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Browse All : Images of Saudi Arabia

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Flight Day 1
Flight Day 1
NASA
5/13/09
 
Year 2009
International Space Sta...
2005-07-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-20261 (19 March 2005) --- Jeddah, Saudi Arabia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 10 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city of Jeddah is the second largest city in Saudi Arabia (after Riyadh), and is the country?s most important Red Sea port. A large warehouse and dock complex is visible in the lower left portion of this image. Apart from being a major port for exchange of goods with Africa and Europe, Jeddah is of great importance for Islamic pilgrims going east to Mecca (a religious journey known as the hajj). In addition to urban attractions, coral reefs along the coast (north-south trending islands to image left) are frequented by divers visiting the city. The image captures the multicolored rooftops of homes and other buildings in the city, the oldest of which were built using coral from the nearby Red Sea and clay from the al-Manqabah lagoon in the center of the Al Balad district (center of image; lagoon is approximately 0.25 km across).
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-16355 (15 February 2004) --- A massive sandstorm over the Persian Gulf state of Qatar blows southward toward southeastern Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in this image photographed by an Expedition 8 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS).
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-18935 (24 March 2004) --- This photo of a large black smoke plume from an oil fire was taken by an Expedition 8 crewmember on the International Space Station as the Station orbited northeastward across Saudi Arabia. According to a front-page story in the New York Times, an oil pipeline near the channel of Shatt al Arab in southeastern Iraq on the Persian Gulf ruptured the day before. The resulting oil spill ignited and its smoke can here be seen to extend over 100 miles northwestward into southern Iraq.
STS-83 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS083-747-033 (4-8 April 1997) --- Center Pivot Irrigation, in Saudi Arabia. This irrigation project in Saudi Arabia is typical of many isolated irrigation projects scattered throughout the arid and hyper-arid regions of the Earth. Fossil water is mined from depths as great as 3,000 feet, pumped to the surface, and distributed via large center pivot irrigation feeds. The circles of green irrigated vegetation may comprise a variety of agricultural commodities from alfalfa to wheat. Diameters of the normally circular fields range from a few hundred meters to as much as 2 miles. The projects often trace out a narrow, sinuous, and seemingly random path. Actually, engineers generally seek ancient river channels now buried by the sand seas. The fossil waters mined in these projects accumulated during periods of wetter climate in the Pleistocene glacial epochs, between 10,000 to 2 million years ago, and are not being replenished under current climatic conditions. The projects, therefore, will have limited production as the reservoirs are drained. Water, of course, is the key to agriculture in Saudi Arabia. The Kingdom has implemented a multifaceted program to provide the vast supplies of water necessary to achieve the spectacular growth of the agricultural sector. A network of dams has been built to trap and utilize precious seasonal floods. Vast underground water reservoirs have been tapped through deep wells. Desalination plants have been built to produce fresh water from the sea for urban and industrial use, thereby freeing other sources for agriculture. Facilities have also been put into place to treat urban and industrial run-off for agricultural irrigation. These efforts collectively have helped transform vast tracts of the desert into fertile farmland. Land under cultivation has grown from under 400,000 acres in 1976 to more than 8 million acres in 1993.
STS-83 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS083-709-030 (4-8 April 1997) --- Panorama over the Nile River, Sinai Peninsula and the Red Sea. Looking past the Orbiter's tail, this view extends from central Egypt eastward to Saudi Arabia on the horizon. Two major water systems, seen in this view, the Nile River and the Red Sea are used for world commerce and transportation in this region. The Nile is flanked immediately by agriculture then beyond by desert. This emphasizes the importance of the river waters to sustain a thriving local population. The Nile River delta is north under the clouds on the upper left-hand corner of the photo. Geologically, the Red Sea is a spreading center between the Arabian and the African Plates, and will continue to widen slowly over a long period of time.
STS-87 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS087-703-089 (19 November ? 5 December 1997) --- Featured in this view is center pivot irrigation in central Saudi Arabia. Abundant petroleum has provided the energy source for deep-well pumps that tap groundwater stored in bedrock many thousands of years ago when the climate was much wetter. The fields are carved out of ancient alluvial fan deposits, also formed when rainfall was much greater; the fields are pushed right to the edge of the Nafud al Mazhur (sand sea), representative of the present climate. The mining of petroleum and groundwater has enabled Saudi Arabia to become an exporter of wheat and other commodities, in addition to the oil for which it is famous. This picture is one of the 70mm Earth observation visuals used by the crew at its post flight presentation events.
STS-107 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS107-400-010 (16 January ? 1 February 2003) --- This view featuring Saudi Arabia, the Red Sea, Egypt, and the Nile River was photographed by an STS-107 crewmember onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. EDITOR?S NOTE: On February 1, 2003, the seven crewmembers were lost with the Space Shuttle Columbia over North Texas. This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the debris.
STS-108 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS108-718-041 (5-17 December 2001) --- The triangular Sinai Peninsula of Egypt appears below the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2 in the foreground (right), with the Gulf of Suez to its west (far right) and the Gulf of Aqaba (center bottom). These gulfs join to become the Red Sea, which stretches away south to the horizon down the left side of this south-looking view. Saudi Arabia lies to the left and Egypt and Sudan to the right. The photo, from a 70mm handheld camera, was made while the Space Shuttle Endeavouor was docked with the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-024 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the Sinai Peninsula and the Dead Sea Rift. The left side of the view is dominated by the great triangle of the Sinai peninsula, which is partly obscured by an unusual cloud mass on this day. The famous Monastery of St. Catherine lies in the very remote, rugged mountains in the southern third of the peninsula (foreground). The Gulf of Aqaba is a finger of the Red Sea bottom center, pointing north to the Dead Sea, the small body of water near the center of the view. According to NASA scientists studying the STS-109 photo collection, the gulf and the Dead Sea are northerly extensions of the same geological rift that resulted in the opening of the Red Sea . The Gulf of Suez appears in the lower left corner. Northwest Saudi Arabia occupies the lower right side of the view, Jordan and Syria the right and top right, and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea the top left. Thin white lines of cloud have formed along the coastal mountains of southern Turkey and stretch across the top of the view near the Earth's limb.
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