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Browse All : Images of Peru

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MLS water vapor
MLS water vapor
1/27/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
MLS/water vapor
MLS/water vapor
3/3/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
International Space Sta...
2005-05-02 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-20111 (15 March 2005) --- Lima, Peru is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 10 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Located on the broad alluvial fan of the Rimac River, Lima is the capital of Peru and the only mega city (7.7 million inhabitants in 2002) located on the western coastline of South America. The city was established by Francisco Pizarro in 1535 and became an important colonial port linking silver mines of the Altiplano of the high Andes to the east with the burgeoning Spanish empire. During the mid-20th century a significant relocation of people from rural mountain communities into the Lima metropolitan area led to its growth into a mega city. Problems now facing the metropolitan region include development of adequate water resources, control of pollution, and the potential effects of natural hazards such as earthquakes and landslides. This photograph depicts the wealthier San Isidro and Mira Flores quarters of Lima. This part of the metropolitan area is characterized by numerous vegetated parks, golf courses (such as the Lima Golf Course?approximately 1 kilometer long), and greenbelts interspersed with residential and commercial areas. The higher proportion of dark asphalt in the street grid of the residential and commercial areas lends a purple coloration to the left portion of the image (downtown Lima is to the north). Regions with fewer built materials and vegetation are light tan. Wave patterns are visible approaching beaches, popular tourist destinations, in the lower half of the image.
International Space Sta...
2005-03-30 0:0:0
 
Description ISS006-E-38306 (14 March 2003) --- The Arid Coast of Peru is featured in this digital image photographed by an Expedition 6 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). This oblique, south-looking view shows the dramatic canyons of Peru?s southern coast (15.5 ? 17 degrees S). According to NASA scientists studying ISS imagery, these are relatively young features carved by rivers mainly over the past 8 million years following the last major upheaval of the Andes Mountains. The canyons are some of the steepest and deepest on Earth?lake Laguna Parincocha (top left corner) lies on the Andean plateau about 3,250 meters above sea level, only 80 kilometers from the coast. A sheet of volcanic rock (known as an ignimbrite deposit) emplaced during an explosive eruptive event is scored with a dense pattern of parallel dry streams in the lower left corner of the image. Volcanic source regions for the ignimbrite lie outside the left margin of the view. The Yauca and Acar? rivers feed small tan-colored sediment plumes into the sea (lower right). Dark green agricultural fields cluster along the lower courses of the rivers. Strong southerly winds have generated sand dunes and dark wind streaks along the coast, whose alignments re-curve inland into the lower river valleys (lower right). The coast and canyons are commonly hazy due to oceanic air and blowing dust. Yellow lines parallel with the coast and near the small peninsula, according to scientists, are raised shorelines probably caused by tectonic uplift of the coastline.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-07388 (14 June 2003) --- Some of the deepest canyons in the world cut west to the Pacific from the high crest of the Andes Mountains in Peru. This view taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS) provides a birds-eye view down the canyons of the Rio Camana (center left) and the Rio Ocona (upper right). The low early morning sun highlights the extreme topography created by rapidly uplifting mountains and powerful water erosion by water dropping nearly 10,000 feet in this view. At the edge of the image are the snowy flanks of Nevado Coropuna, the highest mountain in the Cordillera Occidental (6613 meters). The coastal city of Camana is visible in the upper left.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-15222 (22 September 2003) --- This view in southern Peru, photographed by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS), features the Toquepala copper mine, a steep sided and stepped open-pit mine. Mid-afternoon sunlight of the arid slopes of the central Andes Mountains provides an accent to the mine contours. At the surface the open pit is 6.5 kilometers across and it descends more than 3000 meters into the earth. A dark line on the wall of the pit is the main access road to the bottom.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-05649 (8 November 2003) --- Lake Titicaca was featured in this image taken by one of the Expedition 8 crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lake Titicaca, at an elevation of 12,507 feet in the Andean Altiplano, is the highest large lake in the world. More than 120 miles long and 50 miles wide, it was the center of Incan civilization, and today straddles the boundary between Peru and Bolivia. Scientists have studied indicators of the water level changes over time to tease out information about precipitation shifts in the high Andes and the South American tropics. Following are some observations by NASA scientists who are studying this imagery: Because the lake occupies the low point of the Altiplano, much of the water of the high plateau eventually trickles into the lake. And because it is surrounded by mountains, very little of Lake Titicaca?s water drains out -- the Rio Desguadero is the only major outflow river. So, like a bathtub with no drain, this large and deep lake (with depths of several hundred feet) has become the collecting basin for thousands of years of sediment. These sediments and their fossils contain clues about past climate conditions. The restricted outflow of the lake creates conditions where even shorter, interannual climate cycles (like El Ni?o /Southern Oscillation) impact Lake Titicaca?s water levels. Recent lake level variations have been several meters, with low levels occurring during regional droughts of El Ni?os. Right now, the region is relatively wet. In this image, the dark greens of the wetlands along the shallower margins of the lake contrast strongly with the surrounding desert. But the even large cities like Puno, Peru (100,000 people) are difficult to discern from the surrounding countryside.
International Space Sta...
2006-08-23 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-66488 (14 Aug. 2006) --- Ash cloud from Ubinas Volcano, Peru is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Subduction of the Nazca tectonic plate along the western coast of South America forms the high Peruvian Andes, and also produces magma feeding a chain of historically active volcanoes along the western front of the mountains. The most active of these volcanoes in Peru is Ubinas. A typical steep-sided stratovolcano comprised primarily of layers of silica-rich lava flows, it has a summit elevation of 5,672 meters. The volcanic cone appears distinctively truncated or flat-topped in profile -- the result of a relatively small eruption that evacuated a magma reservoir near the summit. Following removal of the magma, the summit material collapsed downwards to form the current 1.4 kilometer-wide summit caldera. This oblique image (looking at an angle from the ISS) captures an ash cloud first observed on satellite imagery at 11:00 GMT on Aug. 14, 2006; this image was acquired one hour and 45 minutes later. The ash cloud resulted in the issuing of an aviation hazard warning by the Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. Modern activity at Ubinas is characterized by these minor to moderate explosive eruptions of ash and larger pumice - a volcanic rock characterized by low density and high proportion of gas bubbles formed as the explosively-erupted parent lava cools during its transit through the air. These materials blanket the volcanic cone and surrounding area, giving this image an overall gray appearance. Shadowing of the western flank of Ubinas throws several lava flows into sharp relief, and highlights the steep slopes at the flow fronts -- a common characteristic of silica-rich, thick, and slow-moving lavas. NASA researchers note that the most recent major eruption of Ubinas occurred in 1969, however the historical record of activity extends back to the 16th century.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-E-5887 (9 March 2002) --- This view of a good portion of the country of Chile was recorded with a digital still camera by one of the STS-109 astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Chile's Pacific Coast is featured and the country's borders with three other nations--Bolivia, Peru and Argentina--almost or just barely made it into the frame in three different directions. Punta Angamos and Punta Tetas are readily visible on the anvil shaped peninsular feature, near the city of Antofagasta.
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