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Browse All : Images of The Valley

1-38 of 38
Wadi Kufra, Libya
Wadi Kufra, Libya
6/1/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
4/11/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
4/13/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
10/5/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
GLOBAL SURVEYOR CAPTURES POSTCARD VIEW OF MARTIAN VALLEYS
GLOBAL SURVEYOR CAPTURE...
10/5/00
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2000
Karakax Valley, China 3-D View
Karakax Valley, China 3...
11/6/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia L, C bands
Kliuchevskoi Volcano, R...
10/3/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
North Ecuador volcanoes
North Ecuador volcanoes
12/14/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
Oetztal, Austria
Oetztal, Austria
4/13/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Owens Valley, Calif. 3-D View
Owens Valley, Calif. 3-...
11/6/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
Perspective View with Landsat Overlay Caliente Range and Cuyama Valley, California
Perspective View with L...
1/11/01
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 2001
Rocky Mountain front range, Montana 3-D perspective view L & C bands
Rocky Mountain front ra...
5/16/96
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1996
Safsaf, L&C
Safsaf, L&C
4/16/94
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1994
Saline Valley, Calif. 3-D View
Saline Valley, Calif. 3...
11/6/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
San Fernando Valley
San Fernando Valley
11/5/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
San Fernando Valley, California
San Fernando Valley, Ca...
8/13/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
San Jose close-up, California
San Jose close-up, Cali...
1/22/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
San Jose region, California
San Jose region, Califo...
1/22/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
Southeast Tibet mountains
Southeast Tibet mountai...
5/14/98
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1998
Sunbury, Pennsylvania L & C bands
Sunbury, Pennsylvania L...
4/27/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
A90-3001
A90-3001
8/21/90
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1990
A90-3002
A90-3002
8/21/90
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1990
A90-3004
A90-3004
8/24/90
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1990
A86-7034
A86-7034
1/26/86
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1986
A86-7036
A86-7036
1/27/86
NASA/Ames Research Cent...
 
Year 1986
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-07360 (14 June 2003) --- This regional view of Salt Lake City, Utah taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS) shows the city and its suburbs nestled between the Wasatch Front and the Great Salt Lake. The core of Interstate Highway 15 runs North-South through the valley, with suburbs arrayed east and west of the highway. An important issue facing Salt Lake City?s growing population is preservation and allocation of water resources. Utah is in its fifth year of drought. One of the most dramatic effects of the drought visible in this picture is the fact that the lake levels are so low that Antelope Island is separated from the mainland by dry lakebed. Expansive productive wetlands occur where freshwater flows from the Wasatch Range and into the lake. The southern end of this network of wetlands can be seen in the image.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-18082 (26 October 2003) --- The fires in the San Bernardino Mountains, fueled by Santa Ana winds, burned out of control on the morning of Oct. 26, 2003, when these images were taken from the International Space Station at roughly 11 a.m. (PST). Thick yellow smoke blows south, blanketing the valley below. This image and ISS007-E-18078 , looking southeast, capture the smoke pall as the ISS approached and passed over the region. Image numbers 18078 and 18082 were taken roughly a minute apart. A small break in the smoke marks Cajon pass. Content was provided by JSC?s Earth Observation Lab. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help crew members take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth -- http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/.
International Space Sta...
2006-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-06947 (12 April 2006) --- Viedma Glacier, Argentina is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. The ice fields of Patagonia, located at the southern end of South America, are the largest masses of ice in the temperate Southern Hemisphere (approximately 55,000 square kilometers in area). The ice fields contain numerous valley glaciers that terminate in melt-water-fed lakes. These are known as ?calving? glaciers, as they lose mass by collapse of large ice chunks from the terminus--or end--of the glacier. These newly separated chunks of ice are then free to float away, much like ice cubes in a punch bowl. The Patagonian glaciers are closely monitored using remotely sensed data as they respond to regional climate change. Visual comparison of time series of images is typically performed to quantify change in ice extent and position. The terminus of the Viedma Glacier, approximately two kilometers across where it enters Lake Viedma, is shown in this image. Moraines are accumulations of soil and rock debris that form along the sides and front of a glacier as it flows across the landscape (much like a bulldozer). Independent valley glaciers can merge together as they flow downslope, and the moraines become entrained in the center of the new ice mass. These medial moraines are visible as dark parallel lines within the white central mass of the glacier (image center and left). Crevasses - oriented roughly perpendicular to the medial moraines - are also visible in the grey-brown ice along the sides of the glacier. According to scientists, the canyon-like crevasses form as a result of stress between the slower moving ice along the valley sides and the more rapidly moving ice in the center of the glacier. Calving of ice from the southwestern fork of the glacier terminus is visible at image lower left.
International Space Sta...
2006-10-17 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-78506 (7 Sept. 2006) --- Sand dunes near Mongolia's Har Lake are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. Har (or Black) Lake is located in the western part of the country within the Valley of Lakes--part of a system of closed basins that stretches across central Asia. According to scientists, these basins are the remnants of larger paleolakes that had begun to shrink in size by approximately five thousand years ago as regional climate became drier. Today, the Valley of Lakes is an important ecological resource for study of steppe grasslands, and as resting points for large numbers of migratory birds. Portions of the basin are designated as national parks or other protected areas, and Har Lake itself is an ecotourism destination (usually by horseback). This oblique view captures the dynamic nature of the landscape of Har Lake. The lake is encircled by sand dune fields which encroach on the lower slopes of the Tobhata Mountains to the west and south. Gaps in the mountains have been exploited by sand dunes moving eastward (indicating westerly winds) -- the most striking example being a series of dunes entering Har Lake along its southwestern shoreline. Here, the dune forms reflect the channeling of winds through the break in the mountain ridgeline, leading to dune crests oriented transverse to northwesterly winds. Another well-developed line of dunes is visible between Har and Baga Lakes. While these dunes appear to cut across a lake surface, the dunes have in fact moved across a narrow stream channel.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-76262 (4 Sept. 2006) --- Lake Morari, Tibet is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. Melt-water from glaciers to the east and west drains into Lake Morari, a large lake on the Tibetan Plateau which lies at an altitude of 4,521 meters (14,830 feet). The main inflow to the lake is via a west-side stream. Mud from this river gives the light blue hues to the lake water. The well-formed alluvial fan (center), built by sediment from the main inflow river, is the reason the lake has formed at this point in the valley. The fan has dammed up the depression now occupied by Lake Morari (approximately 7 kilometers wide in this view) and forms the curved southern shore of the lake. The apex of the fan lies fully 40 meters above the level of the lake. The change of color and texture on the fan seems to result from a new influx of gray sediment on top of an older fan which had several channels cut into it. Interestingly, the alluvial fan also acts as the only outlet of the lake, although no obvious outlet channel can be seen in this detailed view. South of the fan an outlet river appears as a green surface, possibly due to aquatic vegetation or algae. Altitude measurements show that the outlet river lies many meters below the lake surface.
International Space Sta...
2006-12-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-77377 (5 Sept. 2006) --- Bernese Alps, Switzerland is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. The formidable mountain system of the Alps stretches across much of central Europe, with seven countries claiming portions of the mountains within their borders (Germany, France, Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, and Slovenia). The glacial landscape of the Bernese Alps, located in southwestern Switzerland, is well illustrated by this view. The image was taken by a crewmember looking north-northwest while the station was located over the Mediterranean Sea between Corsica and Italy -- this oblique viewing angle imparts a sense of perspective to the image. This type of viewing angle complements more nadir (downward)--viewing imagery of the region. Three of the higher peaks of the central Alps are visible--Jungfrau (4,158 meters), Moench (4,089 meters), and Eiger (3,970 meters). To the east and south of the Jungfrau is the Aletsch Glacier, clearly marked by dark medial moraines extending along the glacier's length parallel to the valley axis. The moraines are formed from rock and soil debris collected along the sides of three mountain glaciers located near the Jungfrau and Moench peaks -- as these flowing ice masses merge to form the Aletsch Glacier, the debris accumulates in the middle of the glacier and is carried along the flow direction. According to geologists, Lake Brienz to the northwest was formed by the actions of both glacial ice and the flowing waters of the Aare and Lutschine rivers, and has a maximum depth of 261 meters. The lake has a particularly fragile ecosystem, as demonstrated by the almost total collapse of the whitefish population in 1999. Possible causes for the collapse, according to the scientists, include increased water turbidity associated with upstream hydropower plant operations, and reduction of phosphorus (a key nutrient for lake algae, a basic element of the local food web) due to water quality concerns.
International Space Sta...
2006-11-06 0:0:0
 
Description ISS013-E-78295 (6 Sept. 2006) --- Haze in the Po River Valley of Italy is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember onboard the International Space Station. The valley is visible across the horizontal center of the frame, with the floor obscured by what NASA scientists refer to as frequent atmospheric haze, a mixture of industrial pollutants, dust and smoke. The visual texture of such haze is perceptibly different from that of bright white clouds which stretch across the top of the scene and cover part of the Alps. The Po River Valley is Italy's industrial heartland and one of the most industrialized regions on Earth, according to scientists. Northern Italy is in the foreground of this southwesterly view. The partially cloud-covered Alps are at lower right; the Adriatic Sea at lower left. Corsica is under partial cloud cover at center; and Sardinia, almost totally obscured, is to its south. The island of Elba is visible just to the west of Italy. By contrast with haze accumulation along the axis of the valley, the Alps and the Apennines are clearly visible, and Lake Garda can be seen in the foothills of the Alps. Other visible geographic features are the lagoon at Venice north of the Po River delta, and three small lakes north of Rome. The winds on the day this image was taken are mainly from the north, as shown by the flow lines in the haze near Venice. The haze typically flows south down the Adriatic Sea. Visibility in the Mediterranean basin is often reduced by hazes such as these, deriving from different sources in industrialized Europe.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS01-E-5113 (December 2000) --- This scene on the remote, rugged Argentine/Chilean border in the far southern Andes Mountains offers numerous, dramatic examples of both erosional processes and features of ice and water. The sharp, glaciated crest of the Cerro San Lorenzo (center) exceeds 12,000 feet and casts a long shadow southeastward. Glaciers on its western flank flow into the valley. Lago Pueyrredon, and the other lakes visible here, have been excavated by geologically "recent" episodes of glacier erosion, when glaciers extended all the way onto the lowland plains (top right). Since the last melting of the glaciers, scientists estimate about 15,000 years ago, three distinct "fan-deltas" have formed where rivers flow into the lake. Counterclockwise currents in the lake, driven by strong winds from the west, have generated thin sand spits from each fan-delta. The largest spit (attached to the largest fan-delta, see right arrow) has isolated an approximately 10-kilometer long segment of the south end of the lake. This river, which has constructed the large fan, presently discharges turbid water to this isolated basin, giving it a lighter color than the rest of the lake. This Digital Still Camera photo was taken from the International Space Station, in December 2000 (late spring for this part of the world) when most of the previous winter's snow had melted below an altitude of 6,000 feet. Little evidence of man's presence can be found in this rough, desolate region. Glacial data collected over the past 50 years indicate that small ice bodies are disappearing at accelerated rates. (EOS, vol 81, no. 24, June 13, 2000) Predictions are that large fluctuations in land ice, with significant implications to society, are possible in the coming decades and centuries due to natural and anthropogenic climate change. Before glacial data can be used to address critical problems pertaining to the world's economic and environmental health, more detailed information about such glaciers is needed. Images like this from the International Space Station can be added to those taken from satellites (Landsat-7, instruments on the Terra satellite launched in 1999) to build data sets of glaciers in remote areas around the world.
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02517 PIA#02700 (14 February 2000) --- Rio Sao Francisco, Brazil. This topographic image acquired by SRTM shows an area south of the Sao Francisco River in Brazil. The scrub forest terrain shows relief of about 400 meters (1300 feet). Areas such as these are difficult to map by traditional methods because of frequent cloud cover and local inaccessibility. This region has little topographic relief, but even subtle changes in topography have far-reaching effects on regional ecosystems. The image covers an area of 57 km x 79 km and represents one quarter of the 225 km SRTM swath. Colors range from dark blue at water level to white and brown at hill tops. The terrain features that are clearly visible in this image include tributaries of the Sao Francisco, the dark-blue branch-like features visible from top right to bottom left, and on the left edge of the image, and hills rising up from the valley floor. The Sao Francisco River is a major source of water for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Mapping such regions will allow scientists to better understand the relationships between flooding cycles, forestation and human influences on ecosystems. This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 57 kilometers (35 miles) left-right, 79 kilometers (49 miles) Location: 9.7 deg. S lat., 39.9 deg. W lon. Orientation: North to upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet)
STS-99 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-02657 PIA02715 (17 February 2000) --- This topographic radar image shows the relationship of the urban area of Pasadena, California to the natural contours of the land. The image includes the alluvial plain on which Pasadena and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory sit, and the steep range of the San Gabriel Mountains. The mountain front and the valley running from upper left to the lower right are active fault zones, along which the mountains are rising. The chaparral-covered slopes above Pasadena are also a prime area for wildfires and mudslides. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities along the front of active mountain ranges. This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 41 km (25 miles) x 29 km (18 miles) Location: 34.2 deg. North lat., 118.1 deg. West lon. Orientation: North toward upper right Data Resolution: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA
STS-68 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS068-220-033 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- Photographed through the Space Shuttle Endeavour's flight deck windows, this 70mm frame shows a small section of China's Yellow River (Huang Ho) highlighted by sunglint reflection off the surface of the water. The river flows northeastward toward the village of Tung-lin-tzu. The low dissected mountains that cover more than half of this scene rise some 2,000 feet (on the average) above the valley floor. A major east-west transportation corridor (both railway and automobile) is observed traversing the landscape north of the river. This entire region is considered to be part of the Ordos Desert, actually part of the greater Gobi located just north of this area. Approximate center coordinates of this scene are 37.5 degrees north latitude and 105.0 degrees east longitude.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-810-001 Sacramento Valley, California, USA September 1996 The Sacramento River Valley is a flat, fertile plain that is flanked by high mountains to the east and lower but rugged hills to the west. The central valley of the Sacramento Basin narrows near the northern end of the valley. The deeply eroded and wooded southwestern flank of a mountain range that includes Mt. Lassen (not in this image) covers the northeastern third of the picture (dark terrain). Several lower, paralleling hilly ridges are visible along the western side of the valley. Black Butte Lake, a small Y-shaped reservoir, is barely visible near the edge of these folded beds (west center). Within the valley, the Sacramento River floodplain (and the river?s channels) can be traced across a landscape that is covered by a multitude of cultivated fields (angular-looking patterns, variety of colors). Interstate Highway 5 is observed as it runs north-south along the western side of the Sacramento Valley. The location of Chico (gray fine-textured feature) is barely discernible along the eastern side of the valley.
STS-85 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS085-503-061 (7 - 19 August 1997) --- Lakes Balkhash and Alakol, southern uplands of Kazakhstan, central Asia. The long, 600 kilometers arc of Lake Balkhash occupies the center of this clear west-looking view. The left of the view shows clearly the westernmost Dzungarian Basin in the autonomous region of Xinjiang Uygur (Sinkiang), China. Kazakhstan's capital city Almaty (Alma-Ata) lies out of sight behind the boom. The Dzungarian Gate is the straight, fault-bounded valley cutting through the Dzhungarskiy Alatau Range. The Gate has acted as a major pass for centuries, allowing access between east Asia and central Asia (the valley floor is about 1,500 feet, whereas peaks reach 15,000 feet on the west and about 10,000 feet on the east side) -- it was one of the routes used by the Mongols when they began their invasion of central Asia and Europe in the 13th century. Lake Ebinur is the bright area beneath the dust plume (left center); strong north winds from the steppes of Kazakhstan and Russia are funneled through the Dzungarian Gate where they pick up sediment from dry lakebeds and blow it into China. The Ili River flows westward, parallel to the Dzhungarskiy Alatau Range, through Kapchagay Lake (partially visible beneath boom), then northwest across a large delta plain and into Lake Balkhash.
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