earth, Violet became extra-tropical, but she still had winds up to 90 knots (nautical miles per hour).
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS085-E-5092 (14 August 1997) --- Flying directly over the eye just before 3 p.m. (EST), Aug. 15, the STS-85 crew members captured this image of Super Typhoon Winnie. The massive typhoon is located about half way between Japan and New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean. The Canadian-built robot arm of Discovery, being used in operations with CRISTA-SPAS on this mission, is partially visible in left foreground.
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS085-E-5069 (13 August 1997) --- Category five Super Typhoon Winnie as it was passing over the Marianas in the Pacific Ocean. It was moving at 160 miles per hour (mph) with gusts up to 195 mph. The photograph was taken with the Electronic Still Camera (ESC).
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS085-E-5071 (13 August 1997) --- The STS-85 crew members aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery downlinked this oblique, Electronic Still Camera (ESC) view of the Super Typhoon Winnie about halfway between New Guinea and Japan in the Pacific Ocean late evening, August 13, 1997. Maximum sustained winds of 105 knots, gusts up to 130 knots. This photo was taken 14 1/2 hours after STS085-E-5069 was recorded with the same ESC.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS98-E-5040 (9 February 2001) --- One of a series of three digital still camera's views of the station's Unity node and the docking mechanism just prior to link up between the station and the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sailing at 17,000 miles per hour 200 miles above the Pacific Ocean, astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 mission commander, flawlessly pulled the shuttle alongside the International Space Station and docked, in position to add the new Destiny laboratory to the complex on the following day and begin a new era in space research. Atlantis went on to dock with the station on schedule at 10:51 a.m. (CST), February 9, and the station and shuttle crews opened hatches between the spacecraft at 1:03 p.m.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS98-E-5042 (9 February 2001) --- One of a series of three digital still camera's views of the station's Unity node and the docking mechanism just prior to link up between the station and the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sailing at 17,000 miles per hour 200 miles above the Pacific Ocean, astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 mission commander, went on to flawlessly pull the shuttle alongside the International Space Station and dock it, in position to add the new Destiny laboratory to the complex on the following day and begin a new era in space research. Atlantis docked with the station on schedule at 10:51 a.m. (CST), February 9, and the station and shuttle crews opened hatches between the spacecraft at 1:03 p.m.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS98-E-5041 (9 February 2001) --- One of a series of three digital still camera's views of the station's Unity node and the docking mechanism just prior to link up between the station and the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Sailing at 17,000 miles per hour 200 miles above the Pacific Ocean, astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 mission commander, flawlessly pulled the shuttle alongside the International Space Station and docked, in position to add the new Destiny laboratory to the complex on the following day and begin a new era in space research. Atlantis went on to dock with the station on schedule at 10:51 a.m. (CST), February 9, and the station and shuttle crews opened hatches between the spacecraft at 1:03 p.m.
STS-68 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS068-237-099 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- This 70mm frame shows the Panama Canal (center, between the two dark green belts) the main ship way to travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Also seen is a great deal of detail in Panama City (left center, on the Pacific Ocean coastline). Geologists studying the photography returned by Shuttle astronauts feel this picture is the best ever of the city. Agricultural fields can be seen on the east side of Panama City and on both sides of the Pan American Highway (the straight thin line extending to the left). Sedimentation in the Chepo River (upper left) is thought to be due to eroded soil from the agricultural lands near the sea. This river is surrounded by swamps lying along the Pacific coastline.
STS-68 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS068-260-078 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- The ice visible along the bottom of this view is the north end of the larger (southern) of two great remaining ice field of the Andes Mountains in Chile. The longest glacier visible here flows down into the Calen Fjord (an arm of the Pacific Ocean known as Canal Baker) where numerous calved icebergs can be seen floating. The other three glaciers end in glacier-cut valleys with small lakes - the bigger lake has numerous icebergs as well. the river snaking through the mountains to the fjord drains water from the great Lake O'Higgins, which lies out of the picture to the right. Glacial mud can be seen emptying into the fjord and discoloring the water with its milky color.
STS-76 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS076-713-083 (23 March 1996) --- Backdropped against a massive array of clouds over the South Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea, Russia's Mir Space Station is seen from the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The two spacecraft were in the process of making their third docking in Earth-orbit. With the subsequent delivery of astronaut Shannon W. Lucid to the Mir, the Mir-21 crew grew to three, as the mission specialist quickly becomes a cosmonaut guest researcher. She will spend approximately 140 days on Mir before returning to Earth.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS079-835-068 Canterbury Plain, Southern Alps, New Zealand September 1996 In this west-looking view, the snow-covered Southern Alps of central South Island, New Zealand can be seen. Running southwest to northeast along the western coast of South Island, the Southern Alps are rugged mountains made up of numerous peaks in excess of 9842 feet (3000 meters). Within the Southern Alps, there are over 3100 active glaciers. Evergreen woodlands dot the western coast and many glacial lakes are visible on the eastern slopes of the mountains. Just below the center of the image, the Canterbury Plain, the largest area of fertile, flat land in New Zealand, is visible. Braided rivers up to 16 miles (25 km) wide are discernible crossing the plain. The Banks Peninsula, formed following a violent eruption of two volcanoes, extends outward from the east coast into the Pacific Ocean. The peninsula is 35 miles (56 km) long and 25 miles (40 km) wide. The bright area off the west coast of the island is caused by sun glint off the waters of the Tasman Sea.
STS-83 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS083-482-034 (4-8 April 1997) --- A special lens on a 35mm camera gives a "fish-eye" effect this view of the Spacelab Module backdropped over the Pacific Ocean. Nearly all of Baja California and part of western Mexico can be seen at left. Five NASA astronauts and two scientist payload specialists were scheduled to spend 16-days in Earth-orbit but came home early when a problem with one of three fuel cells was recognized.
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
STS085-716-081 (7-19 August 1997) --- This photograph provides a southerly view from Vancouver, B. C. in the foreground, to Portland, Oregon near the top. Coastal stratus, a common occurrence, hugs the Pacific coastline and laps into Puget sound. The silty Fraser River cuts through Vancouver and empties into Puget Sound with a large, milky plume of sediment (bottom). Near the top of the image, the Columbia River runs across the Cascades (between Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood) and the Coast Ranges to the Pacific Ocean. Snow caps the highest peaks of the Olympic Mountains (near center), and the Cascade volcanoes of Rainier (closest to Seattle), Adams and Hood (top). The smaller, gray mountain just south (above and right) of Rainier is Mt. St. Helens.
51-100 of 104
1 2 3