REFINE 

Browse All : Images of Switzerland

1-8 of 8
Oetztal, Austria
Oetztal, Austria
4/13/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Lyman Spitzer, Jr.
 
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-11227 (28 July 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station. On the left side of the image (under the left wing) is Lake Neuchatel, Switzerland. The city at the end of the lake is Yverdon. The Jura Mountains (most of the green portion of the background) are to the right in the image. Discovery later docked to the Station at 6:18 a.m. (CDT) on Thursday, July 28, 2005 as the two spacecraft orbited over the southern Pacific Ocean west of the South American coast. Onboard the Shuttle were astronauts Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander; James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Stephen K. Robinson, Wendy B. Lawrence, Charles J. Camarda and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, all mission specialists.
International Space Sta...
2005-08-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-11257 (28 July 2005) --- Space Shuttle Discovery was about 600 feet from the International Space Station when cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander, and astronaut John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, photographed the spacecraft as it approached the Station and performed a backflip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander, guided the Shuttle through the flip. The photos will be analyzed by engineers on the ground as additional data to evaluate the condition of Discovery?s heat shield. The scene is over Switzerland.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2006-02-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-11258 (28 July 2005) --- View of the Space Shuttle Discovery as photographed during the survey operations performed by the Expedition 11 crew on the International Space Station during the STS-114 R-Bar Pitch Maneuver on Flight Day 3. Discovery docked to the station at 6:18 a.m. (CDT) on Thursday, July 28, 2005. Parts of Switzerland are in the background. Onboard the shuttle were astronauts Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander; James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S. W. Thomas, Stephen K. Robinson, Wendy B. Lawrence, Charles J. Camarda and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, all mission specialists.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-77377 (5 Sept. 2006) --- Bernese Alps, Switzerland is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. The formidable mountain system of the Alps stretches across much of central Europe, with seven countries claiming portions of the mountains within their borders (Germany, France, Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, and Slovenia). The glacial landscape of the Bernese Alps, located in southwestern Switzerland, is well illustrated by this view. The image was taken by a crewmember looking north-northwest while the station was located over the Mediterranean Sea between Corsica and Italy -- this oblique viewing angle imparts a sense of perspective to the image. This type of viewing angle complements more nadir (downward)--viewing imagery of the region. Three of the higher peaks of the central Alps are visible--Jungfrau (4,158 meters), Moench (4,089 meters), and Eiger (3,970 meters). To the east and south of the Jungfrau is the Aletsch Glacier, clearly marked by dark medial moraines extending along the glacier's length parallel to the valley axis. The moraines are formed from rock and soil debris collected along the sides of three mountain glaciers located near the Jungfrau and Moench peaks -- as these flowing ice masses merge to form the Aletsch Glacier, the debris accumulates in the middle of the glacier and is carried along the flow direction. According to geologists, Lake Brienz to the northwest was formed by the actions of both glacial ice and the flowing waters of the Aare and Lutschine rivers, and has a maximum depth of 261 meters. The lake has a particularly fragile ecosystem, as demonstrated by the almost total collapse of the whitefish population in 1999. Possible causes for the collapse, according to the scientists, include increased water turbidity associated with upstream hydropower plant operations, and reduction of phosphorus (a key nutrient for lake algae, a basic element of the local food web) due to water quality concerns.
International Space Sta...
2007-01-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-07084 (2 Nov. 2006) --- Geneva, Switzerland is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city is located at the southernmost tip of Lake Geneva (also known as Lac Leman) between two major mountain ranges, the Jura to the northwest (not shown) and the Alps to the southeast (the northern foothills of which are represented by Mount Saleve at bottom). The city's built area, roadways, and airport appear as white to grey surfaces in this view. Urbanized regions are interspersed with agricultural fields (bright green to light brown rectangular regions) and preserved forest stands (dark green) around the Lake. One of the defining moments in the city's history was the defeat of an attack by the dukedom of Savoy in 1602; the event -- known as "l'Escalade" is celebrated annually as a symbol of Geneva's independence. The city joined Switzerland as a canton (or state) in 1815. The city's recent history demonstrates its continuing importance to geopolitics. The League of Nations was headquartered here from 1919-1946, and the European headquarters of the United Nations is likewise located here. The Geneva Conventions, or "rules of war", were signed here from 1864 through 1949. The city also hosts the headquarters of numerous other international organizations and corporations - making it a "world city" of cultural, economic, and political significance.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-98PC-246 (January 30, 1998) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Senior government officials from 15 countries participating in the International Space Station (ISS) signed agreements in Washington D.C. on Jan. 29 to establish the framework of cooperation among the partners on the design, development, operation and utilization of the Space Station. Acting Secretary of State Strobe Talbott signed the 1998 Intergovernmental Agreement on Space Station Cooperation with representatives of Russia, Japan, Canada, and participating countries of the European Space Agency (ESA), including Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Some of these officials then toured KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, at front, sixth from the left. They are, left to right, front to back: Hidetoshi Murayama, National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA); Louis Laurent, Embassy of France; Haakon Blankenborg, Norwegian Parliament Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs; His Excellency Joris Vos, ambassador of the Netherlands; His Excellency Tom Vraalsen, ambassador of Norway; Daniel Goldin; Luigi Berlinguer, Italian minister for education, scientific, and technological research; Antonio Rodota, director general, European Space Agency (ESA); Yvan Ylieff, Belgian minister of science and chairman of the ESA Ministerial Council; Jacqueline Ylieff; Masaaki Komatsu, KSC local NASDA representative and interpreter; Serge Ivanets, space attache, Embassy of Russia; Hiroshi Fujita, Science and Technology Agency of Japan; Akira Mizutani, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Peter Grognard, science attache, Royal Embassy of Belgium; Michelangelo Pipan, Italian diplomatic counselor to the minister; His Excellency Gerhard Fulda, German Federal Foreign Office; Jorg Feustel-Buechl, ESA director of manned space flight and microgravity; A. Yakovenko, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs; JoAnn Morgan, KSC associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades; Steve Francois, director, International Space Station and Shuttle Processing; Roy Tharpe, Boeing launch site manager; Jon Cowart, ISS elements manager; John Schumacher, NASA associate administrator for external relations; Didier Kechemair, space advisor to the French minister for education, research, and technology; Yoshinori Yoshimura, NASDA; and Loren Shriver, KSC deputy director for launch and payload processing. Node 1 of the ISS is in the background.
1-8 of 8